česká hudba | czech music


personalities

pages: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 ... 23]

270 records

anniversaries 2021


  • Emil BURIAN

    (* 12.12.1876 Rakovník - † 9.10.1926 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - baryton

    Brother of the tenor Karel Burian, father of composer and director Emil František Burian.

    He studied in Prague at the Pivoda School of Vocalists, and later with Moritz Wallerstein. In 1895, he began his career as an actor in the Pištěk Theatre Society, which performed in Brno and Prague. Between 1898 and 1899, he worked in Pilsen, form 1900 to 1902 in Zagreb, form 1902 to 1904 in Pilsen, then from 1904 to 1906 in Freiburg. From 1900, he was the guest singer at the National Theatre in Prague, where he was engaged from 1906 to 1926 with some break between 1908 and 1909 when he performed in Dresden, Hamburg and from 1919 to 1920 in Budapest.

    He has a flexible tenor-baritone with perfect diction in many languages. He was also an excellent interpreter of Czech operas by Smetana, Dvořák, Fibich and Janáček. He was also educated in Italian opera i.e. Don Giovanni in Mozart's Don Giovanni, Almaviva in Mozart's Figaro's Wedding, Figaro in Rossini's The Barber of Seville, but he mastered the full repertoire of 19th century including Wagner (Telramund in Lohengrin, Amfortas in Parsifal) and others. He was also a famous interpreter of songs especially by Schubert, Dvořák, Mahler and Czech folklore.


  • Václav TALICH

    (* 28.5.1883 Kroměříž - † 16.3.1961 Beroun)

    dirigent a houslista

    Czech conductor and violinist

    He studied violin at the Prague Conservatory, in 1903 he became a member of Berliner Philharmoniker. From 1904, he worked as a violinist, teacher and conductor in Odessa and Tbilissi, and later in 1906-7 in Prague. From 1908 to 1912, he conducted the Slovenian Philharmonic and Opera in Lublana. During this time, he completed a short residency with Max Reger, Arthur Nikisch and Artur Vigny [Arturo Vigna]. Between 1912 and 1915, he was the Head of the Opera stage in Pilsen. He conducted the first concert of Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in 1917, between 1919 and 1941, he was the chief of this orchestra with the two-years interruption between 1931 and 1933, when he worked in Stockholm. From 1936 to 1945, he was the chief of the Czech Opera of the National Theatre in Prague. After the War, he was unjustifiably persecuted for his alleged collaboration. In 1946, he established a chamber orchestra, between 1949 and 1952, he worked in Bratislava, in 1954 he conducted for the last time in Prague. He has belonged to the famous conductors of his time with Romantic style of orchestral sound. He performed primarily Czech music (Antonín Dvořák, Vítězslav Novák, Leoš Janáček and Bedřich Smetana). He was a close friend of the composer Josef Suk and conducted many premieres of other contemporary Czech composers such as Martinů, Jeremiáš, Jirák and Bořkovec. He performed very often the works by Gustav Mahler (he also adopted revisions of Beethoven´s compositions by Mahler). He preferred specializing with perfect interpretation to a larger repertoire. He conducted the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra on several tours that contributed to the famous name of this orchestra.


  • Václav TALICH

    (* 28.5.1883 Kroměříž - † 16.3.1961 Beroun)

    dirigent a houslista

    Czech conductor and violinist

    He studied violin at the Prague Conservatory, in 1903 he became a member of Berliner Philharmoniker. From 1904, he worked as a violinist, teacher and conductor in Odessa and Tbilissi, and later in 1906-7 in Prague. From 1908 to 1912, he conducted the Slovenian Philharmonic and Opera in Lublana. During this time, he completed a short residency with Max Reger, Arthur Nikisch and Artur Vigny [Arturo Vigna]. Between 1912 and 1915, he was the Head of the Opera stage in Pilsen. He conducted the first concert of Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in 1917, between 1919 and 1941, he was the chief of this orchestra with the two-years interruption between 1931 and 1933, when he worked in Stockholm. From 1936 to 1945, he was the chief of the Czech Opera of the National Theatre in Prague. After the War, he was unjustifiably persecuted for his alleged collaboration. In 1946, he established a chamber orchestra, between 1949 and 1952, he worked in Bratislava, in 1954 he conducted for the last time in Prague. He has belonged to the famous conductors of his time with Romantic style of orchestral sound. He performed primarily Czech music (Antonín Dvořák, Vítězslav Novák, Leoš Janáček and Bedřich Smetana). He was a close friend of the composer Josef Suk and conducted many premieres of other contemporary Czech composers such as Martinů, Jeremiáš, Jirák and Bořkovec. He performed very often the works by Gustav Mahler (he also adopted revisions of Beethoven´s compositions by Mahler). He preferred specializing with perfect interpretation to a larger repertoire. He conducted the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra on several tours that contributed to the famous name of this orchestra.


  • Eva URBANOVÁ

    (* 20.4.1961 Slaný)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Czech soprano

    She began singing after acquirement of her civil profession. From 1987 to 1990, she was engaged in Pilsen. She debuted as the Foreign Duchess in Dvořák´s Rusalka. Since 1990, she has performed at the National Theatre in Prague, but she primarily works in foreign countries. She has a universal flexible dramatic soprano voice. She guested in the Opera La Scala in Milan (in 1997 as Gioconda in Ponchielli´s Gioconda), in Metropolitan Opera in New York (for first time in 1998) as Ortruda in Wagner´s Lohengrin, Tosca in Puccini´s Tosca, Santuzza in Mascagni´s Cavalleria rusticana and others. She has performed at the festival in Edinburgh in 1998 as Libusse (Smetana). She has also performed abroad as Donna Anna in Mozart´s Don Giovanni (a festival in Savonlinna, 1991), Tosca in Puccini´s Tosca and Norma in Bellini´s Norma (the Connecticut Grand Opera in 1994 and 1995), Sister Angelica in Puccini´s Sister Angelica (Zürich, 1996), Leonora in Verdi´s Il trovatore (Toronto, 1999), Milada in Smetana´s Dalibor (Cagliari, 1999), Kostelnička in Janáček´s Jenůfa (Washington, 2000), Gioconda in Ponchielli´s La Gioconda (Deutsche Oper Berlin, 2000), Turandot in Puccini´s Turandot (Amsterdam, 2002), the Foreing Duchess in Dvořák´s Rusalka (Paris, 2003).


  • Jan ADAMUS

    (* 20.6.1951 Havířov)

    hobojista


  • Josef SUK

    (* 8.8.1929 Praha - † 7.7.2011 Praha)

    český houslista


  • Štefan MARGITA

    (* 3.8.1956 Košice)

    slovenský operní pěvec - tenor

    Slovakian tenor

    He studied at the Conservatory in Košice, and later privately. From 1981 he was engaged in the Opera Košice, in 1986, he began performing at the National Theatre then between 1992 and 1994 at the State Opera. Here he performed the roles of Lenskij in Tschaikovsky´s  Eugen Onegin, Alfred in Verdi´s La Traviata, Ferrando in Mozart´s Cos? fan tutte, Don Ottavio in Mozart´s Don Giovanni, Manolios in Martinů´s The Greek Passion, Nemorino in Donizetti´s The Elixir of Love, Hoffmann in Offenbach´s Hoffmann´s Stories and others. Between 1987 and 1991, he worked in Vienna´s Volksoper. Since the end of the 1980´s, he has been performing abroad and his voice has found its excelled primarily in the Slavonic operas: Laca in Janáček´s Jenufa in the State Opera Berlin (in Geneve, Venezia, Gent, Antwerpen, at the National Theatre in Prague a.o.), Kudrjáš in Janáček´s Káťa Kabanova in Geneve (Paris, Dallas and Tel Aviv), Živný in Janáček´s The Fate in Prague (2002) and in Madrid (2003), Zinovij Ismailov in Shostakovitch Katerina Ismailova in Venezia, Geneve and Dresden a.o.


