česká hudba | czech music


personalities

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270 items

anniversaries 2019


  • Marie BUDÍKOVÁ

    (* 3.4.1904 Praha - † 15.7.1984 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    She was a wife of the Czech composer Otakar Jeremiáš (1892–1962), but she was also known under her maiden name. She studied commercial high school and singing only privately. In 1925, she had her debut performance on the non-professional opera stage. In 1929, she was engaged in Pilsen, and form 1933 to 1956, she performed at the National Theatre in Prague. She primarily performed from repertoire of Czech composers, such as Smetana, Dvořák, Foerster, Janáček, and E. F. Burian. She became apparend for her performances in the roles of Mimi in Puccini's La bohéme, Michaela in Bizet's Carmen, Nedda in Leonvacallo´s Commediants, Tatiana in Tchaikovsky's Eugen Onegin. She worked also as a concert singer with the repertoire of Czech contemporary music. She worked as a pedagogue at the Prague Conservatory (1941-1949) and at the Academy of Performing Arts (1957-1973).


  • Maria HAAN

    (* 11.10.1964 Vranov nad Topľou)

    slovenská operní pěvkyně - soprán

    She studied at the Conservatory in Košice and at the University of Performing Arts in Bratislava. From 1991, she was engaged in Olomouc, from 1996 at the State Opera and since 2002 at the Prague National Theatre. She has a versatile soprano. Her repertoire includes Fiordiligi in Mozart's Così fan tutte, Pamina in Mozart's The Magic Flute; Rosina in The Barber of Seville, Fiorilla in The Turk in Italiano, Lucia in Donizetti's Lucia di Lamermoor, Gilda in Verdi´s Rigoletto, Violetta in Puccini's La Traviata, Marguerite in Gounod's Faust and Marguerite, Micaëla in Bizet's Carmen, Mimi in Puccini's La Bohème, Isabella in Meyerbeer's Robert the Devil, Princess in Zemlinsky's Es war einmal, the Vixen in Janáček's The Cunning Little Vixen and other.


  • Josef SUK

    (* 8.8.1929 Praha - † 7.7.2011 Praha)

    český houslista


  • Růžena MATUROVÁ

    (* 2.9.1869 Praha - † 25.2.1938 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Czech soprano

    She studied in the Pivoda School of Vocalists, later with Eduard Stolz and with the married couple of Thomas Löwe and Marie Dreger-Destinn (1889–90). From 1889 to 1990, she was engaged in Teplice (she debuted as Pamina in Mozart´s The Magic Flute), from 1890 to 1893, she performed in Mannheim where she studied 14 great roles. In the summer of 1893, she performed briefly with the Society of Adolf Baumann on the stage in Berlin (as Mařenka in Smetana´s The Bartered Bride with Karel Burian). From 1893 to 1909, she was engaged in the National Theatre in Prague as the first soprano. She had a perfect technical education, full voice and dramatic talent. She was one of the most famous Czech singers of all times. She performed many premieres of Czech operas including Miranda in Fibich´s The Tempest (1895), Hedy in Fibich´s Hedy (1896), Šárka in Fibich´s Šárka (1897), Eva in Foerster´s Eva (1899), Dvořák´s Rusalka (1901), Armida (1904), Vlasta in Ostrčil´s The Death of Vlasta (1904). She emerged fully in the international repertoire such as Donna Anna in Mozart´s Don Giovanni, Leonora in Beethoven´s Fidelio, Desdemona, in Verdi´s Otello, Santuzza in Mascagni´s Cavalleria rusticana, Carmen in Bizet´s Carmen, Elsa and Ortrude in Wagner´s Lohengrin; she was the first Puccini´s Tosca (1903). She performed in the Czech theatres in the cities of Pilsen, Olomouc, and Brno as well as in foreign theatres (1899 in Warszaw, 1903 tour in USA). She devoted herself to the pedagogical activities, following her departure from the National Theatre, she founded the school for vocalists (Marie Krásová was one of her pupils).


  • Jan NOVÁK

    (* 8.4.1921 Nová Říše - † 11.11.1984 Neu-Ulm)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    He studied at the Monastery School in Velehrad where he aquired the knowledge of Latin, later continued his studied at the Conservatory in Brno. He was deported during the Second War. After the war, he continued in studies at the Prague Academy of Performing Arts with Pavel Bořkovec and at the Janáček Academy of Performing Arts in Brno with Vilém Petrželka. In 1947, he received a Scholarship from the Ježek Foundation in USA with Aaron Copland, later continued with Bohuslav Martinů in New York who influenced him significantly. From 1948, he lived and worked in Brno as a composer and pianist. In 1963, he co-founded the Creative Groupe A in Brno, that was focused on the art of composition and theory of contemporary music. After occupation of the Czechoslovakia in 1968, he moved to the Denmark. Between 1970 and 1977, he worked as a teacher and choirmaster in Italian Roverto. From 1977, he taught at the Musikhochschule in Stuttgart. He has counted among the must gifted Czech artists of the period following the 2nd War. He was inspired by Moravian folklore, jazz and New Music (ca 1960) and also by his experience in the theatre. In his compositions, he used Latin, as can be found in 12 Collections of Songs, 9 Collections of Choirs, cantatas Dido (1967), Ignis pro Ioanum Palach (1969) as well as ballets with texts, in the stage music. His later work included six instrumental concerts and almost 25 instrumental and chamber compositions. His work has been released by the editorial house G. Zanibon Padua, Supraphon and Panton.
    www.musica.cz/novakj/


  • Eduard Francevič NÁPRAVNÍK

    (* 24.8.1839 Býšť - † 10.11.1916 Petrohrad)

    český dirigent a skladatel, působící v Rusku

    Czech conductor and composer living in Russia.

    He studied in the School for Organists in Prague with Karel F. Pitsch and František Blažek, instrumentation privately with Johann Friedrich Kittl. He worked primarily as a teacher and publicist. From 1861, he worked in Peterburg as the Kapellmeister of the Jusupovov Orchestra. From 1863, he was engaged in the Tsar´s Opera (Mariinskij teatr) in Peterburg, first as an assistant of Kapellmeister, then as organist and répétiteur, and as second from 1867 and as first Kapellmeister from 1869. He assimilated into the Russian milieu and became an important personality of Russian music life where he contributed to the great artistic level of Russian opera. He studied many premieres of Russian music such as Dargomyžskij, Rimskij-Korsakov, Musorgsky, Rubinstein, a well as several operas of Tschaikovsky: Stone Guest [Kamennyj gosť] (1872), Pskoviťanka (1873), Boris Godunov (1874), The Demon (1875), The Queen of Spides (1890), Iolanta (1892) as well as fundamental operas of the European contemporary repertoire. He premiered two Czech operas in Russia: in 1871 Smetana´s The Bartered Bride, in 1900 Smetana´s Dalibor. He also conducted symphonic concerts among others in the Tsar´s Russian Music Society. He wrote many instrumental compositions and choiral, chamber music, 4 symphonies, collections of dance pieces, orchestral pieces and 4 operas: Nižegorodcy (1869 in Peterburg; in Czech language 1875 in Prague), Garold (1886 in Peterburg; 1888 in Czech language as Harold in Prague), Dubrovskij (1895 in Peterburg; 1896 in Czech language in Prague with many reprises), Francesca da Rimini (1902 in Peterburg).


  • Otakar ZICH

    (* 25.3.1879 Městec Králové - † 9.7.1934 Ouběnice (Bystřice))

    český skladatel a estetik

    Czech composer and aesthetician

    He was a pupil of aesthetician Otakar Hostinský. In the year 1903-06 he taught physics and mathematics at the High School in Domažlice. He composed the operas Malířský nápad (Artis´st Idea), Vina (Guilt, 1915) and Preciózky (1924). He created also many vocal compositions. In 1924 he was appointed professor of Aesthetics at the Charles University. He is an author of many folkloric studies and aesthetic books: Estetika dramatického umění (Aesthetics of Stage Art, 1931), Hodnocení estetické a umělecké (Aesthetical Perception of Music, 1911). He devoted also himself to the theme of Smetana´s work.


  • Jan RYCHLÍK

    (* 27.4.1916 Praha - † 20.1.1964 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    Jan Rychlik was a musician of universal outlook. Well-versed in jazz and folklore, he studied composition in which he put to use classical principles while taking inspiration from New Music. He worked for the film and theatre but also authored a number of chamber and vocal compositions, which reflect his artistic profile. Having displayed his interest in the winds, he subsequently produced such theoretical works as Modern Instrumentation. The most known composition is his African Cycle for eight wind instruments and piano (1961, CD Arta Accords).

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Miloslav KABELÁČ

    (* 1.8.1908 Praha - † 17.9.1979 Praha)

    český skladatel

    In 1926 he entered Prague Technical University but did not finish his studies there. He took private piano lessons from Mikeš and from 1928 studied at the Prague Conservatory - composition with K.B.Jirák, conducting with Dědeček, counterpoint and new composition techniques with Hába and instrumentation with Schulhoff. In 1931-34 he attended V. Kurz's piano masterclass at the Conservatory.

    From 1932 to 1941 Kabeláč worked as a recording director for Prague radio. He became recognized conductor, particularly of the 20th-century music. During the WWII he had to leave the position in radio because of his wife's Jewish origin. He returned there after the war and stayed until 1957. In 1958-62 he taught composition at the Prague Conservatory - his pupils included Ivana Loudová, Jaroslav Krček, Zdeněk Lukáš, Lukáš Matoušek, or Jan Málek.

    As a protest against Czechoslovakia's occupation by Nazi Germany he composed the cantata Neustupujte (Do not Retreat!, 1939) which was his first outstanding work. He used the texts of several folk songs from K. J. Erben's collection from the time of the Prussian invasions of Bohemia in the mid-18th century, and the famous 15th-century Hussite chorale Ktož sú boží bojovníci (Ye Who Are God's Warriors). The cantata is dedicated "To the Czech people" and it is one of the most personal and most effective of Kabeláč's compositions.

    He was very interested in Gregorian chant and non-European musical culture - e.g. in the Cizokrajné motivy for piano (Motifs from Foreign Countries, 1958-59). Many of his works are inspired by folk music - but as with other sources of inspiration he used his own way of interpretation. Among these works are the Milostné písně (Love Songs, 1955), and the Šest ukolébavek (Six Lullabies, 1956).

    Kabeláč used many elements of the New Music, from twelve-tone composition and emphasis on timbre to aleatoric, specific, and electronic music. He was in active contact with contemporary music (ISCM festivals, Warsaw Autumn etc.). He was also very active head of the Committee for electronic music which was found in Czechoslovakia in 1961.

    All his life he had a special liking for percussion instruments. After the cantata "Do Not Retreat!" and the Symphony No. 1 in D for strings and percussions (1941-42), he composed his famous Eight Inventions for Percussion Instruments (six players) for the ensemble Les Percussions de Strasbourg. "Inventions" in the title refers to Bach's formal investigation and polyphonic keyboard writing. This work received its first performance by Les Percussions de Strasbourg on 22 April 1965 as the music for Manuel Parres's ballet, Le Minotaure, and then it has been very successful internationally, performed very often by many percussion-instrument groups as well as ballet ensembles (e.g. New York ballet group of Alvin Ailey). Les Percussions de Strasbourg inspired also the Osm ricercarů pro bicí nástroje (Eight ricercari for Percussion Instruments, 1966-67).

    Notable is also the Symphony No. 8 "Antiphonies" for soprano, mixed choir, percussion instruments and organ (1970). This symphony is written in five movements and four interludes on the words from the Bible and is dedicated to Strasbourg town. The title "Antiphonies" came from the special position of four performers. This work was together with 8 Inventions and two notable Kabeláč's organ compositions Dvě fantazie (Fantasia for organ G minor and D minor, 1957-58) and Čtyři preludia (Four preludes, 1963) heard at a concert entitled "A tribute to Miloslav Kabeláč" in St. Paul church in Strasbourg on 15.6.1971. This concert was organised by two Kabeláč's friends - Pierre Stoll, conductor of the Strasbourg Municipal Orchestra, and Pierre Nardin, a professor at the Conservatory and organist of St. Paul. The composer wasn't allowed to attend this concert by the Czechoslovakian regime.

    After war Kabeláč concentrated mainly on large symphonic works. From his symphonies (each of his 8 s. is written for a different combination of instruments): No. 3 for organ, brasses and timpani (1948-57), No. 4, "Chamber Symphony" (1954-58), No. 5, "Dramatic", for soprano without text, and orchestra (1960), No. 6 "Concertante", for clarinet and orchestra (1961-62), Symphony No. 7 for orchestra and reciter on the composer's text after the Bible (1967-68), written for Baden Baden orchestra. Other important orchestral works are the symphonic passacaglia Eufemias Mysterion (The Mystery of Silence, 1965) for soprano and chamber orchestra, to composer's own words in Classical Greek, Hamletovská improvizace (Hamlet Improvisation, 1962-63), reflecting the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's birth, and Zrcadlení (Reflections, 1963-64), nine miniatures using various composition techniques.

    His last, monumental works are inspired by Czech history. The six-movement electronic composition E fontibus Bohemicis - Six tableaux from Czech annals (1965-72), with the sound of the bell Zikmund (the biggest bell of Prague), and the Proměny I, II (Metamorphoses), the first version for female speaker, barytone, male chorus and mixed chorus finished in 1978, and the second version for piano and orchestra finished in 1979. The Metamorphoses are both based on the oldest Czech chorale Hospodine, pomiluj ny (Lord, have mercy on us).

    Kabeláč composed also many chamber works - Passacaglia TGM (1937) or 8 preludes for piano (1955-56), Sonatina for oboe and piano (1955), Ballad for violin and piano (1956) or Suite for saxophone and piano (1959), choruses - 6 male choruses, 1939-40) on words by Jiří Wolker, Modré nebe (Blue Sky, 1950), children's chorus on the poetry by František Hrubín, or Přírodě (To Nature, 1957-58), children's chorus on the words of folk poetry, and also some incidental music.

    Composer and conductor Jaroslav Krček, a pupil of Kabeláč, wrote this about his teacher's music: "It is music arriving from a space pervaded by goodness and love. Such music is much needed. It inspires a search for truth because it is truthful itself. It is enchanting, because it is pure. It stimulates the taking of stands, because it takes a stand itself. This is exactly what its composer was like."


    Links: www.musica.cz
    www.klassika.info/Komponisten/Kabelac/
    www.musicabona.com


    Biblography
    P. Nardin and M. David: Miloslav Kabeláč ou le salaire de l'honneur


    Discography

    Love Song [Milostna]
    Prague Radio Choir, Milan Maly
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Josef Hrncir

    CD Radioservis

    Love Songs [Milostne pisne], Op. 25
    Kristyna Valouskova - soprano, Edita Adlerova - alto, Petr Matuzsek - baritone, Petr Jirikovsky - piano
    Petr Bernasek - violin, Barbora Vachalova - harp, Kamil Dolezal - clarinet, artistic leader, Jiri Richter - viola, Jiri Hudec - double bass, Hanus Barton - piano, Miroslav Kejmar - percussion

    CD Oliverius

    Mystery of Time - Passacaglia for Large Orchestra, Op. 31 (1953-1957)
    Hamlet Improvisation for Large Orchestra, Op. 46 (1962-1963)

    Jiri Reinberger - organ, Bedrich Dobrodinsky - harp, Robert Mach - timpani
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    Golden Harmony Award 2002

    CD Supraphon

    Seven Compositions for Piano, Op. 14 (1946)
    Passacaglia T. G. M., Op. 3 (1937)
    Motifs from Exotic Lands, Op. 38 (1959)
    Eight Preludes,Op. 30 (1956)

    Daniel Wiesner - piano
    CD Panton

    Sonata for Cello and Piano, Op. 9
    Daniel Veis - cello, Helena Veisova - piano
    CD Panton

    Symphony No. 4 in A major, Op. 36 "Camerata"
    Euphemias Mysterion for Soprano and Chamber Orchestra, Op. 50
    Do not Retreat! Cantata for Male Chorus, Wind and Percussion Instruments, Op. 7
    6 Cradle-songs for Contralto, Female Chorus and Instrumental Ensemble, Op. 29, Reflections, 9 Miniatures for Orchestra, Op. 49

    CD Supraphon

    Two Fantasias, Op. 32
    Four Preludes, Op. 48

    Jan Hora, Petr Cech - organ
    CD Vixen


  • Ladislav VYCPÁLEK

    (* 23.2.1882 Praha - † 9.1.1969 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer, violinist and violist

    He studied Czech and German at Charles University and composition privately with Vítězslav Novák. From 1907 he was working in University Library (today National Library) where he founded the Deparment of Music in 1922 and became its first director. He directed it up to his retirement in 1942. His musical output is not large and comprises mainly vocal compositions. He played the violin and the viola in a quartet but didn´t write much instrumental music. Vycpálek´s songs and choruses are composed on the texts from Czech and German symbolist poetry, he drew inspiration from Moravian folk music. Prior to the First World War, there are e.g. Tichá usmíření (Quiet Reconciliation, 1908-9), Dívka z Lochroyanu (The Maid of Lochroyan, 1907, rev.1911), Světla v temnotách (Lights in the Darkness, 1910), Tři smíšené sbory (Three Choruses for Mixed Voices, 1911-12) or Z Moravy (From Moravia, 1910-14). During WWI Vycpálek wrote two series of arrangements of Moravian folk songs: the Moravské balady (Moravian Ballads, 1915) and Vojna (War, 1915). While working on those cycles, he had been specially attracted by the texts of two songs, which served him as poetic material for the Kantáta o posledních věcech člověka (Cantata of the Last Things of Man, 1920-22), his major vocal-symphonic work. His musical thought is primarily contrapuntal, he was attached to the tradition of Baroque music. It is obvious in his sonata Chvála houslí (Praise to the Violin, 1927-8) for violin, mezzosoprano and piano, the Duo for Violin and Viola (1929), the Suites for Solo Violin (1930) and Solo Viola (1929) and two vocal-symphonic works - the cantata Blahoslavený člověk ten (Blessed Is This Man, 1933) and the České requiem (Czech Requiem, 1940), both written on biblical texts.

    Biblography
    Smolka, Jaroslav: Ladislav Vycpálek: tvůrčí vývoj (creative evolution), Prague, 1960 (incl. list of works to 1959, list of writings and extensive bibliography)

    Discography

    Czech Requiem
    Cantata of the Last Things of Man

    Tikalová, Řeháková, Mrázová, Šrubař, Mráz
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Karel Ančerl

    2 CD Supraphon


  • Jan ZACH

    (* 13.11.1699 Čelákovice - † 24.5.1773 Ellwangen)

    český skladatel a varhaník

    Czech composer

    The entire course of his life is not well known. From 1724, he lived in Prague, where he was a pupil of Bohuslava M. Černohorský. After 1725, he worked as an organist and violinist in choirs of many Prague churches, such as St. Jacob-St. Gallus, St. Martin, St. Simon and Juda. In 1737, he didn´t receive the position of choirmaster in the Metropolitan St. Vitus Cathedral, and thus moved to Germany. Between 1745 to 1750, he worked as a Kapellmeister of the Kurfürst Johann Friedrich Karl von Ostein in Mainz. Due to personal conflicts, he was suspended in 1750, and later in 1756 fired. He didn´t received more stabile employment and worked as a teacher and musician in many places and cloisters troughout Germany. He belongs to the Pre-Classicstical composers. In his work, we can discern rudiments of classical forms, abundant chromatic and inspiration in German and Czech folklore. He wrote approximately 40 masses, 4 requiems, offertories, spiritual arias, hymns, motets and 36 symphonic works – concerts, symphonies, many chamber music’s and compositions for solo instruments. His compositions were often copied. Some of these were printed prior to 1800.


  • Alena MÍKOVÁ

    (* 21.11.1928 Praha - † 26.4.2014 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Czech soprano

    She studied singing privately and debuted as the Foreign Ducheness in Dvořák´s Rusalka at the Prague Singspiel (Pražská zpěvohra) in 1952. From 1954, she was engaged in Ústí nad Labem, and later from 1957 to 1988 in the Prague National Theatre. Her expressive soprano voice exuded its rich dark hues primarily in the dramatic roles of contemporary operas. She guested at the State opera in Berlin, the State opera in Vienna, as well as in opera houses in Marseille, Dublin and other cities. Her repertoire includes Miladana in Smetana´s Dalibor, Libusse, Jenůfa and Kostelnička in Janáček´s Jenůfa, Emilia Marty in The Macropulos Case; Tosca in Puccini´s Tosca, Senta in Wagner´s The Flying Dutchman, Brünnhilda in Walkyre; Strauss´s Salome and Elektra; Šárka in/Fibich´s Šárka, Maryša in Burian´s Marysa, Leonora in Beethoven´s Fidelio, Marie in Berg´s Woyzzek, Catherine in Shostakowitz´s Katerina Izmailova, Woman in monodrama Woman Voice by Francis Poulenc as well as role in the Schönberg´s Expectation (Brno, 1969).


  • Karel BURIAN (Carl BURIAN)

    (* 12.1.1870 Rousínov u Rakovníka - † 25.9.1924 Senomaty)

    český operní pěvec - heroický tenor

    Brother of Emil Burian. He studied law in Prague, singing in Prague and in Münich with Moritz Wallerstein and Moritz Anger. In 1891, he had his debut in Brno with the tenor roles (Jeník in Smetana´s Bartered Bride or Dalibor in Dalibor). Following this, he was engaged in Reval (Tallin), Aachen, Kolin am Rhein, Hannover and Hamburg (1898-1900), and was also a guest singer in operas in Berlin, Bremen and Dresden. From 1900 to 1901, he performed the National Theatre in Prague, and was later a guest singer in Prague in operatic roles of Smetana and Wagner. He reached the height of his career at Dresden opera between 1902 and 1910, when he performed in the role of Herodes in Strauss´s Salome and Tristan in Wagner´s Tristan and Isolde. He was also a guest singer in Münich, Berlin, Leipzig, Zürich, Stuttgart, Covent Garden, Brussel, Vienna and Paris (in 1907, he performed with Emma Destinn in the Parisian premiere of Salome). He later performed roles of the operas of Wagner in Bayreuth and Metropolitan Opera i New York. From 1912 to 1913, he was engaged in Vienna. He had a strong tenor voice and was a famous actor. He primarily became famous for his performances of the Wagnerian roles. With his brother Emil, he also managed song-concerts. He devoted himself also to literary activities (poems, feuilletons), and also translated Czech songs into German language as well as German librettos into Czech (i.e. Tristan and Isolde, Salome). He wrote his biography My Memories (1913).


  • Rudolf FIRKUŠNÝ

    (* 11.2.1912 Napajedla - † 19.7.1994 Staatsburg, NY)

    český klavírista

    From 1919 he toke piano lessons with L. Janáček, after he studied at Brno Conservatory with Růžena Kurzová and Prague Conservatory with Vilém Kurz and composer Rudolf Karel. Privately, he continued with Josef Suk (1929-30). Firkušný's compositions included especially compositions for piano (Piano Concerto, 1930). His debut in Prague was in 1922, in England in 1933, in USA in 1930, in South America in 1943, in Australia in 1959.

    His repertoire includes especially the work of Martinů, Janáček, Kaprálová or Dvořák. He recorded complete piano music of Janáček.


  • Helena KAUPOVÁ

    (* 11.8.1964 Hořovice)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    She studied at the Conservatory in Brno, at the Academy of Performing Arts in Bratislava with J. Špaček, and has also graduated from courses in Siena, Weimar and Gent.

    Since 1989, she guested at the Slovakian National Theatre in Bratislava as Pamina in Mozart's The Magic Flute and Micaëla in Bizet's Carmen. From 1992 to 1998, she was engaged at the National Theatre in Prague, she is currently a guest focalist here, performing the roles of Mimi in Puccini's La bohème, Mozart's Donna Anna in Don Giovanni, Vendulka in Smetana's The Kiss, Mařenka in The Bartered Bride, Krasava in Libusse, Tatiana in Tchaikovsky's Eugen Onegin, Dvořák's Rusalka and Janáček's Jenůfa and others.

    In 1994 and 1996, she performed in Toronto, in Vancouver (1996), in Edinburgh as Janáček's Šárka (1993), in Santiago de Chile in the role of Janáček's Jenůfa (1998), in Amsterdam as Kristina in Janáček The Macropulos Case, in Israel as Janáček's Katya Kabanova (2001).


  • Luboš FIŠER

    (* 30.9.1935 Praha - † 23.6.1999 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    He studied at the Prague Conservatory and at the Academy of Performing Arts with Emil Hlobil. After his Romantic style episode, he began to experiment, making use of great invention. He worked as a freelance composer, and debuted with the opera Lancelot based on the Flemish legend (1961). His famous compositions appeared at the end of 1960´s most notably Fifteen Sheets about Dürer´s Apocalypse (1965), the cycle Caprichos (1966) based on the work of Francisco Goya, The Lament above the Devastation of the City of Ur (1970, revised in 1978). He wrote approximately 9 orchestral works, 9 concerts (also for the guitar and organ), chamber and solo compositions, 2 melodramas and almost 250 musical score for TV and 75 film scores. Some of them were awarded icluding. Golet in the Valley (1995), King Ubu (1996).


  • Josefina DUŠKOVÁ

    (* 6.3.1754 Praha - † 8.1.1824 Praha)

    česká pěvkyně - soprán

    Also known as Josepha Duschek, born Hambacher.

    She studied singing, piano and composition with František Xaver Dušek (1731-1799) and married him in 1776. In 1777, the married couple met with Mozart in Salzburg. Mozart was later their guest in Bertram where they lived in Prague. Mozart composed the aria Bella mia fiamma, addio for Josefina in 1787 during his visit of Bertramka.

    Although Josefina Dušková was a concert and choir singer, she played an important role in the promotion of the operas by Mozart and Naumann. She emerged with her coloratura art and with her famous dramatic interpretation.


  • Milan SLAVICKÝ

    (* 7.5.1947 Praha - † 18.8.2009 Praha)

    český skladatel


  • Zdeněk CHALABALA

    (* 18.4.1899 Uherské Hradiště - † 4.3.1962 Praha)

    český dirigent

    Czech conductor

    He began to study law inVienna and philosophy at the University in Prague. He later devoted himself to music. He attended courses of František Neumann and Leoš Janáček at the Brno Conservatory (1925–26). He received vital experiences in opera and found his own Romantic and expresive style of conducting. From 1925 to 1936, he worked as a second conductor, and later as conductor in Brno. Here, he created a tradition of Czech and Russian repertoire. During the period between 1936 and 1945, he worked as a music advisor in the National Theatre in Prague, but however, rarely conducted. From 1945 to 1947, he worked as a Chief of Opera in Ostrava and after a short period in Prague, he returned again to Ostrava. From 1949 to 1951, he worked as the Chief of Opera in Brno, from 1951 to 1953, the Chief of Opera at the Slovakian National Theatre in Bratislava. From 1956 to 1959, he worked in the Grand Theatre in Moskow and guested in Leningrad. Here, he studied many Czech works, such as Janáček´s Jenůfa in 1958 and Dvořák´s Rusalka in 1959. He was also an excellent conductor of concerts. He represented one of must important personalitis of his generation in the enre of opera.


  • Roman JANÁL

    (* 14.7.1964 Trenčín)

    slovenský operní pěvec - baryton

    He studied violin at the Conservatory in Pilsen until 1985, singing at the Music Academy in Sofia, and privately with Vilém Zítek. In 1989, he debuted as Tarquinius in Britten's opera The Rape of Lucretia in Sofia. In 1991, he became a member of the Opera in Banská Bystrica, in 1992, he performed in the Opera Mozart ensemble in Prague. In 1995, he sang at the State Opera in Prague, and since 1997, he has been performing at the National Theatre in Prague. Since 1994, he has also cooperated with Pilsen Opera. He performs in foreign countries; he is an excellent performer of cantata's pieces. In 1995, he was awarded first prize in the Competition of Antonín Dvořák in Karlovy Vary. He also works as a pedagogue of the Prague Conservatory. He has recorded many compositions.

    His repertoire includes Pollux in Rameau's Castor et Pollux, Mozart's Guglielmo in Così fan tutte, Papageno in The Magic Flute, Don Giovanni in Don Giovanni and Almaviva in Figaro's Marriage, Figaro in Rossini's The Barber from Sevilla, Belcore in Donizetti's L'elisir d'amore, Germont in Verdi´s La Traviata, Valentin in Gounod´s Faust, Escamillo in Bizet´s Carmen, Eugen Onegin in Tchaikovsky´s Eugen Onegin, Tomskij in Queen of Spades.