  • Anton REJCHA

    (* 26.2.1770 Praha - † 28.5.1836 Paříž)

    český skladatel a teoretik, působící v cizině

    Czech composer and theorist living abroad

    At the age of 11, he was adopted by his uncle Josef Rejcha, a violoncellist in the band in Germany. He studied flute, violinist and piano. From 1785 to 1794, he worked with his uncle as flutist and violist in the Duke´s band in Bonn where he met Beethoven. He visited the University and studied the music theory of his time. He lived in Hamburg (1794-99), later in Paris (1799-1802) and Vienna (1802-08). He met with many famous musicians and he acquired favor of many musicians of the Court. He wrote more than 50 compositions. After a short stay in Leipzig, he returned to live in Paris (from 1808). From 1818, he became a teacher at the Conservatory and he blended into the French milieu. Hector Berlioz, Caesar Franck, Charles Gounod and privately Franz Liszt belonged to his pupils. He wrote many piano works i.e. important collection of 36 fugues, chamber compositions for different instruments (wind quintets are very known), several symphonies, concerts (also for the glass harmonica), songs, songs with orchestra and approximately 15 scenic works. Some of them were performed (i.e. L'Ouragan, about 1801 in Vienna, Argine, regina di Granata in Vienna (1802), Cagliostro in Paris (1810), Natalie, ou La Famille russe in Paris (1816), Sapho in Paris (1822). His theoretic works (about melodic, harmony, composing and drama) written between 1814-1833 have a great influence to the all generation of composers. They were edited in French and in German language; they were read also in Czech Lands.


  • Ivo ŽÍDEK

    (* 4.6.1926 Kravaře - † 19.5.2003 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - tenor


  • Jan NOVÁK

    (* 8.4.1921 Nová Říše - † 11.11.1984 Neu-Ulm)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    He studied at the Monastery School in Velehrad where he aquired the knowledge of Latin, later continued his studied at the Conservatory in Brno. He was deported during the Second War. After the war, he continued in studies at the Prague Academy of Performing Arts with Pavel Bořkovec and at the Janáček Academy of Performing Arts in Brno with Vilém Petrželka. In 1947, he received a Scholarship from the Ježek Foundation in USA with Aaron Copland, later continued with Bohuslav Martinů in New York who influenced him significantly. From 1948, he lived and worked in Brno as a composer and pianist. In 1963, he co-founded the Creative Groupe A in Brno, that was focused on the art of composition and theory of contemporary music. After occupation of the Czechoslovakia in 1968, he moved to the Denmark. Between 1970 and 1977, he worked as a teacher and choirmaster in Italian Roverto. From 1977, he taught at the Musikhochschule in Stuttgart. He has counted among the must gifted Czech artists of the period following the 2nd War. He was inspired by Moravian folklore, jazz and New Music (ca 1960) and also by his experience in the theatre. In his compositions, he used Latin, as can be found in 12 Collections of Songs, 9 Collections of Choirs, cantatas Dido (1967), Ignis pro Ioanum Palach (1969) as well as ballets with texts, in the stage music. His later work included six instrumental concerts and almost 25 instrumental and chamber compositions. His work has been released by the editorial house G. Zanibon Padua, Supraphon and Panton.
    www.musica.cz/novakj/


  • Eduard Francevič NÁPRAVNÍK

    (* 24.8.1839 Býšť - † 10.11.1916 Petrohrad)

    český dirigent a skladatel, působící v Rusku

    Czech conductor and composer living in Russia.

    He studied in the School for Organists in Prague with Karel F. Pitsch and František Blažek, instrumentation privately with Johann Friedrich Kittl. He worked primarily as a teacher and publicist. From 1861, he worked in Peterburg as the Kapellmeister of the Jusupovov Orchestra. From 1863, he was engaged in the Tsar´s Opera (Mariinskij teatr) in Peterburg, first as an assistant of Kapellmeister, then as organist and répétiteur, and as second from 1867 and as first Kapellmeister from 1869. He assimilated into the Russian milieu and became an important personality of Russian music life where he contributed to the great artistic level of Russian opera. He studied many premieres of Russian music such as Dargomyžskij, Rimskij-Korsakov, Musorgsky, Rubinstein, a well as several operas of Tschaikovsky: Stone Guest [Kamennyj gosť] (1872), Pskoviťanka (1873), Boris Godunov (1874), The Demon (1875), The Queen of Spides (1890), Iolanta (1892) as well as fundamental operas of the European contemporary repertoire. He premiered two Czech operas in Russia: in 1871 Smetana´s The Bartered Bride, in 1900 Smetana´s Dalibor. He also conducted symphonic concerts among others in the Tsar´s Russian Music Society. He wrote many instrumental compositions and choiral, chamber music, 4 symphonies, collections of dance pieces, orchestral pieces and 4 operas: Nižegorodcy (1869 in Peterburg; in Czech language 1875 in Prague), Garold (1886 in Peterburg; 1888 in Czech language as Harold in Prague), Dubrovskij (1895 in Peterburg; 1896 in Czech language in Prague with many reprises), Francesca da Rimini (1902 in Peterburg).


  • Jan RYCHLÍK

    (* 27.4.1916 Praha - † 20.1.1964 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    Jan Rychlik was a musician of universal outlook. Well-versed in jazz and folklore, he studied composition in which he put to use classical principles while taking inspiration from New Music. He worked for the film and theatre but also authored a number of chamber and vocal compositions, which reflect his artistic profile. Having displayed his interest in the winds, he subsequently produced such theoretical works as Modern Instrumentation. The most known composition is his African Cycle for eight wind instruments and piano (1961, CD Arta Accords).

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Jakobus GALLUS (HANDL)

    (* 3.7.1550 Ribnica - † 18.7.1951 Praha)

    slovinský skladatel

    Composer

    He was educated in the Stična Monastery (in German Sittich). From 1568, he lived in monasteries in Austria. In 1574, he became a member of Court Chapel in Vienna, around 1578, he traveled throughout the Czech countries to the cities of Znojmo, Brno, Zábrdovice, Olomouc, Kroměříž, Prague, and Rakovník, and also in Silesian (Wroclaw, Breslau and other cities). From 1579 to July 1585, he was employed by Bishop Stanislav Pavlovsky, and later entered into the Jesuit Order in 1581. In 1585, he moved to Prague and was the director of the choir in the Church of St. Johannes in Vado until his death. He maintained a good social status and he met with Prague Court officials. He belonged to famous composers of vocal polyphony. He composed four books of masses (dedicated to her religious Superiors), four books of motets Opus musicum, passions, madrigals, odes and smaller ecclesiastical and profane compositions. His music continues in Venezian tradition. His compositions have a full sound, brave harmony and have an apt connection between music declamation of Latin text and their message. The compositions had edited in Prague by Nigrin from 1579 to the end of his life. They stayed partly in manuscripts and after they were edited in new editions.


  • Jiří JORAN

    (* 20.6.1920 Praha - † 5.8.2011 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - baryton


  • Ivan KUSNJER

    (* 10.11.1951 Rokycany)

    český operní pěvec - baryton

    Czech baritone

    He studied in Prague at the Academy of Performing Arts with Teodor Šrubař and in various courses for vocalists in Italy. From 1977, he worked in Ostrava, 1981-82 in Brno, and since 1982, at the National Theatre in Prague. He has a baritone voice with a large register and lyrical character. He primarily asserts himself in the Italian repertoire, such as Figaro in Rossini´s The Barber from Sevilla, in Verdi´s operas Troubadour (as Count Luna), Don Carlos (as Marquis Posa), La Traviata (as Germont), Otello, Rigoletto and Macbeth, Scarpia in Puccini´s Tosca and many others. He is an excellent interpreter of Czech operatic roles including Vladislav in Smetana´s Dalibor, Tausendmark in Smetana´s Brandenbourgers in Bohemia, Vok Vítkovic in Smetana´s The Devil´s Wall, Game Warden in Janáček´s The Cunning Little Vixen; he is also and excellent interpreter of modern works such as P. Maxwell Davies´s Eight Songs for a Mad King, Eben´s Jeremias and others. He has performed abroad especially in Janáček´s operas (in Paris, Madrid, Lisabon, Venezia, Bruxelles, Milan, Berlin and other places). He is a preferred concert singer.


  • Jiří BĚLOHLÁVEK

    (* 24.2.1946 Praha - † 31.5.2017 Praha)

    dirigent

    He studied violoncello and conducting with Bohumír Liška, Alois Klíma and Robert Brock at the Prague Conservatory and the Academy of Performing Arts. He graduated from the Master Courses with Sergio Celibidache. In 1971 he became a finalist of the Karajan Competition in Berlin. Since this time, he has regularly been a visiting conductor of many European and overseas orchestras. From 1972 he became the conductor of Brno Philharmonic Orchestra, from 1977 to 1989 he was the chief-conductor of the Prague Symphony Orchestra. Through hiw devotion, he has helped the orchestra acquire an international prestige (in Europa, Japan, USA). Since 1973 he has been the visiting conductor in the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra and from 1981, he has been the permanent conductor of it, between 1990-92 he was the chief-conductor. In 1994 he founded the Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, an orchestra of young musicians. From 1995 to 2000 he was a guest conductor, and since 2005 he has been the chief conductor of the BBC Orchestra. Since 1979 he has been working in theatre: i.e. Comic Opera in Berlin, National Theatre in Prague, Metropolitan Opera in New York (i.e. Wagner's Tristan and Isolda in 2003). He participates in many festivals, such as in Glyndebourne with Janáček's Jenůfa, which was awarded with Barclay’s Theatre Award in London. In 1995 he became a professor of conducting at the Prague Academy of Performing Arts. J. Bělohlávek has received many awards for performances of the works of Martinů and. With the Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra he studied many chamber Czech works (including Novák, Suk and Dvořák).