  • Otakar MAŘÁK

    (* 5.1.1872 Ostřihom - † 2.7.1939 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - tenor

    Czech tenor

    He studied at the Art Academy, singing with Olga Paršová-Zikešová, and later in Paris in 1907. In 1899, he debuted in Brno with Faust in Gounod´s Faust. From 1899 to 1901 and from 1903 to 1907, he was engaged at the National Theatre in Prague. From 1909 to 1934, as a permanent guest. He spent the major of his career abroad and in 1918 he became an American citizen. He guested in must of the important cultural centres in Europe, in particular in Frankfurt (1901/02), In 1903, he was invited by Gustav Mahler to sing in the Curt Opera in Vienna. From 1906 to 1912, he performed at the Berlin Komische Oper an der Weidendammer Brücke, from 1910 to 1912, at the Municipal Theatre of Vinohrady, in 1911 in Berlin Kurfürstenoper, in 1913 in London (i.e. in Strauss´s Ariadne on Naxos, in English premiere). He created many Wagnerian roles in the USA including in particular Parsifal in Chicago (1914). In the National Theatre in Prague, he cooperated with chief conductor Karel Kovařovic and Otakar Ostrčil. He studied approximately 75 roles from the Czech and world repertoires including Jeník in Smetana´s The Bartered Bride, Lukáš in The Kiss, Dalibor in Dalibor, Šťáhlav in Libusse; Tamino in Mozart´s The Magic Flute, Don Ottavio in Don Giovanni; Radames in Verdi´s Aida, Alfréd in La Traviata, Manrico in Troubadour; Wagnerian roles Tannhäuser and Lohengrin; Dimitrij in Dvořák´s Dimitrij, Florestan in Beethoven´s Fidelio, Hoffmann in Offenbach´s Hoffmann´s Stories, Werther in Massenet´s Werther, Don José in Bizet´s Carmen, Cavaradossi in Puccini´s Tosca. From 1934 he lived as a teacher in Chicagom and in 1937, with the help of his compatriots, he returned to Prague as an ill man.


  • Ondřej ADÁMEK

    (* 9.3.1979 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Ondřej Adámek belongs to the most prominent representatives of the youngest generation of Czech composers. He is the author of symphonic, chamber, vocal and electroacoustic music. He collaborates with choreographers of contemporary dance. In his musical language he combines elements of contemporary classical music with transformed musical elements of distant cultures.  The simplicity of musical expression corresponds in his works with a thouroughly elaborate colours of sounds. In recent years Adamek has  been also using the electroacoustic representation of pulse and breath in his compositions.

    Work List

    1. Instrumental music
      • Falling Dreams (2006) for symphonic orchestra
      • Gamelang‘s Glare (2006) for symphonic orchestra
      • Silent Touches (2005) for baritone  and 5  instruments to text by composer (trombone, violin, violoncello, piano, percussion)
      • Éclats de Gamelan (2005) for symphonic orchestra; first performance: 19th June 2005, Centre Acanthes, Metz, Orchestre National de Lorraine, cond. by Jacques Mercier
      • Rapid Eyes Movements (2005) for string quartet and electronics; first performance: 8th April 2005 at IRCAM in Paris (also version for string quartet without electronics)
      • Sinuous Words (2005) for 20 musicians, first performance: 19th November 2004 in Montréal, Nouvel Ensemble Moderne (also version for 15 musicians or chamber orchestra)
      • Strange Night in Daylight (2004) for 20 musicians and electronics, first performance: 21st January  2004,  CNSMDP in Paris (also version for 12 musicians and electronics or  for chamber orchestra and electronics)
      • Danse Méchanique (2003) for 6 musicians (clarinet, French horn, 2 percussionists, double bass, prepared piano); first performance: 4th October 2003, Czech Centre in Paris
      • Gouttes, petites Gouttes (2003) for 18 instruments; first performance: February 2003,  CNSMDP in Paris
      • Ombres qui passent…. (2001) for six voices to text by composer
      • Inflexion  (2001) for two saxophones; first performance: June 2004, Festival ICE, Chicago
      • Les Touches (2001) for 9 musicians (flute, clarinet, 2 percussion players, harpsichord or prepared piano, violin, viola, violoncello, contrabas)
      • Tremblement……Return (2000) for soprano, clarinet, bass clarinet, viola and piano. Texts: Peter van de Kamp a Daniel Soukup
      • The Rite of Dance (1999) for 4 percussionists
      • Lonely Sadness (1998) for two clarinets, CR (score: publ. by the Czech Radio Prague)
    2. Electroacoustic compositions:
      • Cercle des Rythmes Vitaux (2003) - first performance: 15th January  2004, Bruxelles
      • Passing by….. (2003)
      • Debris from Kibera (2003)
      • Un Souffle, une Ombre, un Rien (2001) - first performance:  March 2001,  CNSMDP in Paris
    3. Music for stage
      • 2002 - project UNESCO, creation of the performance 'Abila' - contemporary dance and electroacoustic music, preparation and premiered in Nairobi - Kenya, choreographer: Opiyo Okach
      • 1999 - music to the dumb show "Tunel - Sprcha" [Tunnel - Shower], theatre "Alfréd ve dvoře"
      • 1997 - music to the dumb show "Pohyblivy kabinet - Pygmejuv sen" [Moving Cabinet - The Dream of a Pygmy], theatre "Alfréd ve dvoře"
      • 1996 - music

  • Michaela FUKAČOVÁ

    (* 27.3.1959 Brno)

    česká violoncellistka žijící v zahraničí


    Czech Violoncellist living abroad

    She plays violoncello since fourteen. She absolved Conservatory in Brno, Academy of Arts in Prague (with prof. S. Večtomov). She studied at the Royal Conservatory in Copenhagen (with prof. E. Blondal-Bentsson), private with W. Pleethe in London. She continued with master classes in Sienna, Los Angeles. She estimated much more the prices of International Competition of P. I. Tchajkovsky in Moskow, Competition of Prague Spring, and Competition of W. Naumburg in New York. Since 1985 she is living in Denmark where she was awarded price of Danish critics and Honorary Membership in Denmark Academy. She is performing regularly in Europe, in USA, Canada, Japan, and South Korea. She cooperates with many important orchestras. She recorded complete work for violoncello and piano by Martinů with I. Klánský. In 1996, she absolved a tour with Czech Philharmonic in Japan. Here discography includes works by Dvořák, Janáček and Martinů. Selection of CDs: L. Janáček: Complete Works for violin, Cello and Piano (with J. Suk and B. Jedličková, Carlton 3036600327), Compositions for Violoncello and Orchestra, Brno State Philharmonic, conductor L. Pešek (Supraphon 110360-2), A. Dvořák: Violoncello Concert B Minor, Panton 810706-2, B. Martinů: Cello Concertos (Kontrapunkt 32256), B. Martinů: Complete Works for Cello and Piano (Kontrapunkt 32084/86) ad.

    Links:
    fukacova.com
    Michaela Fukacova


  • Richard HAAN

    (* 18.3.1949 Košice)

    slovenský operní pěvec - baryton

    Slovakian Baryton

    He studied privately in Prague with René Tuček, J. Švábová, and I. Josifov in Sofia. From 1974 he was engaged in the Opera in Ústí nad Labem (he debuted as Escamillo in Bizet´s Carmen). From 1982, he worked in Olomouc, from 1985 in Brno, from 1990 to 1993 in Bratislava, and then kater returned to Brno. He is currently teaching at the Janáček Academy of Arts. He in a often a guest performer at the State Opera and the National Theatre in Prague as well as on foreing stages in France, Spain, Italy, Austria, Germany, Israel and USA.

    He has a sonorous baritone voice and an impressive appearance. He has performed in Verdi's roles in particular Rigoletto, Nabucco, Rodrigo di Posa in Don Carlos, Renato in Un ballo di maschera, Scarpia in Puccini's Tosca, Telramund in Wagner's Lohengrin, Jochanaan in Strauss's Salome, Escamillo in Bizet's Carmen, Mozart's Don Giovanni, Macbeth and Jago in Verdi´s Otello, Mefistofeles in Gounod's Faust, Eugen Onegin in Tchaikovsky's Eugen Onegin), the Dutchman in Wagner's The Flying Dutchman, Porgy in Gershwin's Porgy and Bess), Forester in Janáček's The Cunning Little Vixen and others.


  • Milan MALÝ

    (* 14.5.1930 Praha - † 28.11.2004 Praha)

    český sbormistr

    Czech choirmaster

    He studied at the Pedagogical Faculty at the Charles University in Prague and conducting at the Academy of Performing Arts where he was a pupil of Metod Doležil, Václav Smetáček and Alois Klíma. From 1953 to 1955, he was an assistant of the choirmaster Jan Kühn in the Czech Choir. From 1956 to the end of his life, he worked as a choirmaster and guest choirmaster in the National Theatre, from 1963 to 1985, he was also an artistic chief of Czechoslovak Radio Choir. From 1968 to 1999, he cooperated regularly with the Bayreuther Festspiele as an assistant of chief choirmaster. At the National Theatre, he prepared more that 200 opera premieres and choral performances. He studied music from all periods with special emphasis on Czech music.


  • Libuše DOMANÍNSKÁ

    (* 4.7.1924 Brno)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Born Klobásková. In 1940, she began her studies at the Brno Conservatory, and in 1944 was deported to Germany. She completed her studies in 1946.

    She worked in the Brno opera until 1954 (she debuted as Blaženka in Smetana's The Secret), and from 1955 to 1990, she performed at the National Theatre in Prague.

    She primarily performed roles in the operas of Smetana (Mařenka in The Bartered Bride, Krasava in Libusse), Dvořák's Rusalka as well as the works of Janáček. She was focused on Janáček works, but she mastered also an Italian repertoire: Fiordiligi in Mozart's Così fan tutte, Desdemona in Verdi's Otello, Aida in Verdi's Aida, Elisabeth from Valois in Verdi's Don Carlos, Mimi in Puccini's La Bohème and others.

    Between 1957 to 1968, she was a vocalist in the Vienna Volksoper, and was especially known for her role as Abigail in Verdi's Nabucco. She created many opera characters of 20th century (Strauss, Martinů, Prokofiev and others). She was guest singer in Moscow, Bruxelles, Amsterdam, Edinburgh, Barcelona, Buenos Aires, Berlin and Italian stages. She devoted herself systematically to the concert activities.


  • Viktor ULLMANN

    (* 1.1.1898 Těšín - † 18.10.1944 Osvětim)

    německý skladatel, narozený a žijící v Čechách

    German composer born and living in Czech lands

    He studied High School in Vienna, later was in the voluntary service during the 1st World War. Between 1918 and 1919, he attended the composition seminar of Arnold Schönberg in Vienna. From 1920 to 1927, he worked as a conductor of the German Theatre in Prague (under the chief of opera Alexander Zemlinsky). From 1928 to 1929, he headed the opera in Ústí n. Labem, From 1929 to 1931, he was the conductor of the Theatre in Geneve, and he worked at antroposophical liberary in Stuttgart until 1933. From 1933 to 1939, he lived in Prague and worked as a teacher and composer. He remained in contact with Alois Hába and the circle of the International Society for Contemporary Music. He worked for the German broadcasting division in the Czech Radio and for the International Society for Music Education. He wrote many reviews. After 1939, he lost the opportunity to have his work performed in public. In 1942, he edited his works to print them himself. On September 9th 1942, he was deported to the Theresienstadt Ghetto where he was significantly active in the organization of the camp´s culture life. On October 16th 1944, he was deported to Osvetim. He wrote orchestral Variationen über Schönberg (which received the Universal Edition prize in 1934), Neo-Classicist Symphonische Phantasie, concerts for piano and saxophone, piano sonatas and some collections of songs with expressive Post-Romantic melodic. He completed three operas: Der Sturz des Antichrist (1935, performed in 1995), one-act opera Der zerbrochene Krug (1942, performed in 1996) and Kaiser von Atlantis Der Kaiser von Atlantis oder Die Tod-Verweigerung (1943, performed in 1975 Amsterdam).


  • Prague Symphony Orchestra

    (* 1.9.1934 Praha)


  • Karel VELEBNÝ

    (* 17.3.1931 Praha - † 7.3.1989 Praha)

    český jazzový skladatel a multiinstrumentalista

    Jazz player, multiinstrumentalist, composer, arranger, actor and publicist

    He absolved the Conservatory. After he became a member of Karel Krautgarner´s Orchestra (1955-58). He influenced the evolution of modern jazz in Czechoslovakia especially in the ensemble SHQ. He played tenorsaxophone, vibraphone or piano. Due to his heart malady he stoped play wind instruments and continued play vibraphon or piano. He was awarded as a vibraharpist. He has played in many formations: i.e. with E. Olmerová. He composed more that 200 compositions, he was an author of the music to the films: Dobří lidé nevymřeli (Good People didn´t Die out yet), Dvojitý Nelson (Double Nelson), Jednorukého píseň (Song of One-Handed Man), Oživení (Pick up) and others. He found his inspiration especially in modern post-bop mainstream. He also worked with folk music (disc Týnom tánom). He was a cofounder of the theatre of Jára Cimrman (1967).


  • Dalibor VAČKÁŘ

    (* 19.9.1906 Korčula - † 21.10.1984 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer and writer, son of Vácalv Vačkář

    He studied violin with Reissig and Hoffmann, comsition with Šín and Suk. He played the violin in the Prague radio orchestra in 1934-35, worked as a film dramatist (1945-47).


  • Jiří ŠLITR

    (* 15.2.1924 Zálesní Lhota - † 26.12.1969 Praha)

    český skladatel, klavírista a výtvarník, člen autorské dvojice s J. Suchým

    Czech composer, pianist and artist

    He studied law at the Charles University in Prague. He started with music in Rychnov in student ensemble Czechoslovak Dixiland Jazz Band. In the years 1958-61 he worked as a pianist in Laterna Magica. From 1958 he began to perform with J. Suchý in Reduta. In 1959 they founded the theatre Semafor. Together they wrote many plays: Člověk z půdy (Man from the Loft, 1959), Zuzana je sama doma (Zuzana is Home Alone, 1960), Taková ztráta krve (Such Loss of Blood, 1960), Šest žen Jindřicha VIII. (Six Women of Henry VIII., 1962) and others. In the year 1962 they performed for first time as actors in the cabaret play Jonáš and Tingl-Tangl. The songs composed by pair Šlitr (music)-Suchý (text) became very popular.


  • Jarmila NOVOTNÁ

    (* 23.9.1907 Praha - † 9.2.1994 New York City, NY)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán


    Czech Soprano

    She performed small roles at the stage of the National Theatre from her 15 years. She studied by Ema Destinn and Hilbert Vávra, in her 18 years she shined in the role of Mařenka in the National Theatre. From 1927 she studied in Italy and debuted there in the role of Gilda, she received the engagement in Berlin. In 1931 she married the noble Jiří Daubek and lived in Liteň near Beroun. After the line up of Fascism in Germany she worked in Vienna and Prague. In Mars 1939 she emigrated in USA and worked in New York as a soloist in Metropolitan Opera (to the year 1956). She inspired the translation of the opera The Bartered Bride in English. Her castle in Líšeň was confiscated in 1948. She received many awards. She shined especially in the roles of Mařenka, Violetta, Mimi or Gilda, and due to her charm she was many more engaged in the film (Devotees to Sun, Fire in the Opera, The Bartered Bride, Frasquita, Last Waltz, Famous Caruso and others).


  • Karel NEDBAL

    (* 28.10.1888 Dvůr Králové nad Labem - † 20.3.1964 Praha)

    český dirigent


    Czech conductor and composer

    The nephew of the composer and conductor Oskar Nedbal was a pupil of Vítězslav Novák and Josef Bohuslav Foerster. He worked as a conductor at the Vinohrady Theatre from 1914 to 1920. In 1920 he became chief conductor at Olomouc Opera Theatre. In 1928 he replaced his uncle Oskar in Slovak National Theatre in Bratislava. In 1938-40 he conducted in Brno, in 1941-45 he returned to Olomouc, from 1945 to 1947 he worked as a conductor at the Prague National Theatre.


  • František Ignác TŮMA

    (* 2.10.1704 Kostelec nad Orlicí - † 30.1.1774 Vídeň)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer

    Son of organist at Kostelec, he studied in Jesuit seminary in Prague, he was for a time vocalist at the Minorite church St. James in Prague. Then he went to Vienna and settled there probably befor 1729. By 1731 was appointed Kapellmeister to Count Franz Ferdinand Kinsky. He studied composition with a court composer J. J. Fux. Soon he became a known mostly for his church compositions. Tůma remained in Kinsky´s service until his death in 1741. After, he became Kapellmeister by the widow of Emperor Charles VI, among her death he received a pension. He worked as a composer and violinist or theorba player in Vienna. His works of this time ware commissioned by the Empress Maria Theresia. Tůma composed in the style of late Baroque. His 14 Masses are in a cappella style. His compositions were known for their expression and chromaticism. Some of his works (sinfonias, partitas, sonatas) can be assigned to the Galant style.


  • Matouš KOPÁČEK

    (* 1.1.1989 Roudnice nad Labem)

    český klarinetista


  • Jan KLUSÁK

    (* 18.4.1934 Praha)

    český skladatel a herec

    Jan Klusák spent his youth during the Neo-classical period (1st Symphony). From the sixties, he applied dodecaphonic knowledge and serial techniques as, step by step, he discovered them from his studies of the compositions of the second Vienna school. The actual substance of his steps did not, however, inhibit the growth of his particular fantasies. Around this time, he became aware of current trends and was especially influenced by G. Mahler's expressionist approach as a basis for the next possible modification (Variace na Mahlerovo tema (Variations on Mahler's theme)). The premier performance in 1960 was the first manifestation of the New Music in Prague. The symphonic form of Klusák's works is a creative invention of one-sentence compositions with one theme, for different instrument combinations. The lyrics he uses in his choral compositions are derived from everything from folk poems to contemporary poets. One of last composition is opera Message for Academy on the subject of Franz Kafka (1993-97) and symphony poem Earth Eden is at the sight (1998).

    Links:
    www.musica.cz


  • Erwin SCHULHOFF

    (* 8.6.1894 Praha - † 18.8.1942 Wülzburg)

    český skladatel a klavírista německého původu

    Czech composer and pianist of German origin

    He came from a German-speaking Jewish family. Although his parents were not musical themselves, they fully supported his talent. By a recommendation of Antonín Dvořák he commenced his musical studies at the Prague Conservatory (1904-6) - recognized as a child prodigy Schulhoff was already accepted at the age of 10 to study piano. He continued his studies with Willi Thern at Horák´s Musikinstitut in Vienna (1906-8). From 1908 to 1910 he studied in Leipzig (composition with Max Reger, piano with Robert Teichmüller and theory with Stephan Krehl). In 1910 he made his first one-year concert tour in Germany. He completed his successful studies in Cologne (1911-14) under Fritz Steinbach, Lazzaro Uzielli, Carl Friedberg, Franz Bölsche and Ewald Strasser. In Cologne he also took some lessons from Debussy. He won the Wüllner Prize at the conservatory in 1913. He also won the Mendelssohn Prize twice - in 1913 as a pianist and in 1918 as a composer for his Piano sonata. Compositions of his first creative period are mostly written in the late Romantic expressive style (Joyful Overture,1913). As an excellent pianist he performed the classical repertoire and also the avant-garde music of his time - works of Scryabin, Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, Hindemith, Bartok and also the quarter-tone piano music of Alois Haba and his pupils. He was considered as a specialist for jazz. The promising start of his career was interrupted by the outbreak of the First World War. He spent a full four years as a soldier in the Austrian army on the eastern front. After the war Schulhoff lived in Germany from 1919 to 1923. The war experience marked his vision of the world and the art. He began his way in Dresden. He was attracted by the German left-wing avant-garde. He founded the group "Werkstatt der Zeit" with his friends-artists. He was interested in Expressionism and atonality, he initiated a series of concerts to give a performance to the music of the Second Viennese School. Among his works written under its influence are Zehn Klavierstücke (1919), Fünf Gesänge mit Klavier (1919), 32 Variationen über ein achssliges eigenes Thema for orchestra (32 Variations on an Original Eight-Bar Theme,1919), Musik für Klavier in vier Teilen (1920) or Elf Inventionen (1921). Then he joined the Berlin Dada art movement of painters Grosz and Dix. Under the Dada influence he wrote many jazz-inspired compositions. Key works from this period are Fünf Pittoresken (1919), dedicated to Grosz, a three-movement Symphonia germanica (1919) for voice with an accompaniment of an unnamed instrument or a one-movement Sonata erotica (1919) for female voice, imitating coital sighs and cries, then Ironies for piano (six pieces for four hands,1920), a jazz Suite (1921) for chamber orchestra, a dance grotesque Die Mondsüchtige (The Sleep-walker,1925). He was also influenced by Stravinsky, he used successively or in parallel impressionism, expressionism and neo classicism. Schulhoff´s next creative period started when he returned to Prague in 1923. He was successful composer and an internationally appreciated pianist (particularly in Germany). He became a pianist of the Prague Radio Orchestra, and he composed some works especially for live radio broadcast, as well as studio work involving the making of recordings (e.g. The Second Symphony or Concerto for String Quartet, both 1932). It is in this period he became an interpreter of the Hába´s quarter-tone works and other contemporary piano music. As a composer he worked closely with the Zika quartet. He maintained the style of avant-garde but returned to classical music tradition. He was influenced by czech and slavonic folklore and especially by Janáček. He also worked as a publicist. From his works of this period are notable the String Sextet (1920-24) - the first movement still atonal, other from later period neo-classical, with folk elements, the ballet Ogelala (1922-4), the First String Quartet (1924), the First Symphony (1924-5), the Double Concerto for flute, piano and orchestra (1927) and the Concerto for String Quartet and Wind Orchestra (1930). Various musical styles can be found in the musical tragicomedy (opera) Plameny (Flames, 1927-29). He also wrote some jazz compositions - the jazz oratorio H.M.S. Royal Oaks (1930) for speaker, jazz singer, mixed chorus and jazz orchestra, and the famous Hot Sonate (1930) for altsaxophone and piano. In 1930´s Schulhoff turned ideologically and artistically to the socialism. He was influenced by the beggining of the Nazi regime, which caused the end of his career in Germany (for his Jewish origins) and evoked his war memories. He rejected all his previous work and in 1932 he even set the communist manifesto of Marx and Engels to music, as a cantata Das Manifest for four soloists, double mixed chorus, children´s chorus and wind orchestra. He began writing flat and unimaginative transparent music in the style of socialist realism (Symphonies No. 3-6, 1935-42, No.6 from 1940-1 called Symphony of Freedom). Although he continued as a jazz pianist - 1933-35 in Jaroslav Ježek´s jazz orchestra in the avant-garde Osvobozené Divadlo (Free Theatre), and 1935-39 in Ostrava radio. He became a Soviet citizen in 1939. Following the tragic events (occupation of Czechoslovakia) in 1939 he decided to emigrate to the Soviet Union. He was awaiting his Soviet visa when he was arrested in Prague and deported to the Bavarian concentration camp Wülzburg where he died on August 18th 1942. His Symphonies Nos.7and 8 from prison remained unfinished.

    LINKS
    www.musica.cz
    www.musicabona.com
    www.schott-online.com
    perso.club-internet.fr


    Biblography
    J.Bek: Erwin Schulhoff: Leben und Werk (Hamburg, 1994)
    J.Bek: "Erwin Schulhoff", Musik in Theresienstadt (Berlin, 1991)


    Discography

    Orchestral

    Concerto for Piano and Small Orchestra, Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 11
    Jan Simon - piano
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek

    CD Supraphon

    Ogelala - Ballettmysterium nach einem antik-mexikanischen Original
    Beate Bilandzija - soprano
    Staatsphilharmonie Rheinland-Pfalz, Michal Jurowski

    CD CPO

    Symphonie No. 2
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Gerd Albrecht
    CD Orfeo

    Symphonies 1-3
    Philharmonia Hungarica, George Alexander Albrecht
    CD CPO

    Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Supraphon

    Symphonies Nos. 3 and 5
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Supraphon

    Symphonies Nos. 4 and 6
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Supraphon

    Chamber

    2. Suite
    Hanny Schmid Wyss - piano
    CD Swiss Pan

    5 Pitoresken, Partita fur Klavier, 5 Etudes de Jazz, Hot Music (10 Synkopierte Etuden), Suite dansante en jazz pour piano
    Tomas Visek - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Complete String Quartets
    Kocian Quartet
    CD Supraphon

    Concertino for Flute (Piccolo), Viola and Double Bass; Divertissement for Oboe, Clarinet and Bassoon; Bassnachtigall, 3 Vortragsstucke fur Kontrafagot-Solo; Symphonia germanica; Sonata erotica
    Pavel Foltyn - flute, Pavel Perina - viola, Emanuel Kumpera - double bass, Novak Trio, Lubos Fait - double bassoon, Ivan Kusnjer - baritone, Tomas Visek - piano, Diana Stone
    CD Supraphon

    Die Wolkenpumpe
    Petr Matuzsek - baritone
    Ludmila Peterkova - E flat carinet, Jaroslav Kubita - bassoon, Ondrej Roskovec - double bassoon, Svatopluk Zaal - trumpet, Petr Holub and Miroslav Kejmar - percussion

    CD Supraphon

    Esquisses de jazz (1927), Rag-Music (1922)
    Peter Toperczer, Jan Vrana, Emil Leichner, Jan Marcol, Milos Mikula - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Piano Cycles 1919 - 1939
    Tomas Visek - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Piano Sonata No. 3
    Jan Simon - piano
    CD Panton

    Sextet for 2 Violins, 2 Violas and 2 Cellos; Divertimento for String Quartet, Op. 14;
    Duo for Violin and Cello

    Kocian Quartet, Jan Talich - viola, Evzen Rattay - cello
    CD Supraphon

    Sonata for Cello and Piano, Op. 17; Sonata for Flute and Piano; Hot-Sonata (Jazz-Sonata) for Alto Saxophone and Piano
    Jiri Barta - cello, Pavel Foltyn - flute, Stepan Koutnik - alto saxophone, Jan Cech, Tomas Visek - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Sonatas and Suites for Piano
    Tomas Visek - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Sonatas for Violin and Piano No. 1, Op. 7, No. 2; Sonata for Solo Violin; Suite for Violin and Piano, Op. 1; Melody for Violin and Piano
    Ivan Zenaty - violin, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Songs
    Olga Cerna - mezzosoprano, Frantisek Kuda - piano, Jan Jouza - violin
    CD Supraphon


  • Bohumír LIŠKA

    (* 2.10.1914 Čejetičky - † 8.9.1990 Karlovy Vary)

    český dirigent


    Czech conductor

    He studied at the Prague Conservatory with P. Dědeček, composition with O. Šín. From the year 1940 he worked as a répétiteur and conductor in many opera, choir or orchestral bodies. In 1940 he settled in Brno where he became a conductor of opera and Brno Orchestral Association. He was active in Radio, 1942-57 he taught conducting at the Brno Conservatory, in 1951-57 at Janáček Academy of Performing Arts. In 1955 he became an opera's chief of the J. K. Tyl Theatre in Pilsen. He worked here to the year 1967 and influenced its dramaturgical profile. In 1967 he was appointed as a conductor of Smetana Theatre in Prague and permanent guest conductor of Karlovy Vary Symphony Orchestra.


  • Iša KREJČÍ

    (* 10.7.1904 Praha - † 6.3.1968 Praha)

    český skladatel


    Czech composer and conductor

    He died in Prague on March 6th 1968. He was the son of an important Czech philosopher František Krejčí. He studied aesthetics, history and musicology at Charles University (1923-27). In the same time he also attended Prague Conservatory where he studied composition with K.B.Jirák, piano with A.Šíma and conducting with P.Dědeček and V.Talich. In 1927-28 he studied composition in Vítězslav Novák´s masterclass. From 1928 to 1932 he worked as a répétiteur in the Slovak National Theatre in Bratislava. He gained his first experiences as a conductor there as well as in the Prague National Theatre (1933-34). From 1934 to 1945 Krejčí worked as a conductor and producer in the Czechoslovak Radio and from 1936 also as a conductor of the Orchestral Association in Prague. In 1945-58 he was head of the Olomouc Opera, in 1959 he became dramaturgist of the National Theatre in Prague. During the 1964-65 season he was head of an opera company in České Budějovice. Krejčí composed in the style of Neoclassicism. He admired Mozart, together with Bořkovec, Ježek, Holzknecht and Martinů founded the Mánes group. This group of czech composers was interested in contemporary French music of Les Six and Stravinsky. His most successful work is the opera Pozdvižení v Efesu (An Uproar in Ephesus, 1939-43), based on Shakespeare's Comedy of Errors. He wrote another opera (or stage cantata) Antigona (after Sophocles, 1933, rev. 1959-62), and "dramatic scenes" after A.Jirásek Temno (The Darkness, 1944, rev. 1951). From his orchestral works there are four symphonies (1954, 1956, 1961, 1966), Symfonietta-divertimento (1929), Concertino for cello a orchestra (1936), 20 Variations on an Original Theme in the Style of a Folksong (1946), Serenade for orchestra (1948), or 14 variací na píseň "Dobrú noc" (14 Variations on the Song "Goodnight", 1951). His chamber music is represented by Divertimento "Cassation" (1925) for flute, clarinet, trumpet and bassoon, Trio-Divertimento (1935) for oboe, clarinet and bassoon, Trio (1936) for clarinet, doublebass and piano, 3 scherzini (1953) for piano, or string quartets (No.2,1953, No.3, 1960). From Krejčí´s vocal works are 6 písní (6 Songs, 1931) for baritone and piano or orchestra on words by J. Neruda, Antické motivy (Motives from Antiquity, 1936, orch.1940) for a low male voice and piano after J.V.Sládek, 5 písní (5 Songs, 1938) on words by J. A Komenský, or 4 madrigaly (4 Madrigals, 1936) on words by K.H.Mácha for a smaller mixed choir, tenor solo and piano.
    LINKS www.musica.cz www.operone.cz


  • Pavel BOŘKOVEC

    (* 10.6.1894 Praha - † 22.7.1972 Praha)

    český skladatel a pedagog

    He studied philosophy (unfinished), composition with J. B. Foerster and J. Křička, 1925-27 in the masterclasses of the Prague conservatory by J. Suk. His first compositions have a late Romantic orientation. At the end of 20s he interested in modern music trends. He bekame a member of Mánes Music Group in Prague associated with composers such as Martinů. 1946-64 Bořkovec has working as a professor of composition at the Prague Academy of Musical Arts. In the 1930s he was ranked into avant-garde. He combines the style of neo-classicism, constructivism with an expressive lyricism.