  • Josef BERG

    (* 8.3.1927 Brno - † 26.2.1971 Brno)

    skladatel a spisovatel


  • Záviš of ZÁPY

    (* 1.1.1350 Praha - † 1.1.1411 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Bohemian composer

    He studied at the Prague University, where he completed his Master degree in the Liberal Arts in 1381. He lived in Rome, he was a canon in Olomouc between 1394 and 1396, in Prague from 1397 to 1402, and later again in Olomouc. Originally, he was follower of Jan Hus but turned agains him in 1410. In 1411, he was appointed Doctor of Theology. The evens of life after this time are not known. Many historians are doubtful about his identity. Five interesting written compositions under his name have been preserved: four ecclesiastic compositions in the Vyšehrad Manuscript, love song Jižť mne vše radost ostává in the Třeboň Manuscript, as well as others.


  • František Xaver BRIXI

    (* 2.1.1732 Praha - † 4.10.1771 Praha)

    český skladatel a varhaník

    He came from a large music family. From 1744 to 1749 he studied at the famous Piarist School in Kosmonosy. In 1749, he became an organist in the church of St. Gallus and later in other temples in Prague. In 1759, he was awarded a prestigious position as an organist and regenschori in the cathedral of St. Vitus Cathedral in Prague. He died prematurely. The transcriptions of his compositions have appeared in many Czech choirs as well as in Bavaria, Austria, Poland and Hungary. He wrote approximately 400 works – about 290 spiritual works (100 masses), music to school dramas, music to the Latin plays, which are currently performed (Erat unum cantor bonus, Luridi scholars), chamber and organ compositions and few sinfonies. He belongs to the must important Czech composers of 2nd half of 18th Century.

    www.mujweb.cz/www/brixi/english/biographyfxben.htm


  • Maria TAUBEROVÁ

    (* 28.4.1911 Vysoké Mýto - † 16.1.2003 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Soprano

    She was the wife of Jroslav Krombholz, conductor of the National Theatre. She studied music in Vienna, singing in Milan and Prague with Professors L. Ripper and F. Carpi. During the years 1936–73, she was a fundamental personality of the ensemble of the National Theatre in Prague where she studied about fifty roles of classical authors such as Mozart, Verdi, Strauss, Smetana, Dvořák. She also sang in the operas of contemporary music i.e. operas of Pavel Bořkovec, Otakar Ostrčil and Bohuslav Martinů (Julietta in 1963). She has a flexible coloratura soprano and the attractive image. From 1933 to 1935 she played in some films. She guested in many foreign countries and sang in oratorios and song-concerts. She recorded many compositions for Supraphon label and a Radio.


  • Eduard HAKEN

    (* 22.3.1910 Šklíň - † 21.1.1996 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - bas

    He studied in Luck in Ukraine, where he performed in the children choirs. During his medical studies in Prague (1929–1932), he also studied singing with Dimitr Levytsky, Friedrich Plaschke and A. Granforte. From 1936, he sang basso roles in the National Theatre in Prague. From 1938, he performed in the Opera in Olomouc (he debuted as jailer Beneš in Smetana's Dalibor. From 1941 to 1991, he was a prominent bass vocalist in the National Theatre in Prague.

    His bass voice had a large register with a broad scale of abilities of expression. He created approximately 70 roles in the National Theatre in Prague. He shone in the comic roles (from 1943, he premiered as Kecal in Smetana's The Bartered Bride, later Mumlal in Smetana's Two Widows, Basilio in Rossini's  The Barber from Sevilla, Osmin in Mozart's The Abduction from Seraglio and others, later he sang more serious roles, such as Water Goblin in Dvořák's Rusalka, Grigoris in Martinů's Greek Passion, Paloucký in Smetana's The Kiss, Svätopluk in Suchoň's Svätopluk, Ivan Susanin in Glinka's Ivan Susanin, Don Quijote in Massenet's Don Quijote and Gremin in Tchaikovsky's Eugen Onegin, and the sarcastic Mephistopheles in Gounod's Faust and others). For almost forty years, he was one of the most attractive persons of the opera in the National Theatre in Prague.


  • Eva RANDOVÁ

    (* 31.12.1936 Kolín)

    česká operní pěvkyně - mezzosoprán

    Czech mezzo-soprano

    She was originally a teacher. She first studied singing privately, later at the Prague Conservatory. In 1962, she debuted in Kladno. From 1963 to 1969, she was engaged as a mezzo-soprano in Ostrava, from 1969 to 1970, at the National Theatre in Prague. In 1970, she began performing abroad, first in Stuttgart. From 1973, she performed in Bayreuth in the Wagner´s operas (among others as Fritzka in The Rheingold, Waltraute in Walkyre, Ortrud in Lohengrin, Kundry in Parsifal). From 1975, she performed at the festival in Salzburg (as Eboli in Verdi´s Don Carlos under the conducting by Herbert von Karajan), from 1977 as Ortrud in Lohengrin, Azucena in Troubadour and other roles). In 1981, she performed in the Metropolitan Opera in New York as Fritzka in The Rheingold, Venusse in Tannhäuser. During the 1980´s , she performed on some of the most important European stages with Czech repertoire, including Kostelnička in Janáček´s Jenufa, Kabanicha in Janáček´s Káťa Kabanova, Amneris in Verdi´s Aida, Ulrica in Verdi´s Masquerade, Santuzza in Mascagni´s Cavalleria rusticana, Marina in Musorgski´s Boris Godunov, Klytaimnestra in Strauss´s Electra) and others. From 1995 to 1998, she was the director of the State Opera Prague.


  • Luděk VELE

    (* 30.11.1951 Turnov)

    český operní pěvec - baryton

    Czech baritone

    He studied at the Conservatory in Prague with Jaroslav Horáček. From 1975 to 1983, he was engaged in Liberec (he debuted as Lutobor in Smetana´s Libusse), and since 1983 has been singing in the National Theatre. He has a large repertoire, which he has also performed in Germany, Poland, Spain, Canada and Israel (Leporello and Don Giovanni in Mozart´s Don Giovanni; Basilio in Rossini´s The Barber from Sevilla, Caspar in Weber´s Freischütz, Mefistofeles in Gounod´s Faust, Filip II. InVerdi´s Don Carlos, Kecal in Smetana´s The Bartered Bride, Chrudoš in Smetana´s Libusse, Water sprite in Dvořák´s Rusalka; Game Warden in Janáček´s The Cunning Little Vixen, Baron Ochs in Strauss´s Rose Cavalier and others.


  • Marta KRÁSOVÁ

    (* 6.3.1901 Protivín - † 20.2.1970 Vráž u Berouna)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Czech soprano

    She studied in České Budějovice, singing with Bohuslav Jeremiáš. She continued her studies with Olga Valoušková, Růžena Maturová, Ludmila Neumannová, Konrad Wallerstein and in Vienna with M. Ullanowsky. From 1922, she worked at the Slovakian National Theatre in Bratislava as a mezzo-soprano. She sang Anežka in Smetana´s Two Widows, Foreign Ducheness in Dvořák´s Rusalka, Dalila in Saint-Saëns´s Samson and Dalila, Octavian in Strauss´s Rose Cavalier. From 1928 to 1966, she was a member of the National Theatre. Her voice had an extraordinary range from contra-alto to the dramatic soprano. She had perfect vocal technique and gift as a dramatic performer. She performed in Vienna, Berlin, Hamburg, Dresden, Madrid, Paris, Moskow, Warszawa, as well as in the USA and Canada. She was an ideal interpreter of mezzo-soprano roles from the Czech repertoire (Virgin Rosa in Smetana´s The Secret, Witch in Dvořák´s Rusalka, Donna Isabela in Fibich´s The Bride from Messina, Kostelnička in Janáček´s Jenůfa, Kabanicha in Janáček´s Káťa Kabanová) and she was also excellent in other roles such as Orfeus in Gluck´s Orfeus and Eurydice, Amneris in Verdi´s Aida, Eboli in Verdi´s Don Carlos, Carmen in Bizet´s Carmen, Ortruda in Wagner´s Lohengrin, Ariadna in Strauss´s Ariadne on Naxos, just to name a few.


  • Milada MARKOVÁ

    (* 24.5.1913 Brno - † 29.10.1986 Olomouc)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Czech soprano

    She studied singing at the Conservatory in Brno with Marie Fleischerová from 1929 to 1935. She was engaged in Olomouc practically almost her entire life (from 1935 to 1971) with a short interruption in the 1930´s, when she was engaged in the Slovakian Theatre in Bratislava. She sang primarily dramatic soprano roles such as Strauss´s Salome, Kostelnička and Kabanicha in Jenůfa, Emilia Marty in The Macropulos Case and others). She also worked as a teacher.


  • Zdeněk ZOUHAR

    (* 8.2.1927 Kotvrdovice - † 18.11.2011 Brno)

    český skladatel, pedagog a muzikolog


  • Václav SMETÁČEK

    (* 30.6.1906 Brno - † 18.2.1986 Praha)

    český dirigent, hobojista a skladatel

    Czech conductor, oboist and composer

    He studied at the Conservatory in Prague among others with Jaroslav Křička among others, conducting with Metod Doležil and Pavel Dědeček, musicology, aesthetics, and philosophy at the Charles University in Prague (he received his PhDr. in 1933). He was the founder and member of the Prague Wind Quintet (1928-56), with whom he performed, composed and arranged compositions for it. From 1930 to 1933, he was a member of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, from 1934 to 1943, he worked in the Czech Radio as conductor and editor, between 1942 and 1971 he was the chief conductor of the Prague Symphony Orchestra and later a guest conductor. From 1945, he was a pedagogue at the Prague Conservatory and Academy of Performing Arts. As a conductor of the Prague Symphony Orchestra he improved significantly the quality of this orchestra. He enlarged its repertoire especially with the music of 20th Century and larger vocal symphonic works (Rejcha, Mozart, Cherubini, Dvořák, Foerster, Martinů, Orff, Kabeláč, Luboš Fišer). From 1938, he performed abroad, and with the Prague Symphony Orchestra for first time in 1957. He was invited later to the many important European and overseas music centres. He primarily devoted himself to the concert music, but he also studied operas (i.e. in 1958 in Buenos Aires Smetana´s The Bartered Bride, Janáček´s Kaťa Kabanová, in 1967 Musorgski´s Boris Godunov, Shostakowich´s Katerina Ismailova; 1966 in Teatro La Scala Janáček´s From the Death House and many other works). He recorded many musical pieces (especially for the Supraphon label), and he also devoted himself to the journalism. As a conductor, he was pragmatic, ready and versatile. He was very good sense of the coordination of soloist and orchestra. He had a very good sense of coordination for solo performers and orchestras. He received many awards.


  • Radim HLADÍK

    (* 13.12.1946 Praha)

    český rockový kytarista, skladatel, producent, pedagog


  • Osvald CHLUBNA

    (* 22.7.1893 Brno - † 30.10.1971 Brno)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    He originally studied engineering and Commercial Academy in Brno. Between 1914 and 1924, he continued to study composition with Leoš Janáček. Until 1953, he worked as a clerk. He also taught at the Organ School in Brno and later at the Conservatory (1919–35, 1953–59) and at the Janáček Academy of Performing Arts (1956–58). He worked in many art organisations in Brno, such as the Club of Moravian Composers (1919-48). He was very prolific composer. He evolved from Romanticism, Impressionism to the Modern Constructivism. He also expressed his relationship to the Symbolism. He used the texts of symbolic Czech poets, such as Otakar Březina, Jaroslav Vrchlický, Jaroslav Durych and others. He wrote several cycles of compositions for piano and organ, as well as instrumental concerts, symphonies, ouvertures and cantatas. He wrote many operas, often using his own librettos, such as The Revenge of Catullus based on the work of Vrchlický, comp. in 1917, 1921 in Brno), Alladina and Palomid (based on the work of Maeterlinck, 1925 Brno), Ňura (1932 Brno), How the Death came in the World (a scenic mystery, 1936 Brno), Jiří from Kunštát and Poděbrady (based on the work of Alois Jirásek, composed 1941-42), Cradle (composed on the work of Jirásek, composed 1951-52), Eupyros (comp. 1960-62). He also wrote texts and articles primarily about Janáček.


  • Karel VELEBNÝ

    (* 17.3.1931 Praha - † 7.3.1989 Praha)

    český jazzový skladatel a multiinstrumentalista

    Jazz player, multiinstrumentalist, composer, arranger, actor and publicist

    He absolved the Conservatory. After he became a member of Karel Krautgarner´s Orchestra (1955-58). He influenced the evolution of modern jazz in Czechoslovakia especially in the ensemble SHQ. He played tenorsaxophone, vibraphone or piano. Due to his heart malady he stoped play wind instruments and continued play vibraphon or piano. He was awarded as a vibraharpist. He has played in many formations: i.e. with E. Olmerová. He composed more that 200 compositions, he was an author of the music to the films: Dobří lidé nevymřeli (Good People didn´t Die out yet), Dvojitý Nelson (Double Nelson), Jednorukého píseň (Song of One-Handed Man), Oživení (Pick up) and others. He found his inspiration especially in modern post-bop mainstream. He also worked with folk music (disc Týnom tánom). He was a cofounder of the theatre of Jára Cimrman (1967).


  • Dalibor VAČKÁŘ

    (* 19.9.1906 Korčula - † 21.10.1984 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer and writer, son of Vácalv Vačkář

    He studied violin with Reissig and Hoffmann, comsition with Šín and Suk. He played the violin in the Prague radio orchestra in 1934-35, worked as a film dramatist (1945-47).


  • Antonín ŠVORC

    (* 12.2.1934 Jaroměř - † 21.2.2011 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - basbaryton


    Czech baritone

    He worked in Liberec, from the 1956 in the National Theatre, after he continued as a member of Berlin State Opera. He has been a specialist for Wagnerian roles. He became apparent also in the roles of other heroic tenors. He guested in many countries: in Germany, Swiss, France, Spain or Poland.


  • Josef Bohuslav FOERSTER

    (* 30.12.1859 Praha - † 29.5.1951 Nový Vestec)

    český hudební skladatel, publicista a pedagog

    He is an important member of the generation of Czech music composing between the wars. He studied at the Prague Organ School, 1882-8 he worked as an organist by the Church of St. Vojtěch, 1889-94 as a choirmaster by the Church of Panna Maria Sněžná, he was also a teacher of singing and a writer for the paper Národní listy.

    After his moving to Hamburg with his wife soprano Berta Lauterer, he worked as a music critic writer and piano teacher at the conservatory. In 1903 they moved to Vienna.

    Foerster taught at Vienna Conservatory and wrote for many music journals.

    As a composer, he was very popular for his choirs: Oráč (Ploughman), Velké širé rodné lány (Large Homelands), Polní cestou (On the Field Path), Z osudu rukou (From the Hands of Fate).

    From the year 1897 he became a member of Czech Academy of Sciences, in 1931-39 in the function of its president.

    He wrote also six operas (Eva, Debora, Jessika, Bloud/Heart, Naïve Person, Nepřemožení). The opera Eva (1897) opened the way to the Czech Realism.

    He wrote also many volumes of memories: Poutník (Pilgrim, 1929), Poutníkovy cesty (Pilgrim's Ways, 1932), Poutník v Hamburku (Pilgrim in Hamburg, 1938), Poutník v cizině (Pilgrim abroad, 1947).


  • Milada ŠUBRTOVÁ

    (* 24.5.1924 Lhota u Kralovic - † 1.8.2011 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán


    Czech soprano

    She studied with the tenor Zdeněk Knittl. In 1958 he absolved a course with baritone Apollo Granforte. After second war she started to work in the Great Opera of 5th May in Prague that in the year 1948 was integrated to the National Theatre. She had a splendid performer of Krasava, Jenůfa or Rusalka. Her voice has been very vived. He recorded very often for many publishing houses.