    The most important works are the ballet Krysař (The Ratkiller, 1939), the Nonet (1940), Concerto grosso (1941), opera Paleček (Tom Thumb, 1947), String Quartet No. 4 (1947), String Quartet No. 5 (1961), Sinfonietta in uno movimento (1963-64), Silentium turbatum (1965).

    Selected bibliography:
    J. Kasan ed.: Pavel Bořkovec: osobnost a dílo (Pavel Bořkovec. Personality and Work), Praha-Bratislava, 1964.
    V. Holzknecht: Hudební skupina Mánesa (The Music Group Mánes), Praha 1968
    J. Havlík: Česká symfonie 1945-80 (Czech Symphony 1945-80), Praha 1989.
    A. Burešová: Pavel Bořkovec. Život a dílo (Pavel Bořkovec. Life and Work), Olomouc 1994.


  • Antonín ŠVORC

    (* 12.2.1934 Jaroměř - † 21.2.2011 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - basbaryton


    Czech baritone

    He worked in Liberec, from the 1956 in the National Theatre, after he continued as a member of Berlin State Opera. He has been a specialist for Wagnerian roles. He became apparent also in the roles of other heroic tenors. He guested in many countries: in Germany, Swiss, France, Spain or Poland.


  • Vítězslav NOVÁK

    (* 5.12.1870 Kamenice nad Lipou - † 18.7.1949 Skuteč)

    český skladatel a pedagog

    Czech composer and pedagogue

    In 1872 his family moved to Počátky. His father was a physician but he was also active in the choral society, her mother played piano. In Počátky Novák went to primary school and learnt violin and piano. His father died when Novák was eleven and the family moved to Jindřichův Hradec where Novák attended grammar school. He received a schooling in music there but Vilém Pojman, the conductor of the local fire brigade band, was the first to recognize his talent, developed his player ability and encouraged his early efforts in composition. Novák gave his first public performance as pianist in Jindřichův Hradec and composed first songs and piano pieces. In 1889 the family moved to Prague where Novák began to study law and philosophy at Charles University. At the same time he studied at the Prague Conservatory. Here he studied music with Josef Jiránek (piano), Karel Knittl (harmony), and Karel Stecker (counterpoint). In fact first he wanted to become a piano virtuoso. In 1891-92 Novák studied in Antonín Dvořák´s composition master-class. There he was a fellow-student of Josef Suk. In 1894-5 he studied composition under Karel Bendl. During that time he also persuaded his mother that he had to pursue a career in music rather than in law. His first compositions brought him some financial help and he was recommended by Brahms to his Berlin publisher Simrock. In 1896 Novák visited the regions of south-eastern Moravia, Slovácko, Lašsko and Valašsko, later Slovakia as well, and started returning there regularly (mainly to Velké Karlovice). His was strongly influenced by the folk music of those areas. He also met his lifelong love Josefína Javůrková there. He studied the Czech and Moravian folksongs collections (Erben, Sušil, Bartoš) and made his own observations and notations. There was a starting point of his strong personal synthesis of eroticism, nature and folklore of all his works. In 1912 he married, at the age of forty, his former pupil Marie Prášková who gave him a stable family background. They had one son, Jaroslav Novák, who became a painter. Novák was one of the most influential music teachers in Czechoslovakia. In 1909 he succeeded Dvořák as professor of composition at the Prague Conservatory teaching over 100 composers until his retirement in 1939, including many Czechs, Slovaks and southern and eastern Slavs. He also educated many private students. Among his pupils were Ladislav Vycpálek, Jaroslav Křička, Jaroslav Novotný, Boleslav Vomáčka, Václav Štěpán, the brothers Jeremiáš, K.B.Jirák, Alois Hába, one of his last pupils was Ilja Hurník. In the 1920´s Novák was elected rector of Prague Conservatory three times. Vítězslav Novák is considered one of the best Czech classical music composers at the early 20th century. He enjoyed maximal official recognition in that period. His works were performed in Vienna, in Germany and in other foreign countries, and his premieres in Prague and Brno were major social and musical events. He was strongly attached to Brno, his friend Rudolf Reissig was choirmaster of the Beseda Brněnská (succeeding Janáček) where he performed Novák´s works from 1899 to 1920. Novák visited almost every European country apart from Russia, his knowledge of foreign languages - German, English, French, Spanish and Russian - literature, philosophy, fine arts and a vast repertory of European and Czech music, made him one of the leading figures of Czech culture. Novák´s early works are written in a Romantic or late Romantic style, and are influenced by Dvořák, Brahms or Grieg. Through his emphasis on color, he approached impressionism. He became more nationalist under the influence of Janáček. He made use of modern harmony as well. He drew his melodic and harmonic inspiration of Moravian and Slovak folk songs. He composed orchestral works: the dramatic orchestral overture Maryša (1898) after V.a A. Mrštík, the symphonic poem V Tatrách (In the Tatras, 1902, rev.1905,1907),which shows his fascination of nature, here of the Tatra mountains of Slovakia seen in a variety of moods and weathers, the Slovácká suita (Moravian-Slovak Suite, also Slovacko Suite, 1903) for small orchestra, his most popular work which evokes folk rituals of Slovácko, the symphonic poem O věčné touze (Eternal Longing, 1903-5) based on Hans Christian Andersen, the Serenade in D for small orchestra (1905), the symphonic poem Toman a lesní panna (Toman and the Wood Nymph, 1906-7) and the cantata Bouře (The Storm, 1908-10) on words by Svatopluk Čech. In the 1930´s his works are written in more reflective style as the Podzimní symfonie (Autumn Symphony, 1931-4), followed by a turn towards objective patriotism related to political events of the time. He wrote the Jihočeská suita (South Bohemian Suite, 1936-7) for orchestra and the Third String Quartet (1938). In the protests against the Munich events and the establishment of the Protectorate, Novák remained silent for three years. In 1941 he wrote his symphonic poem for large orchestra and organ De profundis, the Svatováclavský triptych (St Wenceslas Triptych) for organ and orchestra and a one-movement Cello Sonata. During the German occupation of Czechoslovakia he showed great personal courage and put in his music patriotic signs. Novák spent most of that period in Skuteč, writing his memoirs (Vítězslav Novák o sobě a o jiných), some small compositions and the Májová symfonie (May Symphony, 1943), a herald of liberation. Novák died in Skuteč, on.7.18th 1949.
    Notable among his other orchestral compositions are the overture Lady Godiva (1907), a musical reworking of the Coventry legend, and the cantata Svatební košile (The Wedding Shift, 1912-13) written after Erben. Novák also wrote several operas, mostly based on Czech classic 19th-century plays , but none of them was a big success. His best-known opera is Lucerna (The Lantern, 1919-22) after Alois Jirásek. He wrote the comique opera Zvíkovský rarášek (The Zvíkov imp, 1913-14), the opera Karlštejn (1914-15) after Vrchlický and Dědův odkaz (The Grandfather´s Legacy, 1922-5). His other stage works are the ballet-pantomimes Signorina Gioventu (1926-28) and Nikotina (1929). Notable from his piano music are Variace na Schumannovo tema (Variations on a Theme of Schumann, 1893), Za soumraku (At Dusk, 1896), Písně zimních nocí (Songs on Winter Night, 1903), Exotikon (1911) and mainly the Sonata Eroica (1900) and Pan (1910, orchestrated 1912), the "symphonic poem for piano". He wrote several string quartets (the First String Quartet, 1899), the Piano Trio (1902) etc. His vocal music (songs, choruses, also with orchestra) is represented by Jarní nálady (Spring Moods, 1900), Melancholie (Melancholy, 1901), Údolí nového království (New Kingdom Valley, 1903), Melancholické písně o lásce (Melancholic Songs about Love, 1906), Erotikon (1912), Síla a vzdor (Strenght and Defiance, 1916-17), 12 ukolébavek na slova lidové poesie moravské (12 Lullabies on Moravian Folk Texts, 1931-2), Domov (Home, 1941), 2 legendy na slova lidové poesie moravské (2 Legends on Moravian Folk Poetry, 1944), Jihočeské motivy (South-Bohemian Motives, 1947).

    Links www.kapralova.org/NOVAK.htm


    Biblography
    Schnierer, Milos: Vítězslav Novák: Tematicky a bibliograficky katalog (Bibliographical Catalogue) (Prague 1999)
    V.Lébl: Vítězslav Novák (Prague 1967, Engl.transl.1968)

    Discography

    Stage works

    Lucerna / The Lantern
    Eva Depoltova, Rene Tucek, Karel Berman, Vaclav Zitek, Anna Barova, Jana Jonasova, Vladimir Dolezal, Vojtech Kocian, Karel Petr, Miroslav Kopp, Dalibor Jedlicka, Drahomira Drobkova, Josef Mixa, Josef Kemr, Bohuslav Cap, Josef Pehr, Ljuba Skorepova
    Prague Radio Chorus, Milan Maly
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Frantisek Vajnar

    2 CD Supraphon

    Signoria Gioventu Ballet - pantomime, Op. 58
    Eternal Longing [O vecne touze], Symphonic Poem, Op. 33
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek

    CD Supraphon

    Nikotina Ballet - pantomime, Op. 59
    Toman and the Wood Nymph [Toman a lesni panna], Symphonic Poem, Op. 40
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek

    CD Supraphon

    The Storm
    Drahomira Tikalova, Maria Tauberova, Beno Blachut, Ladislav Mraz, Vladimir Jedenactik, Jaroslav Veverka
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus, Jan Kuhn
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jaroslav Krombholc

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Storm [Boure]
    Jarmila Zilkova, Jarmila Smyckova, Frantisek Livora, Nadezda Kniplova, Richard Novak, Kvetoslava Nemeckova, Karel Petr, Jaromir Vavruska
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

    CD Supraphon


    Orchestral

    Moravian-Slovak Suite
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    Recorded between 1949 and 1956.

    13 CD Supraphon

    Moravian-Slovak Suite [Slovacka suita] for Small Orchestra, Op. 32
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    CD Supraphon

    Serenade in D, Slovacko Suite [Slovacka suita], Melancholy Songs about Love
    Jana Tetourova - soprano
    Prague Chamber Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek

    CD Supraphon

    South Bohemian Suite [Jihoceska suita], Op. 64, Lady Godiva, Overture, Op. 41, De profundis, Symphonic Poem, Op. 67
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Jaroslav Vogel
    CD Supraphon

    South Bohemian Suite for Large Orchestra, Op. 64 (1936-37)
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Supraphon

    The Valley of the New Kingdom [Udoli noveho kralovstvi], Op. 31
    Zdenek Otava - barytone
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Rudolf Vasata

    CD Radioservis

    In the Tatras (V Tatrách), Op. 26, Moravian-Slovak Suite (Slovacka suita), Op. 32, Eternal Longing (O věčné touze), Op. 33
    Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Virgin Classics

    Toman and the Wood Nymph (Toman a lesni panna), Op. 40, Lady Godiva, Op. 41, De Profundis, Op. 67
    BBC Philharmonic Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Chandos


    Choral

    Erotikon, Op. 46
    Zdena Kloubova - soprano, Vera Mullerova - piano
    CD Panton

    Chamber

    Muj maj / My May, 4 Piano Pieces, Op. 20
    Igor Ardasev - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Pan - A Poem in Tones (1910)
    Frantisek Maxian - piano
    CD Panton

    Sonata eroica, Op. 24, Barcarolles, Op. 10, At Dusk [Za soumraku], Op. 13, Serenades, Op. 9, Bagatelles, Op. 5
    Martin Vojtisek - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Songs on Winter Nights, Op. 30, Reminiscences, Op. 6, Youth [Mladi], Op. 55
    Martin Vojtisek - piano
    CD Panton

    Songs of Winter Nights [Pisne zimnich noci], Op. 30
    Marian Lapsansky - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Songs of Winter Nights, Op. 30, Pan, Op. 43
    Margaret Fingurhut - piano
    CD Chandos

    St Wenceslas triptych [Svatovaclavsky triptych], Prelude on the Love Song from Valassko
    Jaroslav Tuma - organ
    CD Supraphon

    String Quartet No. 2 in D major, Op. 35
    Janacek Quartet (historical recordings of the Czech Radio, Brno)
    CD Multisonic

    Twelve Lullabies on the words of a Moravian folk lullaby for female chorus, Op. 61
    Kuhn Mixed Choir, Pavel Kuhn
    CD Supraphon

    Trio quasi una ballata, Op. 27
    The ArteMiss Piano Trio (Veronika Jiru - violin, Alzbeta Michalova - cello, Jana Vychodilova - piano)
    CD Ultraphon


  • Jaroslav DOUBRAVA

    (* 25.4.1909 Chrudim - † 2.10.1960 Praha)

    český skladatel

    He studied in Prague with Otakar Jeremiáš. He started to compose in the style of Romanticism. Characteristic is his work with harmony and timbre and dramatic character of music. Somber ton-colors are typical for his music (especially in his Third Symphony, 1957-58, or ballet Don Quijote, 1955). He was also influenced by Czech and Moravian folklore (opera Balada o lásce/Ballad on Love, 1960). He used also satire (in his ballet Král Lávra/King Lávra, 1951, Líný Honza/Lazy Honza or Křest sv. Vladimíra/Christening of St. Vladimir). After the war, he wasn't an author favored by state.