    Recordings - choice

    Milada Šubrtová: Opera recital
    (Arias by Dvorak, Smetana, Ryba, Blodek, Foerster, Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Offenbach, Charpentier, Verdi)
    CD, Supraphon

    Dvořák: Armida - Multisonic

    Antonín Dvořák: Rusalka
    Orchestra and choir of the National Theatre, conductor: Zdeněk Chalabala
    2 CD, Supraphon

    Leoš Janáček: Její pastorkyňa (Jenůfa)
    Orchestra and choir of the National Theatre, conductor: Jaroslav Vogel
    CD, Supraphon

    Bedřich Smetana: Brandenburgers in Bohemia
    Orchestra and choir of the National Theatre, conductor: Jan Hus Tichý
    2 CD, Supraphon


  • Rafael KUBELÍK

    (* 29.6.1914 Býchory - † 11.8.1996 Kastanienbaum)

    český dirigent a skladatel


    Czech conductor, composer and pianist

    Rafael Kubelik studied violin, composition and conducting at the Prague Conservatory. He was also an outstanding pianist, and partner of his famous father, the violin virtuoso Jan Kubelík, on many concert tours. He first conducted the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in 1934. After Talich left for the National Theatre, Kubelík became chief conductor of Czech Philharmonic. Unwilling to come to terms with the new political situation in the country after 1948, Kubelik emigrated. In 1949 was elected music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra with which he stayed until 1953. His other engagements included the Covent Garden Opera (1955-1958), the Bavarian Radio Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera in New York (1972). On 1973, Kubelik obtained Swiss citizenship. He, however, never forgot his homeland and shortly after communistic crash returned to conduct the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra at the memorable concert of mutual understanding in Prague s Old Town Square in 1990. He has since appeared as guest with the orchestra in Prague on several occasions, and conducted Smetana's My Country performed by the Czech Philharmonic in Tokyo for which they won the prize for best concert of the year. He also composed choral works (Kantata beze slov (Cantata without words)), chamber, and orchestral compositions (Orphikon). He also applied himself to opera (Veronika).

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Jan MRÁČEK

    (* 9.7.1991 Plzeň)

    český houslista


  • Kryštof HARANT of Polžice

    (* 1.1.1564 Klenová - † 21.6.1621 Praha)

    český renesanční skladatel, zpěvák, spisovatel, cestovatel a diplomat

    The day of his birth is exactly unknown. He was studying music of Netherlandish polyphony. His compositions were performed especially at the German courts. The seven pieces survived. He took part in army in the Turkish wars 1593-97. In 1597 he set out with the knight Heřman Černín on a pilgrimage to he Holy Land and Egypt.

    He described his experiences in a book which contains also his six-part motet Qui confidunt in Domino (written 1598 in Jerusalem). After his return to Prague, he became valet to the Emperor Rudolf II. He served him until 1612. In 1615 he was released from his duties and he went at Pecka Castle. He kept here a musical establishment. He was converted in 1618 to neoutraquism. In 1620, he took part in the Bohemian noble revolt. He was arrested and condemned to death, beheaded in the Old Town Square. His work was edited in the book Opera Musica (1956).

    Bibliography:
    R. Quoika: Christoph Harant von Poschitz und seine Zeit, in Musikforschung, pp. 414-429.


  • Roman PATOČKA

    (* 1.1.1981 Jihlava)

    český houslista


  • Josef PÁLENÍČEK

    (* 19.7.1914 Travnik - † 7.3.1991 Praha)

    český klavírista a skladatel

    Czech pianist and composer


  • František Vincenc KRAMÁŘ-KROMMER

    (* 27.11.1795 Kamenice - † 8.1.1831 Vídeň)

    český skladatel, dirigent, představitel českého hudebního klasicismu


    Bohemian composer, conductor and concert master

    F. Kramar (also known as Krommer) after he completed his studies went, like many others, to Vienna and the Hungarian Lands, where he gained his expirience. He made use of these experiences as a concert master in the Bratislava group of Count Grassalkovic and, after the death of L. Koželuh, as a composer and conductor in the Prince's court in Vienna. Kramař's style developed from the Vienna classics and popular Czech folk elements of the time. He composed 5 symphonies, 10 concertos (notable are the oboe and clarinet), much chamber music, and masses. His compositions for wind instruments and ensembles are especially original.

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Berta FOERSTEROVÁ-LAUTEREROVÁ

    (* 11.1.1869 Praha - † 9.4.1936 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    She was the wife of composer Josef Bohuslav Foerster.

    She studied singing in Prague from her children's years, and between 1883 to 1887, she studied at the Prague Conservatory.

    In 1887, she made her debut at the National Theatre in Prague as Agata in Weber's Der Freischütz. She was engaged here until 1893. In 1888, she was the first Desdemona in the Czech premiere of Verdi's Otello, Tatiana in Czech premiere of Tchaikovsky Eugen Onegin where was composer in attendance.

    She sang most of soprano roles of the Czech repertoire at the National Theatre (Smetana, Dvořák; Foerster's Debora). From 1893 she was engaged in Hamburg, where she cooperated with Gustav Mahler. In 1901, Mahler engaged her to the Court Opera in Vienna, where she finished her career in 1913. From 1918, she lived in Prague where she often still held concerts. Her repertoire included almost 50 roles (including the Wagnerian roles of Venus and Elisabeth in Tannhäuser, Elsa in Lohengrin, Eva in Masters Singers from Norimberg.


  • Josef ŠPAČEK

    (* 1.1.1986 Třebíč)

    český houslista


  • Hedvika ŠVENDOVÁ

    (* 23.5.1996 Brandýs nad Orlicí)

    česká kytaristka


  • Lucie KAŠPÁRKOVÁ

    (* 20.2.1981 Zlín)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Biography:
    She works in the State Theatre in Košice.
    Cooperation – National Theatre Brno, J. K. Tyl Theatre in Pilsen, F. X. Šalda Theatre in Liberec, National Moravian-Silesian Theatre in Ostrava, Ensemble Opera Diversa.

    Studies:
    Conservatory in Brno (Blanka Morávková); Janáček Academy of Performing Arts in Brno (Jarmila Hladíková); private lessons with Magdalena Blahušiaková and Martin Bárta; Der Internationale Opernkurs in Beeskow Oder Spree (2004); master courses with Antonio Carangelo, Jürgen Hartfiel, František Drs and Magdalena Blahušiaková (2011); Baroque courses of Barbara Maria Willi (2004).

    Repertoire (selection):
    B. Smetana, A. Dvořák, G. Puccini, G. Verdi, R. Strauss, F. Poulenc, L. Janáček, W. A. Mozart, J. Haydn, S. Prokofiev, C. Debussy.

    Festivals:
    Festival Janáček Brno (2008, 2010, 2012), Smetana’s Litomyšl (2014), Opera 2013, Třebíč Opera Festival (2012).

    YouTube:
    Bedřich Smetana: The Kiss (2014); Pavel Drábek, Ondřej Kyas: Dýňový démon ve vegetariánské restauraci (2013).

    Reviews:
    "Young Czech soprano Lucie Kašpárková has the ability to shape her lyrical soprano dynamically and reach firm tones in high pitches." (Opera plus, March 24, 2013).

    Links:
    www.luciekasparkova.com

    Contact:
    e-mail: lucie.kasparkova@gmail.com


  • Miloš HORÁK

    (* 1.1.1976 Mladá Boleslav)

    český operní pěvec - basbaryton

    Biography:
    He works in the National Theatre in Prague. Cooperation -  South Bohemian Theatre in České Budějovice, J. K. Tyl Theatre in Pilsen, Czech Philharmonic, Brno Philharmonic, Pilsen Philhamonic, South Czech Philharmonic České Budějovice, State Theatre Košice, Bohdan Warchal Chamber Orchestra and others.

    Studies:
    Private lessons with Prof. René Tuček and doc. Katarína Bachmannové; private lessons and master courses with Prof. Nicolaus Hillebrand (Munich).

    Repertoire (selection):
    J. S. Bach, G. F. Händel, W. A. Mozart, G. Rossini, G. Verdi, G. Puccini, G. Bizet, R. Wagner, R. Strauss, B. Smetana, A. Dvořák, B. Martinů and others.

    Competitions:
    Antonín Dvořák International Singing Competition in Karlovy Vary (2008, finals).

    Festivals:
    Prague Spring; Smetana's Litomyšl; Opera festival; Zomeropera Alden Biesen festival, Belgium.

    Reviews, articles etc.:
    "A vast and really breakdown vocal capacity with nice Fs-sharp in the opening Alfio's song about a horse. The young singer, René Tuček's private student, has been cast in bass roles or higher bass roles such as Mozart's Figaro. However, Alfio is a typical baritone part. I had a feeling that it suited him well and the voice, which is in a higher pitch, sounds more resonant. I think that this role was a great choice. It was legendary Antonín Švorc and his professional orientation, who came to my mind when I heard Miloš Horák sing." (Opera Plus, December 11, 2013).

    Links:
    www.miloshorak.cz; www.narodni-divadlo.cz

    Contact:
    e-mail: horak27@seznam.cz


  • Kateřina JAVŮRKOVÁ

    (* 20.6.1991 Praha)

    česká hráčka na lesní roh


  • Josef ŠKARKA

    (* 1.1.1981 Brno)

    český operní pěvec - bas

    Biography: Cooperation - National Theatre in Prague, National Theatre in Brno, Slovak National Theatre in Bratislava, J. K. Tyl Theatre in Pilsen, Silesian Theatre Opava, South Bohemian Theatre in České Budějovice, North Bohemian Theatre of Opera and Ballet in Ústí nad Labem, Opéra national de Lorraine, Teatro Comunale di Modena, Teatro Municipale di Piacenza, Duo Skarka–Pohl and others.

    Studies: Conservatory in Brno (Jurij Gorbunov and Petr Julíček), Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (Miloslav Podskalský), master courses with Gabriela Beňačková, José Cura, Tom Krause, Peter Dvorský and others.

    Repertoire (selection): W. A. Mozart, A. Dvořák, G. Paisiello, J. S. Bach, G. Puccini, G. Verdi, P. Haas, I. Stravinsky, G. Rossini, L. Janáček, J. B. Foerster, G. Mahler, J. J. Offenbach, B. Martinů, L. Sommer, O. Kvěch, M. Ivanović, B. Smetana, C. M. von Weber.

    Competitions: Antonín Dvořák International Singing Competition in Karlovy Vary (2009), special award of the National Theatre in Brno, Czech Radio Award (2nd prize in the opera category); Jakub Pustina International Singing Competition (2013, 1st prize).

    Festivals: Moravian Autumn (2004), Composition awards Janáček – Revueltas (2008, Mexico City), international film festival Mezipatra (2010), international festival Mahler–Jihlava (2010), Smetana's Litomyšl (2011) and others.

    Recordings:
    B. Martinů: Le Jour de Bonté (2010, Arco Diva).

    YouTube:
    W. A. Mozart: Madamina, il catalogo questo / Don Giovanni (2009);
    Pavel Trojan Jr.: Milicius (2014) and others.

    Reviews, articles:
    "Josef Škarka sang the role of Figaro very well and his performance is promising and we should pin our hopes to it." (Opus Musicum, 2011).

    Links:
    https://www.facebook.com/josefskarka.official?ref=hl
    https://twitter.com/josefskarka
    www.josefskarka.cz

    Contact:
    e-mail: josefskarka@live.com


  • Antonín DVOŘÁK

    (* 8.9.1841 Nelahozeves - † 1.5.1904 Praha)

    český skladatel, violista a dirigent

    Antonín Dvořák was born in Nelahozeves, a small Bohemian village near Prague. His father was an inn-keeper and butcher but he also played the zithar. Dvořák took his first singing and violin lessons at the village school. At the age of 14 he was sent to Zlonice to learn German but he prefered music lessons. He was learning the organ, viola, piano and basic composition with Antonin Liehmann. His interest in music was such that his father allowed him to enrol at the Prague Organ School in 1857 where he received the strict training of a church musician but also attended many concerts of his contemporaries. From 1857 he played viola in the Cecilia Society concerts. After graduation from the Prague Organ School in 1859, Dvořák joined the band of Komzák, which formed later Provisional Theatre Orchestra as head violist (for a time conducted by Smetana). Though this was a steady job Dvořák needed more income. He taught music to girls from rich families including Anna Cermakova, who he married in 1873. Because of the lack of free time Dvořák finally gave up the orchestra to compose full time in 1871. In 1874-1877 Dvořák won the Austrian National Prize several times and received a much needed cash prize, but more importantly he won the respect and the friendship of Brahms who was one of the judges in the competition. Brahms recommended to his publisher Fritz Simrock in Berlin to publish some of Dvořák's works, and considered him an extraordinarily talented artist (Dvořák was 37 at that time). Simrock commissioned the first set of Slavonic Dances in 1878, which launched Dvořák´s international reputation. From 1874 to 1877 Dvořák also played organ at the church of St. Vojtěch in the New Town of Prague. In 1884 Dvořák took his first of nine visits to London to conduct his Stabat Mater (1876-77) which had scored a tremendous success the previous year. His popularity in Britain was immediate and sustained both as composer and conductor. Many of his works, such as his Seventh (1884-85) and Eighth (1889) Symphonies, the cantata Svatební košile (The Spectre's Bride, 1884), the oratorio St Ludmila (1885-6) and the Requiem (1890) were composed for or first performed in England. In 1891 he recieved an honorary doctorate of music from Cambridge University. In 1891, Dvořák was appointed professor of composition at the Prague Conservatory. He soon left this position to take up the offer of the position of Directorship of the National Conservatory of Music in New York. Two of his most famous works, the Symphony No. 9 in E Minor (1893), titled From the New World, and the best known of his string quartets, Quartet No. 12 in F Major (1893), so-called the "American Quartet", were composed in the U.S. Both of these works made use of themes influenced by American Indian folk melodies and Negro Spirituals. The New World Symphony derived some inspiration from a Czech translation of Longfellow's poem Hiawatha. Dvořák would later admit that the melancholy of these works could be attributed to the homesickness he felt during his time in America. In 1895 just before leaving America, he produced one of his most remarkable symphonic works Cello Concerto in B Minor. Returning to Prague with great relief, Dvořák resumed his position at the Prague Conservatory, and in 1901 became the director. His pupils include his son-in-law Josef Suk, and Vítězslav Novák. Dvořák died from a short illness on the 1st of May 1904 at the age of sixty-two. He is buried in Prague at the Vyšehrad.

    Dvořák exercised a great gift for absorbing folk styles and reproducing them in the context of the Classical tradition. His music is marked by its variety, complexity and versatility. After a period of compositions in German style, Dvořák´s works reflect his deep national consciousness. He is loved for his skill at adapting his native Bohemian folk dances and songs, such as the furiant, polka, skočná, dumka, and sousedská, for use in his compositions, and also for his all Slavonic orientation. Dvořák´s music is notable for a wide variety of genres. He wrote nine symphonies (1865-93) of which the best known must be the Symphony No. 9. The Seventh Symphony, often regarded as his best, powerfully expresses a mood of tragedy. In contrast, the Eight Symphony makes use of the folk melodies and colorful orchestration. The Symphony No. 1 in C Minor from 1865 is called "Zlonické zvony" (The Bells of Zlonice). Works for solo instrument and orchestra by Dvořák include a Cello Concerto in A Major (1865), a Violin Concerto in A Minor (1880) and a Piano Concerto in G Minor (1876) which make together with The Romance for Violin (1873-77), and Klid (The Silent Woods, 1893) for violoncello, important parts of solo repertoire for the instruments. Other orchestral works include two sets of Slavonic Dances (1878 and 1886), originally designed for piano duet, Serenade for Strings in E Major (1875), Symphonic Variations (1877), three Slavonic Rhapsodies (1878), Česká suita (Czech Suite, 1879), Legendy (Legends, 1881) also orchestrated by Dvořák from his original piano duet version, and Scherzo capriccioso (1883). Dvořák wrote five overtures, Můj domov (My Homeland, 1881), Husitská (Hussite, 1883), V přírodě (In Nature's Realm, 1891), Othello (1891-92), and Karneval (Carnival, 1891). Symphonic poems Vodník (The Water Goblin, 1896), Polednice (The Noon Witch, 1896), Zlatý kolovrat (The Golden Spinning Wheel, 1896), Holoubek (The Wild Dove, 1896) are written on K. J. Erben´s collection of folktales Kytice, Píseň bohatýrská (Heroic Song, 1897) has Dvořák´s own programme. From Dvořák´s eleven operas should be named Král a uhlíř (King and Charcoal Burner, 1871), Tvrdé palice (The Stubborn Lovers, 1874), a tragic opera Vanda (1875), Šelma sedlák (The Cunning Peasant, 1877), Dimitrij (1881-82), Jakobín (The Jacobin, 1887-88, rev. 1897), a comic opera Čert a Káča (The Devil and Kate, 1898-89) and a famous lyric fairy tale Rusalka from 1900. Choral works which won him such a following not only in late Victorian England are Stabat Mater, dramatic cantata after Erben The Spectre's Bride, oratorio St Ludmila, Mass in D (1887), Requiem, Te Deum (1892) and Hymnus (1872). Dvořák wrote many songs in number of sets, notably Cypřiše (Cypress Trees, 1865) to words by Pflager, Písně milostné (Love Songs, 1888), Večerní písně (Evening Songs, 1876, orch. 1882) on Hálek, Tři novořecké básně (Three Modern Greek Poems, 1878), Cigánské melodie (Gipsy Songs, 1880) including well-known Songs my Mother taught me and Biblické písně (Biblical Songs, 1894). Very popular is the set of Moravské dvojzpěvy (Moravian Duets, 1875-76), in his Z kytice národních písní slovanských (From a Bouquet of Slavonic Folksongs, 1877-78) and Kytice z českých národních písní (From a Bouquet of Czech Folksongs, 1877) we can see his folklore orientation. Notable from Dvořák´s chamber music are 14 string quartets, the American or Quartet no. 10 in E flat Major (1878-79), Slovanský (Slavonic) (1878-79), string quintets, String Sextet in A Major (1878), from 5 piano trios the Trio in E Minor nick-named Dumky (1890-91) is the best known, piano quartets and quintet, Maličkosti (Bagatelles, 1878) for 2 violins, cello and harmonium, Terzetto (1887) for 2 violins and viola, and Sonata (1880) and Sonatina (1893) for violin. Dvořák´s piano works include Siluety (Silhouettes, 1879), Poetické nálady (Poetic Tone Pictures, 1889), works inspired by folk dances Dumka and Furiant (1884), Dumka (1876 or 1878), Waltzes (1879-80), Mazurkas (1880) and Humoresques (1894, Humoresque No. 7 is the famous one), also piano duets - 16 Slavonic Dances (1878, 1886), Legends (1880-81) and Ze Šumavy (From the Bohemian Forest, 1883-84).