    Links:
    www.musica.cz


  • Leoš JANÁČEK

    (* 3.7.1854 Hukvaldy - † 12.8.1928 Ostrava)

    český skladatel a pedagog

    Janáček was born in a small moravian village. He was the ninth of the village schoolmaster's 13 children. At the age of eleven, Janáček came to Brno to study. He was sent to a foundation of the Augustinian 'Queen's' Monastery in Old Brno which took poor but musically gifted boys and trained them in music. Janáček's talent was nourished by the prominent choirmaster Pavel Křížkovský there. After completing his basic schooling he trained as a teacher at the pedagogical institute and, except for a period at the Skuherský Organ School in Prague, he spent 1872-79 largely as a schoolteacher and choral conductor in Brno. In 1879 he attended the Leipzig Conservatory to study composition under the supervision of Leo Grill. He also attended the Vienna Conservatory but left after three months because of an argument with his music supervisor. Janáček's entire activity was centred on Brno. He became a music teacher at the pedagogical institute, in 1881 he founded a college of organists which he directed until 1920. In 1884 Janáček founded a musical journal Hudební listy. He extended his experience as a choirmaster in the Brno Beseda, where he built up the great tradition of that musical body. He was a cofounder of the Russian Club and the Friends of Art Club in Brno; he was also Conservator of the museum. He was also musical editor of Moravské listy (Moravian Folia), contributed to Lidové Noviny (People's News), and published theoretical studies and articles. In 1881 he married one of his piano students, Zdenka Schulzová, but this marriage was not easy - mainly because of Janáček's interest in other women (Gabriela Horvátová, Kamila Stösslová). Janáček also devoted himself to collecting and publishing Moravian folk songs and dances for which he wrote original arrangements, and composed a range of valuable studies. His interest in ethnography led him to study popular speech and create "melodies of speech". He was studying and recording common speech not only for their musical content, but with an eye for all which might affect the speaker: environment, age, experience of life, grief, joy, a hard life. Janáček didn't really come into his prime until very late on in his life. He was 50 when his first really successful opera Její pastorkyňa (Her Stepdaughter), better known as Jenůfa which is his third opera after Šárka (1887, rev. 1888, 1918-19, 1925) and Počátek románu (The Beginning of a Romance, 1891, rev. 1892) was performed in Brno. But outside Moravia he was almost unknown. He was unsuccessful at getting Jenůfa performed in Prague until 1916 and as such it wasn't until he was into his sixties that Janáček really became famous. The head of the opera section of the Prague National Theatre refused the work for twelve years. But when, finally, he decided to produce Jenůfa, he did so splendidly, and thus at least partly compensated Janáček for his undeserved disappointment during the most painful years of his life. During the long period of composition of Jenůfa (1894-1903, rev. 1907, 1908, 1915), he sought his own musical expression in composition, and finished it under extremely tragic circumstances, when his young daughter Olga was dying. With Jenůfa, inspired by Gabriela Preissová's play of the same name, Janáček rethought his approach to opera and to composition in general. He largely abandoned the number opera, integrated folksong firmly into his music and formulated that theory of "speech-melody", based on the natural rhythms and the rise and fall of the Czech language, which was to influence all his ensuing works and give them a particular colour through their jagged rhythms and lines. For the first time Janáček, encouraged by his Prague success, really began to compose. The last years of his life were imbued with a fever of creative, always personal and original, activity. He received public acclaim, was nominated the first honorary doctor of Brno University and the Professor at the Prague Conservatoire. His organ school was also made into a conservatoire, his works came to be known abroad. After Jenůfa he finished his opera Osud (Fate, 1903-5, rev. 1906, 1907), the satiric opera of two parts Výlety pana Broučka (The Excursions of Mr. Brouček, 1917, rev. 1918, 1920) - do Měsíce (to the Moon, separately 1908-13, rev. 1916) and do 15. století (to the 15th century). The next opera Káťa Kabanová (1920-21) is based on a play by Ostrovski, the opera Příhody Lišky Bystroušky (The Cunning Little Vixen, 1922-23, rev. 1924) is composed after Rudolf Těsnohlídek. The inspiration for the next opera Věc Makropulos (The Makropulos Affair, 1923-25) came from Karel Čapek. Janáček's creative development was crowned by his final opera Z mrtvého domu (From the House of the Dead, 1927-28), after Dostojevsky. Vocal music predominates in Janáček's output. Janáček also invented an entirely new way of writing for male and female voice choirs. From the Slezské písně (Silesian Songs, 1918) of Petr Bezruč he chose three poems, Maryčka Magdonová (1906-07), Kantor Halfar (Halfar the Schoolmaster, 1906) and Sedmdesát tisíc (Seventy Thousand, 1909, rev. 1912), and set them to music as a protest against social and national oppression. From other choruses are notable Říkadla (The Nursery Rhymes, 1925/26) and Potulný šílenec (The Wandering Madman, 1922). His most important choral work is Glagolská mše (The Glagolitic Mass, 1926-7) written to an Old Slavonic text demonstrates his Slavism. Notable are the cantatas Amarus (1896-97, rev. 1901, 1906) and Věčné evangelium (The Eternal Gospel, 1913-14). The most outstanding Janáček's symphonic compositions are the Laššské tance (Lachian Dances, 1889-91) and the rhapsody Taras Bulba (1915-18), which shows up his Russophilism, the "balad for orchestra" Šumařovo dítě (The Fiddler's Child, 1913) and the symphonic poem Balada blanická (Ballad of Blaník, 1919) where he expressed his joy at the emergence of the new republic in 1918. His Sinfonietta (1926) took its inspiration from Janáček's love for the town of Brno. Notable among the chamber compositions are the two piano cycles Po zarostlém chodníčku (On the Overgrown Path, 1910-11) and V mlhách (In the Mists, 1912), 1.X.1905 (From the Street, 1 October 1905) for piano (1905-6), the cantata for chamber orchestra Zápisník zmizelého (The Diary of One Who Dissapeared, 1917-20), the two string quartets, First (1923), based on Tolstoy's novella The Kreutzer Sonata, and mainly the Second Listy důvěrné (Intimate letters, 1928), the Concertino (1925) and the Capriccio (1926), and the sextet for wind instruments Mládí (Youth, 1924). Janáček died on 12th August, 1928, in the sanatorium at Ostrava, where he had been taken in a fever from his native Hukvaldy. Janáček is regarded not only as a Czech composer worthy to be ranked with Bedřich Smetana and Antonín Dvořák, but also as one of the most substantial and original opera composers of the 20th century. Even today the world may find originality of thought, a sense of the dramatic, and new values in his work. And the stimulus which the interpretational challenge of his works gives ensures that his creative legacy will live on.


    Links
    www.janacek-nadace.cz
    www.leosjanacek.co.uk


    Janáček´s writings

    ed. J. Racek a L. Firkušný: Janáček´s feuilletons from the Lidové noviny (Prague, 1938, 2/1958, Germ.transl. 1959, 2/1962, abridged Engl.transl. in Tausky, 1982)
    ed. T. Straková: Leoš Janáček: Musik des Lebens: Skizzen, Feuilletons, Studien (Leipzig, 1979)
    ed. and transl. V. a M. Tausky: Leoš Janáček: Leaves from his Life (London, 1982)
    ed. and transl. M. Zemanová: Janáček´s Uncollected Essays on Music (London, 1989)
    ed. J. Procházková: Leoš Janáček: Památník pro Kamilu Stösslovou (Album for Kamila Stösslová) (Brno, 1994, Germ.transl. 1994, Engl.transl. 1996)

    Biblography
    B. Štědroň: Dílo Leoše Janáčka: abecední seznam Janáčkových skladeb a úprav (Janáček's works: an alphabetical catalogue of Janáček´s compositions and arrangements) (Prague, 1959, Engl. transl. 1959 as The Works of Leoš Janáček)
    N. Simeone: The First Editions of Leoš Janáček: a Bibliography (Tutzing, 1991)
    N. Simeone, J. Tyrrell and A. Němcová: Janáček's Works: a Catalogue of the Music and Writings of Leoš Janáček (Oxford, 1997)
    Z. E. Fischmann, ed. and transl.: Janáček-Newmarch Correspondence (Rockville, MD, 1986)
    C. Susskind: Janáček and Brod (New Haven, CT, and London, 1985)
    B. Štědroň, ed.: Janáček ve vzpomínkách a dopisech (Janáček in reminiscences and letters) (Prague, 1946, Engl.transl. 1955)
    J. Tyrrell, ed. and transl.: Intimate Letters: Leoš Janáček to Kamila Stösslová (London, 1994)
    J. Tyrrell, ed. and transl.: My Life with Janáček: the Memoirs of Zdenka Janáčková (London, 1998)
    M. Černohorská: Leoš Janáček (Prague, 1966, in Engl., Fr., Ger., Russ.)
    G. Erismann: Janáček, ou La passion de la vérité (Paris, 1980)
    H. Hollander: Leoš Janáček: his Life and Works (London, 1963, Germ.orig. 1964)
    K. Honolka: Leoš Janáček: sein Leben, sein Werk, seine Zeit (Stuttgart and Zurich, 1982)
    I. Horsbrugh: Leoš Janáček: the Field that Prospered (Newton Abbot and London, 1981)
    D. Muller: Leoš Janáček (Paris, 1930)
    J. Procházková a B. Volný: Narozen na Hukvaldech (Born in Hukvaldy) (Brno, 1994, Engl. transl. 1995)
    F. Pulcini: Janáček: vita, opere, scritte (Turin and Florence, 1993)
    J. Racek: Leoš Janáček: Mensch und Kunstler (Leipzig, 1962, 2/1971)
    J. Vogel: Leoš Janáček: Leben und Werk (Kassel, 1958, Engl. transl. 1962, 3/1997)

    Discography

    Operas

    Fate [Osud]
    Vilem Pribyl, Magdalena Hajossyova, Vladimir Krejcik, Richard Novak
    Brno Janacek Opera Chorus and Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek

    CD Supraphon

    From the House of the Dead [Z mrtveho domu]
    Richard Novak, Vilem Pribyl, Jaroslav Horacek, Beno Blachut, Ivo Zidek a. o.
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    Grand Prix audiovisuel de L'Europe del Academie du disque Francais

    2 CD Supraphon

    Jenufa
    Gabriela Benackova, Nadezda Kniplova, Anna Barova, Vilem Pribyl, Vladimir Krejcik, Karel Berman, Vaclav Halir, Kveta Belanova, Jindra Pokorna, Daniela Suryova, Cecilie Stradalova, Jaroslava Janska
    Brno Janacek Opera Chorus and Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek
    Orphee d'or de L'Academie Nationale du disque lyrique

    2 CD Supraphon

    Jenufa
    Elisabeth Soderstrom, Eva Randova, Marie Mrazova, Wieslav Ochman, Petr Dvorsky, Vaclav Zitek, Dalibor Jedlicka, Ivana Mixova, Lucia Popp, Vera Soukopova, Jindra Pokorna, Jana Jonasova, Vera Soukopova
    Wiener Staatsopernchor, Norbert Balatsch
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Sir Charles Mackerras

    2 CD Decca

    Kata Kabanova
    Capriccio, Concertino

    Jitka Pavlova - mezzo-soprano, Zdenek Svehla - tenor, Dalibor Jedlicka - bass, Peter Dvorsky - tenor, Gertrude Jahn - mezzo-soprano, Elisabeth Soderstrom - soprano, Libuse Marova - mezzo-soprano, Nadezda Kniplova - contralto, Vladimir Krejcik - tenor, Jaroslav Soucek - baritone, Hedwig Drechler - mezzo-soprano, Adolf Tomaschek - tenor, Paul Crossley - piano
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Wiener Staatsopernchor, London Sinfonietta, Sir Charles Mackerras, David Atherton

    2 CD Decca

    Kata Kabanova
    Drahomira Tikalova, Beno Blachut, Bohumir Vich, Ludmila Komancova, Zdenek Kroupa a. o.
    Prague National Theatre Chorus and Orchestra, Jaroslav Krombholc

    2 CD Supraphon

    Kata Kabanova
    Ludek Vele, Peter Straka, Eva Randova, Miroslav Kopp, Gabriela Benackova, Josef Kundlak, Zdenek Harvanek, Martina Bauerova, Dana Buresova
    Chorus of the Prague National Theatre
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras

    2 CD Supraphon

    Opera Suites
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon

    The Beginning of a Romance [Pocatek romanu]
    Jaroslava Janska, Anna Barova, Jindra Pokorna, Vladimir Krejcik, Vilem Pribyl, Frantisek Caban, Jan Hladik, Richard Novak
    Brno Janacek Opera Chorus, Josef Pancik
    Brno Janacek Opera Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek
    World premiere on CD

    CD Multisonic

    The Cunning Little Vixen
    Orchestral Suite

    Dalibor Jedlicka, Eva Zigmundova, Vladimir Krejcik, Richard Novak, Vaclav Zitek, Beno Blachut, Ivana Mixova, Lucia Popp, Libuse Marova, Gertrude Jahn, Eva Hribikova, Zuzana Hudecova, Peter Saray, Miriam Ondraskova, Eva Randova
    Wiener Staatsopernchor, Helmut Froschauer, Bratislava Children's Choir, Elena Sarajova
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Sir Charles Mackerras

    2 CD Decca

    The Cunning Little Vixen [Prihody Lisky Bystrousky]
    Magdalena Hajossyova, Gabriela Benackova, Richard Novak, Miroslav Frydlewicz, Karel Prusa a. o.
    Kuhn Childerns Chorus, Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Excursions of Mr. Broucek [Vylety pana Broucka]
    Vilem Pribyl, Richard Novak, Jana Jonasova, Miroslav Svejda, Bohuslav Marsik, Vladimir Krejcik a. o.
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Fate [Osud]
    Peter Straka, Livia Aghova, Marta Benackova, Stefan Margita, Peter Mikulas, Ivan Kusnjer, Ludmila Novakova
    Prag Chamber Choir
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Gerd Albrecht
    Live recording

    CD Orfeo

    The Makropulos Case
    The Lachian Dances

    Elisabeth Soderstrom, Peter Dvorsky, Vladimir Krejcik, Anna Czakova, Vaclav Vitek, Zdenek Svehla, Dalibor Jedlicka, Beno Blachut
    Wiener Staatsopernchor
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Sir Charles Mackerras (The Makropulos Case)
    London Philharmonic Orchestra, Francois Huybrechts (The Lachian Dances)
    This recording was awarded the special prize by Diapason and Le Mande de la Musique

    2 CD Decca

    Sarka
    Eva Urbanova - soprano, Peter Straka - tenor, Ivan Kusnjer - baritone, Jaroslav Brezina - tenor
    Prague Philharmonic Choir, Jaroslav Brych
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras
    world premiere recording