    Links:
    www.antonindvorak2004.cz
    www.dvorak-society.org
    dvorak.musicabona.com
    bohemia.tripod.com

    Biblography:
    K. Hoffmeister: Antonín Dvořák (Engl.transl.1928, orig. Prague, 1924)
    J. Burghauser: Antonín Dvořák (Engl.transl.1967, orig.Prague, 1966)
    O. Šourek: Dvořák´s Werke: ein vollständiges Verzeichnis (Berlin, 1917)
    O. Šourek: Antonín Dvořák (Engl.transl.1952, orig. Prague, 1929)
    O. Šourek: Antonín Dvořák: Letters and Reminiscences (Engl. transl. 1954, orig. Prague, 1938)
    V. Fischl, ed.: Antonín Dvořák: his Achievement (London, 1943)
    A. Robertson: Dvořák (London, 1945, 2.1964)
    J. Clapham: Dvořák (Newton Abbot, 1979)
    H. H. Schönzeler: Dvořák (London and New York, 1984)
    M. Beckerman, ed.: Dvořák and his World (Princeton, NJ, 1993)
    A. Hořejší: Antonín Dvořák: the Composer´s Life and Work in Pictures (Prague, 1955)
    J. H. Yoell: Antonín Dvořák on Records (New York, 1991)

    Discography:
    Orchestral
    8 Slavonic Dances, Op. 46, 8 Slavonic Dances, Op. 72
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Rafael Kubelik
    1 CD Decca
    Carnival - Concert Overture, Op. 92
    Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in A minor, Op. 53 (Allegro ma non troppo)
    Serenade for String Orchestra in E major, Op. 22 (Moderato)
    Concerto for Cello and Orchestra No. 2 in B minor, Op. 104 (Allegro)
    Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major, Series II, Op. 72
    Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88 (Allegretto grazioso)
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World", Op. 95 (Largo, Allegro con fuoco)
    Josef Suk - violin, Angelica May - cello
    Prague Philharmonia, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
    Karel Ancerl, Jiri Belohlavek, Vaclav Neumann - conductors
    CD Supraphon
    Carnival Overture, Op. 92, Symphonic Variations, Op. 78, Husitska Overture, Op. 67 (Hussite), Muj Domov Overture, Op. 62 (My Country), The Noon Witch, Op. 108, Othello Overture, Op. 93, The Golden Spinning Wheel (Zlaty kolovrat), Op.109, Overture In Nature's Realm, Op. 91
    London Symphony Orchestra, Istvan Kertesz
    2 CD Decca
    Carnival, Op. 92, Humoresque No. 7 in G flat major, Op. 101, Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major
    Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, Bohumil Kulinsky / Vaclav Smetacek
    CD Multisonic
    Cello Concerto in B minor op.104
    Mischa Maisky - Cello
    Israel Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Concert in A minor, Op. 53, Romance in F minor, Op. 11, Mazurek in E minor, Op. 49
    Frantisek Novotny - violin
    Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Studio Matous
    Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in A minor, Op. 53, Romance for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 11,
    Mazurek for Violin and Orchestra in E minor, Op. 49
    Vaclav Hudecek - violin
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon
    Concerto in A minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 53
    Gabriela Demeterova - violin
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Supraphon
    Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33
    Rudolf Firkusny - piano
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon
    Czech Suite, Op. 39
    Talich Quartet
    Prague Chamber Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Lotos
    Holoubek / The Wild Dove, Op. 110, Vodnik / The Water-Goblin, Op. 107, Zlaty kolovrat / The Golden Spinning-Wheel, Op. 109
    Janacek Philharmonic Orchestra, Petr Vronsky
    CD Panton
    Humoresque No. 7 in G flat major, Op. 101, Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World [Z Noveho sveta, Novosvetska]", Carnival, Concert Overture, Op. 92, Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major, Op. 72
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek / Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon
    In Natures Realm, Concert Overture, Op. 91, Scherzo Capriccioso, Op. 66
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Sejna
    CD Supraphon
    Legends, Op. 59, Czech Suite in D major, Op. 39
    Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Clarton
    Miniatures, Nocturne in B major, Op. 40
    Josef Suk - violin
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD SKO
    Othello op.93, Symphony no.9 in E minor op.95 "From the New World"
    Berlin Philharmonic, Claudio Abbado
    1 CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Romance for Violin and Orchestra op.11
    Gil Shaham - Violin
    Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Serenade E major, Op. 22, Two Waltzes, Op. 54/1; Op. 54/4
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD SKO
    Serenade for String Orchestra in E major, Op. 22
    Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert Karajan
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Slavonic Dance No. 10 in E minor, Op. 72, No. 2, Festival March, Op. 54, Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major, Op. 72, No. 7, Slavonic Dance No. 9 in B major, Op. 72, No. 1
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Zdenek Macal
    CD MusicVars
    Slavonic Dance no.1 in C major op.46 no.1, Slavonic Dance no.10 in E minor op.72 no.2, Slavonic Dance no.3 in A flat major op.46 no.3, Slavonic Dance no.16 in A flat major op.72 no.8, Slavonic Dance no.7 in C minor op.46 no.7, Scherzo capriccioso op.66
    Berlin Philharmonic, Herbert von Karajan
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Slavonic Dances, Symphony No. 8, In Nature's Realm, Carnival, Othello, Symphony No. 9 "From the New World", The Water Goblin, The Noon Witch, The Golden Spinning Wheel, The Wild Dove,
    Concerto for Cello and Orchestra No. 2, Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, Stabat Mater
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    13 CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 1 in C minor 'The Bells of Zlonice', Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Symphony No. 4 in D minor, Symphony No. 5 in F minor, Symphony No. 6 in D major, Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Symphony No. 8 in G major, Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World"
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    6 CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 1 'The Bells of Zlonice', Symphony No. 2, Op. 4, Symphony No. 3, Op. 10, Symphony No. 4, Op. 13, Symphony No. 5, Op. 76, Symphony No. 8, Op. 88, Symphony No. 6, Op. 60, Symphony No. 7, Op. 70, Symphony No. 9, Op. 95 'From the New World'
    Scottish National Orchestra, Edwin Paling, Neeme Jarvi
    6 CD Chandos
    Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 "From the New World"
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Decca
    Symphony No. 8 in G major "English", Op. 88, Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World", Op. 95
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Radioservis
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World", Op. 45, Carnival, Concert Overture, Op. 92,
    Symphonic Variations, Op. 78
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 "From the New World [Z Noveho sveta, Novosvetska]"
    Te Deum for Soloists, Choir and Orchestra, Op. 103
    Gabriela Benackova, Jaroslav Soucek
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 "From the New World", In Nature's Realm - Concert Overture, Op. 91, Carnival - Concert Overture, Op. 92, My Home - Overture, Op. 62a
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    4 CD Supraphon

    Chamber music
    2 Waltzes, Op. 54
    Skampa Quartet (Pavel Fischer - violin, Jana Lukasova - violin, Radim Sedmidubsky - viola, Jonas Krejci - cello)
    CD Supraphon
    Cello Concerto in A major, Polonaise in A major for Cello and Piano, Rondo in G minor for Cello and Piano, Silent Woods for Cello and Piano, Slavonic Dance in G minor for Cello and Piano,
    Slavonic Dance in A major for Cello and Piano
    Jiri Barta - cello, Jan Cech - piano
    2 CD Supraphon
    Dumky, Op. 90
    Kubelik Trio (Jan Talich jun. - violin, Karel Fiala - cello, Kveta Bilynska - piano)
    CD GZ
    From the Bohemian Forest [Ze Sumavy], Op. 68, Legends, Op. 59
    Igor and Renata Ardasev - piano
    CD Supraphon
    Miniatures, Op. 75a (Second Terzetto for Two Violins and Viola), Bagatelles, Op. 47 for Two Violins, Cello and Harmonium, Terzetto, Op. 74 for Two Violins and Viola
    Josef Suk - violin, Ivan Zenaty - violin, Jan Talich - viola, Jiri Barta - cello, Josef Hala - harmonium
    CD Lotos
    Piano Quintet in A major, Op 81, Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 87
    Josef Suk, Ivan Zenaty - violins, Jan Peruska - viola, Jiri Barta - cello, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Lotos
    Piano Quintet in A, Op. 5, Piano Quintet in A, Op. 81
    Sviatoslav Richter - piano, Borodin Quartet
    CD Philips
    Piano Quintet, Op. 81, String Quintets No. 3 "American", Op. 97
    Talich Quartet (Petr Messiereur, Vladimir Bukac - violins, Jan Talich - viola, Evzen Rattay - cello)
    Kazuko Mimura - piano, Tasso Adamopoulous - viola
    This recording was awarded the special prize by Le Mande de la Musique
    CD Calliope
    Piano Trio in F minor, Op. 65
    Smetana Trio (Jitka Cechova - piano, Hana Kotkova - violin, Jan Palenicek - cello)
    CD Lotos
    Preludes and Fugues for Organ
    Jaroslav Tuma - organ (Rychnov 1843)
    CD Supraphon
    String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 "American"
    Panocha Quartet
    CD Supraphon
    String Quartet in F major "American", Op. 96
    Skampa Quartet
    CD Supraphon
    String Quintet in G major, Op. 77, String Quintet in E flat major, Op. 97
    Josef Suk, Pavel Sporcl - violins, Karel Untermuller, Vladimir Bukac - violas, Tomas Strasil, Jiri Barta - cellos, Tomas Vybiral - double bass
    CD Lotos
    String Sextet in A major, Op. 48
    The Czech Philharmonic Sextet (Bohumil Kotmel, Ota Bartos - violins, Jaroslav Pondelicek, Jan Simon - violas, Frantisek Host, Josef Spacek - cello)
    CD Waldmann

    Operas
    Dimitrij
    Leo Marian Vodicka, Drahomira Drobkova, Magdalena Hajossyova, Livia Aghova, Ivan Kusnjer, Peter Mikulas, Ludek Vele, Zdenek Harvanek, Pavel Haderer
    Prague Radio Chorus, Pavel Kuhn, Czech Philharmonic Chorus, Lubomir Matl
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Gerd Albrecht
    3 CD Supraphon
    Rusalka
    Milada Subrtova, Ivo Zidek, Eduard Haken, Marie Ovcacikova, Alena Mikova
    Prague National Theatre, Chorus and Orchestra, Zdenek Chalabala
    2 CD Supraphon
    Rusalka
    Renee Fleming, Ben Heppner, Dolora Zajick, Franz Hawlata, Eva Urbanova, Ivan Kusnjer, Zdena Kloubova, Dana Buresova, Hana Minutillo
    The Kuhn Mixed Choir, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras
    3 CD Decca

    Vocal
    Biblical Songs, Gypsy Songs, Three Modern Greek Poems
    Ivan Kusnjer - baritone, Marian Lapsansky - piano
    CD Supraphon
    Biblical Songs, Op. 99
    Eduard Haken - bass, Martin Gotthard Schneider - organ improvisations
    CD Rosa
    Love Songs, Op. 83, Four Songs, Op. 2, In Folk Tone, Op. 73
    Magdalena Kozena - mezzosoprano, Graham Johnson - piano
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    In Folk Tone, Op. 73, Gypsy Songs, Op. 55, Love Songs, Op. 83, Biblical Songs, Op. 99
    Dagmar Peckova - mezzo-soprano, Irwin Gage - piano
    CD Supraphon
    Biblical Songs, Op 99, Gypsy Songs, Op. 55, Evening Songs, Op. 3, Love Songs, Op. 83
    Vera Soukupova - contraalto, Beno Blachut - tenor, Jindrich Jirak - baritone
    Ivan Moravec, Alfred Holecek, Ferdinand Pohlreich - pianos
    CD Supraphon
    Biblical Songs, Op. 99, Gypsy Melodies, Op. 55
    Eva Urbanova - soprano, J. Pokorny - piano
    CD GZ
    Moravian Duets [Moravske dvojzpěvy]
    Stanislav Bogunia - piano
    Kuhn Mixed Chorus, Pavel Kuhn
    CD Supraphon
    Requiem, Symphonic Variations
    Pilar Lorengar - soprano, Erszebet Komlossy - contralto, Robert Ilosfalvy - tenor, Tom Krause - bass, The Ambrosian Singers, John McCarthy (Dvorak)
    London Symphony Orchestra, Istvan Kertesz
    2 CD Decca
    Requiem - Funeral Mass for Solo Voices, Chorus and Orchestra, Op. 89
    Maria Stader - soprano, Sieglinde Wagner - contralto, Ernst Haefliger - tenor, Kim Borg - bass
    Prague Philharmonic Choir, Marketa Kuhnova, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    2 CD Supraphon
    Stabat Mater
    Gabriela Benackova, Ortrun Wenkel, Petr Dvorsky, Jan Hendrik Rootering
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Wolfgang Sawallisch
    2 CD Supraphon
    Stabat Mater for Soloists, Choir and Orchestra, Op. 58
    Eva Urbanova, Marta Benackova, John Uhlenhopp, Peter Mikulas
    Prague Philharmonic Choir, Bambini di Praga, Prague Smphony Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    live recording
    CD Supraphon
    Svatební košile / The Spectre's Bride, Op. 69
    Zdena Kloubova - soprano, Jaroslav Brezina - tenor, Gustav Belacek - bass
    Kühn Mixed Choir, Pavel Kühn, Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Radioservis

    Dvořák Museum is situated in the street Ke Karlovu, Prague 2, in the baroque Michna Summer Palace, also called Vila Amerika, and it´s the property of the A. Dvořák Foundation. The museum houses an exhibition of the life and work of the composer. The exhibition introduces Dvořák's personality, his work as both a composer and pedagogue. One section describes his life and another his musical creations. Photos show him with his family, his friends and interpreters of his music, including manuscripts and documents. Dvořáks personal possessions can also be seen, for example his furniture, piano, violin, awards and more.


  • František Xaver DUŠEK

    (* 8.12.1731 Chotěborky u Jaroměře - † 12.2.1799 Praha)

    hudební skladatel, klavírista a pedagog

    Son of a peasant, he was supported by his patron Count Johann Karl Sporck. He studied Jesuit Gymnasium at Hradec Králové, in Prague with F. Habermann and in Vienna with Wagenseil. About 1770 he settled in Prague. He became an important piano teacher, his house (known as Bertramka) was one of music life centre of Prague, and Mozart stayed here in 1787 and completed here his La nozze Di Figaro or Don Giovanni. Dušek was composing in so called Gallant Style. He created about 40 symphonies, concerts for harpsichords or pianos, many chamber musics and sonatas for piano.


  • František BENDA

    (* 22.11.1709 Benátky nad Jizerou - † 7.3.1786 Postupim)

    český skladatel, představitel raného hudebního klasicismu

    F. Benda: Autobiography (1763)

    D. Lee: A Musician at Court and Autobiography of F. Benda (Warren, MI, 1998)


  • Anna FUSEK

    (* 1.1.1981 Praha)

    česká flétnistka, houslistka, klavíristka



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