    CD Supraphon


    Other vocal and orchestral music

    Folk Ballads
    Dagmar Peckova - mezzo-soprano, Ivan Kusnjer - baritone, Marian Lapsansky - piano
    Prague Philharmonic Chorus members, Pavel Kuhn

    CD Supraphon

    From the House of the Dead, Mladi / Youth, Rikadla / Children's Rhymes
    Jiri Zahradnicek, Ivo Zidek, Vaclav Zitek, Dalibor Jedlicka, Antonin Svorc, Jaroslava Janska, Vladimir Krejcik, Richard Novak, Beno Blachut, Zdenek Svehla, Eva Zigmundova, Zdenek Sousek, Jaroslav Sousek
    Wiener Staatsopernchor
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Sir Charles Mackerras (From the House of the Dead)
    London Sinfonietta and Chorus, David Atherton (Youth, Children's Rhymes)

    2 CD Decca

    Glagolitic Mass [Glagolska mse]
    Elisabeth Soderstrom, Drahomira Drobkova, Frantisek Livora, Richard Novak
    Jan Hora - organ
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Charles Mackerras

    CD Supraphon

    Glagolitic Mass [Glagolská mše], Amarus - Cantata for Soloists, Mixed Chorus and Orchestra
    Gabriela Benackova, Eva Randova, Vilem Pribyl, Sergej Kopcak, Kvetoslava Nemeckova, Leo Marian Vodicka, Vaclav Zitek
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus, Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Charles Mackerras

    CD Supraphon

    Glagolitic Mass [Glagolská mše] for Soloists, Chorus, Orchestra and Organ after an Old Slavonic text
    The Eternal Gospel [Vecne evangelium] - Legends for Soloists, Chorus and Orchestra

    Eva Drizgova, Hana Stolfova-Bandova, Vladimir Dolezal, Jiri Sulzenko
    Martin Jakubicek - organ, Pavel Wallinger - violin solo
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus of Brno, Leos Svarovsky

    CD Ultraphon

    Glagolitic Mass for Soloists, Mixed Choir, Organ and Orchestra after an Old Slav Text (1926, rev. 1929)
    Taras Bulba. Rhapsody for Orchestra after N. V. Gogol's novel (1915-1918)

    Libuse Domaninska, Vera Soukupova, Beno Blachut, Eduard Haken
    Jaroslav Vodrazka - organ
    Prague Philharmonic Choir, Josef Veselka
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    Golden Harmony Award 2002

    CD Supraphon

    Good Night [Dobrou noc] - part 7 from piano cycle On the overgrown path
    Our Evenings [Nase vecery] - part 1 from piano cycle On the overgrown path
    On the overgrown path [Po zarostlem chodnicku] - part 11 from the piano cycle On the overgrown path

    Iva Bittova - voice, violin, viola
    Nederlands Blazers Ensemble

    CD Indies Records

    Idyll for String Orchestra, Suite for String Orchestra
    Norwegian Chamber Orchestra, Iona Brown
    CD Chandos

    Lachian Dances, Suite for Strings, Idyll for Strings
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek
    CD Supraphon

    Little Queens, Folk Poetry from Hukvaldy, Folk Nocturnes, Nursery Rhymes [Rikadla]
    E. Struplova - sopran, S. Predota - tenor, A. Skoumal, H. Barton - piano
    Severacek - childrens choir, Milan Uherek / Lukas Cerny
    Chamber Ensemble

    CD Studio Matous

    Moravian Folk Poetry in Songs
    Magdalena Kozena - mezzosoprano, Graham Johnson - piano
    CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Moravian Folk Poetry in Songs [Moravska lidova poezie v pisnich]
    Dagmar Peckova - mezzo-soprano, Ivan Kusnjer - baritone, Marian Lapsansky - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Nursery Rhymes [Rikadla], Kaspar Rucky, The 70,000, The Wolf's Trail [Vlci stopa], Elegy on the death of my daughter Olga [Elegie na smrt dcery Olgy], Songs of Hradcany [Hradcanske pisnicky], Ave Maria, Our Father [Otce nas]
    New London Chamber Choir
    The Critical Band, James Wood

    CD Hyperion

    Romance
    Josef Suk - violin
    Prague Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk

    CD Lotos

    Sinfonietta
    Karolina Dvorakova - soprano, Ivan Zenaty - violin
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek

    CD Supraphon

    Sinfonietta
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek
    CD Supraphon

    Sinfonietta, Taras Bulba, Lachian Dances, Suite for string orchestra, Mladi (Youth) for wind sextet, Capriccio, Concertino
    Antony Pay - clarinet, Janet Craxton - oboe, Martin Gatt - bassoon, Michael Harris - bass clarinet, Phillip Eastop - french horn, Sebastian Bell - flute, Paul Crossley - piano
    Wiener Philharmoniker, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, Piccolo, London Sinfonietta, Sir Charles Mackerras, Francois Huybrechts, Neville Marriner, Sir Neville Marriner, David Atherton

    2 CD Decca

    Sinfonietta, Glagolitic Mass
    Libuse Domaninska - soprano, Marie Jurenova - contralto, Josef Valka - tenor, Jaroslav Hromadka - bass, Frantisek Michalek - organ
    Moravan Academic Singing Association, The Vach Moravian Lady Teachers' Choir, Josef Veselka
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
    Brno Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bretislav Bakala

    CD Supraphon

    Sinfonietta, Taras Bulba - Rhapsody for Orchestra
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon

    Sinfonietta (1926)
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    CD Supraphon

    Suita for String Orchestra
    Czech Chamber Orchestra, Ondrej Kukal
    CD Waldmann

    Suite for Strings
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD SKO

    Taras Bulba
    Brno State Philharmonic Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek
    CD Supraphon

    Taras Bulba, Rhapsody for Orchestra
    The Cunning Little Vixen [Prihody Lisky Bystrousky], Suite from the Opera
    Czech Philharonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich

    CD Supraphon

    Taras Bulba (Rhapsody for Orchestra), Amarus (Cantata for Soli, Mixed Chorus and Orchestra), Sinfonietta
    Soloists and choruses
    Brno Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bretislav Bakala

    CD Panton

    Taras Bulba - Rhapsody for Orchestra, Sinfonietta, Dunaj - Symphonic Fragment
    Brno Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Bretislav Bakala
    CD Multisonic

    The Diary of One Who Disappeared [Zapisnik zmizeleho] for Tenor, Contralto, 3 Female Voices and Piano
    Nicolai Gedda - tenor, Vera Soukupova - contralto, Beno Blachut - tenor, Stepanka Stepanova - contralto
    Prague Radio Chamber Female Chorus, Miroslav Kosler
    Czech Singers' Chamber Female Chorus, Jan Kuhn
    Josef Palenicek - piano

    CD Supraphon

    The Diary of One Who Disappeared [Zapisnik zmizeleho] for tenor, contralto, three female voices and piano on poetry by Ozef Kalda
    Piano Sonata 1. X. 1905, "From the Street" in E flat minor
    Peter Straka - tenor, Dagmar Peckova - contralto
    Marian Lapsansky - piano
    Members of the Prague Chamber Choir

    CD Supraphon

    The Wandering of a Little Soul [Putovani dusicky] (Violin Concerto)
    Sinfonietta, Taras Bulba - Rhapsody for Orchestra, Schluck und Jau

    Josef Suk - violin
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann

    CD Supraphon


    Chamber instrumental music

    Capriccio, Concertino, 1. X. 1905
    Daniel Wiesner - piano
    CD Panton

    Concertino for Piano, Two Violins, Viola, Clarinet, French Horn and Bassoon
    Capriccio for Piano Left Hand and Wind Ensemble

    Rudolf Firkusny - piano
    Members of Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann

    CD Supraphon

    In the Mist, Sonate 1. X. 1905, On an Overgrown Path I, On an Overgrown Path II, On an Overgrown Path (Paralipomena), A recollection
    Andras Schiff - piano
    CD ECM

    In the Mist [V mlhach]
    Hana Dvorakova - piano
    CD MusicVars

    In the Mists, Sonata for Piano "1st October 1905 - Street Scene"
    Martin Kasik - piano
    CD Ultraphon

    Intimate Sketches, Moravian Dances
    Marian Lapsansky - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Quartet No. 1 after Tolstoy´s "Kreutzer Sonata"
    Quartet No. 2 for two violins, viola and cello - "Intimate Letters"

    Orpheus Quartet (Charles-Andre Linale - violin, Emilian Piedicuta - violin, Emile Cantor - viola, Laurentiu Sbarcea - cello)
    CD Emergo Classics

    Sonata, On An Overgrown Path, In the Mist
    Ivan Klansky - piano
    CD Kontrapunkt

    Sonata 1. X. 1905 "Z ulice", V mlhach / In the Mists
    Ivan Moravec - piano
    CD Hanssler

    Sonata for Violin and Piano
    Ivan Straus - violin, Walter Haley - piano
    CD Clarton

    Sonata for Violin and Piano
    Ivan Zenaty - violin, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Multisonic

    Sonata for Violin and Piano
    Pavel Sporcl - violin, Petr Jirikovsky - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Sonata for Violin and Piano (1914-1922)
    Josef Suk - violin, Jan Panenka - piano
    CD Supraphon

    String Quartet No. 1 "Inspired by Tolstoy's Kreutzer Sonata"
    Epoque Quartet (Martin Valek - violin, Vladimir Klansky - violin, Vladimir Kroupa - viola, Vit Petrasek - cello)
    CD Radioservis

    String Quartet No. 1 "Kreutzer Sonata" , String Quartet No. 2 "Intimate Pages" , On a Overgrown Path
    Talich Quartet (Petr Messiereur, Jan Kvapil - violins, Jan Talich - viola, Evzen Rattay - cello)
    Radoslav Kvapil - piano
    special prize by Le Grand Prix du Disque

    CD Calliope

    String Quartet No. 1 "Kreutzer Sonata", No. 2 "Intimate Pages", Youth [Mladi], Wind Sextet
    Talich Quartet, Prague Wind Quintet, Petr Cap - bass clarinet
    CD Supraphon

    String Quartet No. 1 - Inspired by L. N. Tolstoy's Kreutzer Sonata (1923)
    String Quartet No. 2, "Intimate Letters" (1928)

    Janacek Quartet (Jiri Travnicek - 1st violin, Adolf Sykora - 2nd violin, Jiri Kratochvil - viola, Karel Krafka - cello)
    CD Supraphon

    String Quartet No. 1, after Tolstoy's Kreutzer Sonata
    M. Nostitz Quartet (Petr Bernasek - 1st violin, Vaclav Vacek - 2nd violin, Pavel Horejsi - viola, Petr Sporcl - cello)
    CD Ultraphon

    String Quartet no.1, String Quartet no.2
    Hagen Quartett - String Quartet
    CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Youth [Mladi], Wind Sextet
    The Brno Wind Quintet and J. Sedlacek - bass clarinet
    The Brno Wind Quintet (P. Pomkla - flute, piccolo, L. Bartonik - oboe, V. Spilka - clarinet, R. Novozamsky - bassoon, T. Kopecky - french horn)

    CD Artimus


  • Josef Bohuslav FOERSTER

    (* 30.12.1859 Praha - † 29.5.1951 Nový Vestec)

    český hudební skladatel, publicista a pedagog

    He is an important member of the generation of Czech music composing between the wars. He studied at the Prague Organ School, 1882-8 he worked as an organist by the Church of St. Vojtěch, 1889-94 as a choirmaster by the Church of Panna Maria Sněžná, he was also a teacher of singing and a writer for the paper Národní listy.

    After his moving to Hamburg with his wife soprano Berta Lauterer, he worked as a music critic writer and piano teacher at the conservatory. In 1903 they moved to Vienna.

    Foerster taught at Vienna Conservatory and wrote for many music journals.

    As a composer, he was very popular for his choirs: Oráč (Ploughman), Velké širé rodné lány (Large Homelands), Polní cestou (On the Field Path), Z osudu rukou (From the Hands of Fate).

    From the year 1897 he became a member of Czech Academy of Sciences, in 1931-39 in the function of its president.

    He wrote also six operas (Eva, Debora, Jessika, Bloud/Heart, Naïve Person, Nepřemožení). The opera Eva (1897) opened the way to the Czech Realism.

    He wrote also many volumes of memories: Poutník (Pilgrim, 1929), Poutníkovy cesty (Pilgrim's Ways, 1932), Poutník v Hamburku (Pilgrim in Hamburg, 1938), Poutník v cizině (Pilgrim abroad, 1947).


  • Václav KAPRÁL

    (* 26.3.1889 Určice - † 6.4.1947 Brno)

    český skladatel, klavírista a pedagog

    He studied composition with Leoš Janáček in his Brno Organ School (1908-10) and with Vítězslav Novák (1919-20) in Prague. Later he studied piano interpretation with Alfred Cortot in Paris (1923-24).

    Kaprál was an excellent pianist. Together with Ludvík Kundera he played concerts of music for two pianos (1921-30). They two also initiated founding of the Moravian Composers' Club in Brno in 1922. Kaprál worked as a piano teacher and in 1911 he founded his own private music school in Brno-Královo Pole. He also worked as choirmaster and music theoretician and critic.

    Kaprál married singer Viktorie Uhlířová, in 1915 their daughter Vítězslava who later became successful composer was born.

    In 1927 Václav Kaprál was appointed reader in music at the university in Brno. In 1935 he became member of the Czech Academy of Arts and Sciences, in 1936 he was elected vice-president of the Czech Section of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM). From 1936 he was professor of theory at the Brno Conservatory.

    During the German occupation of Czechoslovakia his left-wing political opinions caused him to be arrested by Gestapo in 1942. He was imprisoned in the concentration camp Svatobořice until April 1945. In 1946 he was elected the first chairman of the Syndicate of Czechoslovak Composers but his health had broken and he died soon.

    Kaprál composed about fifty opuses. He concentrated on works for his instrument piano and on vocal and chamber compositions. Piano music - four Sonatas (1912, 1921, 1924, 1939), three Sonatinas, Suita romantica (1918), atonal Miniatures (1922), Lyrica (1927) and Fantasy in Es (1934). Chamber music - two string quartets, his last composition Balad for violoncello (1946). Vocal compositions - Pro ni (For her, 1927) for voice and piano quartet, Píseň podzimu (Song of Autumn, 1929) for voice and string quartet, Uspávanky (Lullabies, 1932) for voice and chamber orchestra, Milodějné kvítí (Flowers of Love, 1942) dedicated to the memory of his daughter Vítězslava who died in 1940, Svatobořické lidové písně (Folksongs from Svatobořice, 1944). From the music from the concentration camp - Hradišťská idyla (1944) and Česká mše (Czech Mass, 1943).

    Links:
    www.kapralova.org

    Discography
    Ukolébavka / Lullaby
    Martina Caithamelova - soprano
    Bambini di Praga, B. Kulinska / B. Kulinsky

    CD Multisonic


  • Mirko OČADLÍK

    (* 1.3.1904 Holešov - † 26.6.1964 Praha)

    český muzikolog


    Czech musicologist and pedagogue

    He studied music and musicology in Vienna, history and aesthetics at Prague Charles University (graduated 1932). He took the doctorate in 1946 at the same University with a disertation about Smetana´s Libuše (ed. in 1949). In 1928-50 he worked in Czechoslovak Radio, he was an editor of music department of the publishing house Melantrich (1939-45). He founded the musical journal Klíč (1930-34) oriented to the contemporary Modern music. Očadlík worked in 1927-34 for the Society for Modern Music based in Prague. In 1956 he founded the University journal Miscellanea musicologica. After establishing of Academy of Arts he became teaching here as a head of Music theory department. In the same year he began lectures also at Prague University were he took place of professor and head of the department of musicology (1952-59). In 1954-58 he became a dean of the Arts Faculty, from 1959 director of the Institute for Czech Music History. In 1956 he received the DrSc. Most of his books is concentrated on Smetana´s works and Smetana´s successors (Eliška Krásnohorská and Bedřich Smetana, Prague 1940, Notebook of Smetana´s Motifs, Prague 1942, Libuše, Prague 1949, Small Collection of Smetaniana, 1960, Smetana´s Compositionnal Methods, OM, 1970). He is an editor of many Smetana´s librettos, piano music and other documentation. From other publications there were especially The World of the Orchestra, Prague 1942-46, which is used till now.


  • František SUŠIL

    (* 14.6.1804 Rousínov - † 31.5.1868 Bystřice pod Hostýnem)

    český sběratel lidových písní, filosof a teolog


    Moravian priest, folksong collector and literary scholar

    He was educated at Kroměříž, Baroque music centre. In 1827 he settled to Brno. He was interested in Moravian and Silesian folklore. By 1835 he published the first folksong collection in Moravia Moravian Folksongs (Brno 1835, rev. And enlarged in 1840). It contains 2091 tunes and 2361 texts. It includes all kind of folksongs: dances-songs, ballads, ceremonial songs and others. He use the abstract metres used in Classical music - mostly 2/4 or 3, but it is not real time organisation of the Moravian folklore. This collection became regardless a good source for other musicologists in future (Dvořák, Janáček, Martinů, Novák).


  • Theodor SCHAEFER

    (* 23.1.1904 Telč - † 19.3.1969 Brno)

    český skladatel

    Czech conductor, composer and pedadogue

    In 1922-26 he studied composition under Kvapil and conducting under Neumann at the Brno Conservatory. From 1926 to 1929 Schaefer studied composition in Novák´s masterclass in Prague. From 1930 he worked as a teacher at music school in Kutná Hora. In 1934 he settled in Brno where he taught at Kaprál´s music school, then composition and theory at Brno Conservatory. In 1959 he started to teach at the Janáček´s Academy. In 1930´s and 40´s Schaefer conducted amateur choirs and orchestras. In 1960´s he was a head of the Brno branch of the Union of Czechoslovak Composers. He also directed the newly established International Music Festival in Brno. Schaefer´s compositional style was influenced by Novák, later by western European avant-garde. He had set to music a piece by G. Neveux Julie aneb snář (Juliet or The Dreambook, 1933-4) four years before Martinů used this work. His other outstanding works are the Third String Quartet (1944-5), the ballet cycle Legenda o štěstí (Legend of Happiness, 1949-54) after Svatopluk Čech, the Diathema for viola and orchestra (1955-6), the Barbar a růže (Barbarian and the Rose, 1957-8), the Symphony (1959-62), the Rapsodická reportáž (Rapsodic reportage, 1960) for symphonic orchestra.

    Biblography
    J.Havlík: Česká symfonie 1945-1980 (Czech Symphony) (Prague, 1989)


    Links
    www.kapralova.org



  • Petr EBEN

    (* 22.1.1929 Žamberk - † 24.10.2007 Praha)

    český skladatel, varhaník a klavírista

    Petr Eben is one of the leading composers of the Czech Republic. After the war, he entered the Prague Academy of Music (piano with F. Rauch and composition with Pavel Bořkovec). As early as 1955 he took up a teaching post in the History of Music Department at Prague's Charles University. In 1978-79 he was professor of composition at the Royal Northern College of Music Manchester. From 1990 he became professor of composition at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague and President of the Prague Spring Festival. He is active as a performing artist, especially as an improviser on piano and organ (concerts in London - RFH and Westminster Cathedral, Paris - Notre Dame and Festivals in Melbourne, Edinburgh, Vienna, Berlin, USA), but his main activity is composing. Two main sources of his inspiration are the plain chant and the folk songs. He has written a large number of varied works in all genres, the oratory Apologia Socratus, the ballet Curses and Blessings, written for the Holland Festival 1983, the concert symphony Noční hodiny (Night Hours) for Leipzig, Prague Nocturne for the Vienna Philharmonic, the 2nd Organ Concerto for the opening of the new organ of Radio Vienna, Missa cum populo for the Avignon Festival, the oratory Sacred Symbols for the Salzburg Cathedral, the Church-Opera Jeremiah and more. He was awarded many prizes for his works: 1990 - by the Czech Government for his organ cycle Job, 1991 - he received the Order Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres from French Minister of Culture, in 1992 he was nominated Professor H. C. of the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, in 1993 - he received the Stamitz Prize of the German Kunstlergilde, and in 1994 - the doctor's degree h. c. of Charles University in Prague.

    Links: 
    www.musica.cz


  • Otakar OSTRČIL

    (* 25.2.1879 Praha - † 20.8.1935 Praha)

    český skladatel, dirigent a pedagog

    Czech composer and conductor

    He studied modern languages at Prague University with Jan Gebauer, Otakar Hostinský and Tomáš Garigue Masaryk. From 1903 to 1919 he worked as a teacher of Czech and German at the Prague Czech-Slavonic Commercial Academy. He studied music privately, piano with Mikeš, later with Fibich. With Fibich he also studied composition and worked as his amanuensis. Together with teaching activity of Novák, Foerster and Suk, Ostrčil was the most influential personality of Czech musical life of that period continuing the tradition of great Czech Romantics of the 19th century. He worked as a conductor of the Academy Choir and Orchestral Association in Prague, later became guest conductor at the National Theatre. In 1920 Ostrčil became Chief of the Opera of the National Theatre. He remained in this function until his death in 1935. In the history of the National Theatre his progressive programme conception and high level of all theatre professions represent one of its most important eras. As a composer he came out of Fibich, he was admirer of Smetana and Mahler. He could use all means of expression of the Romantic composers. He is renowned for his erosion of traditional tonality and tonally free polyphony. His notable orchestral compositions are Pohádka o Šemíku (Tale of Šemík, 1899), symphonic poem after J. Vrchlický, Symphony in A (1905), Impromptu (1911), Suite in c (1912), Symfonietta (1921), symphonic poem Léto (Summer, 1925-6) and the 14 symphonic programatic variations on composer´s own theme Křížová cesta (Calvary or Stations of the Cross, 1928) which are one of the greatest works of Czech music of the 20th century. Ostrčil also composed operas: Kunálovy oči (Kunal´s Eyes, 1908), the one-act singspiel Poupě (The Bud, 1910), Legenda z Erinu (Legend from Erin, 1913-19) after Julius Zeyer, or Honzovo království (Johnny´s Kingdom, 1933), written on the motifs of a tale by L. N. Tolstoy. He wrote two melodramas - Balada o mrtvém ševci a mladé tanečnici (Ballad of the Dead Cobbler and the Young Dancer, 1904) and Balada česká (Czech Ballad, 1905) to the words of Jan Neruda. He composed ballads, e.g. Osiřelo dítě (The Orphaned Child, 1906), ballad for mezzo-soprano and orchestra to the text of a folk-song. Ostrčil´s other outstanding vocal compositions are the male chorus after J. Vrchlický Česká legenda vánoční (Czech Christmas Legend, 1912), the cantata Legenda o svaté Zitě (The Legend of St. Zita, 1913) for tenor solo, mixed choir, orchestra and organ, and Prosté motivy (Simple Motifs, 1922) to the words of Jan Neruda. Sonatina for viola, violin and piano (1925) and String Quartet in B (1899) represent his chamber music.

    Links
    www.musica.cz
    www.klassika.info


    Biblography
    J. Bartoš: Otakar Ostrčil (Prague, 1936)
    F. Pala, V. Pospíšil: Opera Národního divadla v období Otakara Ostrčila (The National Theatre opera in Ostrčil´s time) (Prague, 1962-89)
    J. Tyrrell: Czech Opera (Cambridge, 1988)


    Discography


    Variations for Large Orchestra, Op. 24 "Calvary"
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon


  • Bedřich SMETANA

    (* 2.3.1824 Litomyšl - † 12.5.1884 Praha)

    český skladatel, zakladatel české národní hudby

    Czech composer and pianist

    His father was a brewer and music lover who gave Smetana much musical traning together with several local teachers. The family was constantly on the move, and Smetana went to gymnasium in Jindřichův Hradec, Jihlava, Havlíčkův Brod, Prague and Plzen, where he graduated after problematic studies under the supervision of his cousin. He decided to devote himself only to music and he went on to train as a pianist in Prague. He succeeded in becoming a teacher but failed to be recognised as a virtuoso performer. At first he earned a precarious living. In 1844 he became resident piano teacher to Count Leopold Thun's family, which provided him with the goodly financial means, he also played regularly to the deposed Emperor Ferdinand. He could also start to study privately harmony, counterpoint and composition with Josef Proksch. In 1848, Smetana composed Six Characteristic Compositions for the solo piano and dedicated it to Liszt. He sent his work to Liszt together with the demand for his financial help. Liszt was not able to provide the money but he arranged for the work to be published in Leipzig. The young and terribly under-estimated composer became more self-confident and mobilized himself into the battle for recognition with renewed vigour and perseverence. This was also beggining of the friendship between Liszt and Smetana. With the help of Franz Liszt, he established a music school in Prague in 1848 and the next year he married Kateřina Kolářová, whom for several years had been his pupil. Their marriage was fraught with tradegy. Only one of their four children survived infancy. Revolutions after revolutions shook Bohemia and the rest of Europe in 1848. Smetana's patriotic feelings was awakened by the Prague Revolution which collapsed and German culture remained official for Bohemia - Smetana´s education was also in German. In 1856, after years of desperate subsistence living in Prague, he accepted an appointment at Göteborg, Sweden, where he was in demand as a pianist, teacher and conductor. He stayed there until 1861. Inspired by Liszt's example, he composed his first symphonic poems, in this period not yet reflecting his nationalism - Richard III (1857-8), Valdštejnův tábor (Wallenstein's Lager, 1858-9) and Hakon Jarl (1860-1). His wife died in 1859, and he remarried (with Bettina Ferdinandová), then two years later returned to his native land. At Prague he opened a music institute and became choirmaster of the recently established Czech choral society Hlahol. He worked as the music critic of Národní listy. He started to study Czech language properly and to express himself only in Czech. His position in Czech society slowly became more secure. He was also appointed as first chairman of the music section of the Umělecká Beseda, the society recently founded to promote Czech artistic culture. Smetana is known as father of the Czech opera. He wrote 9 operas all together, all on national subjects. In 1866 his opera, Braniboři v Čechách (The Brandenburgers In Bohemia, 1862-3) which was his first work based on national theme had its premier. It was not very sucessful but Smetana's second opera Prodaná nevěsta (The Bartered Bride, 1863-6, 1868-9, 1869, definitive version 1870) staged in the same season, immediately became a popular work. It presented a genial picture of village life in Bohemia and reflected the spirit of Czech folk music and dance. After the success of The Bartered Bride, he achieved recognition and became the principal conductor of the newly established Czech opera house in Prague, the Provisional Theatre. He retained that post until 1874, when he became deaf. The opera Libuše (1869-72) was performed at the opening of the National Theatre in Prague in 1881 and together with Dalibor (1865-7, 1870) is the most patriotic Smetana´s opera. Libuše deals with the legendary founding of the Premyslid Dynasty, and culminates in Libuše's inspired prophecies of the heroes whose deeds would be chronicled and bring lustre to the entire Czech nation. His other operas are Dvě vdovy (The Two Widows, 1873-4, 1877), Hubička (The Kiss, 1875-6), Tajemství (The Secret, 1877-8), Čertova stěna (The Devil´s Wall, 1879-82) and unfinished Viola (1874-5, 1883-4). Despite his ongoing deafness he continued to compose, and he produced some of his greatest works in the last years of his life. Upon completing his operas Dalibor and Libuše, Smetana began planning for a vast orchestral monument to his nation, the cycle of symphonic poems entitled Má vlast, My fatherland. This cycle of the six, which should be heard as a whole is considered as the crowning achievement of Smetana's life. It includes well known Vyšehrad (1872-4) - respectively a rocky promontory in Prague with mythic associations, Vltava (1874) - a picture of the river that flows through Prague, then Šárka (1875) and Z českých luhů a hájů (From the Fields and Groves of Bohemia, 1875) and last two Tábor (1878) - named after the main seat of the Hussites during the Hussite wars, and Blaník (1879), named for the mountain of legend where the Hussite heros are sleeping, waiting for the moment when they will come to the aid of their country. Smetana also wrote many piano works - polkas (e.g. Three salon polkas, 1848-54), waltzes, and etudes, Fantazie na české národní písně (Fantasia on Czech Folksongs, 1862) or the cycles České tance (Czech Dances, 1877) and Sny (Dreams, 1875). Notable from his chamber music is Z domoviny (From the Homeland, 1880) for violin and piano, or the Piano Trio in g minor (1855), reacting to the death of his daughter. The high-pitched whistling which accompanied his deafness was reenacted in his autobiographical string quartet Z mého života (From My Life, 1876) . The song cycle Večerní písně (Evening Songs, 1879), the choruses Věno (The Dowry, 1880), Modlitba (Prayer, 1880), Tři jezdci (The Three Riders, 1862) or Odrodilec (The Renegade, 1863) represent Smetana´s rich choral work. Smetana spent some of his last years quietly in the country, where he lived with his daughter and second wife. But his mental equilibrium was seriously disturbed, in April 1884 he was taken to the Prague lunatic asylum, where he died on May 12. He was buried in the cemetary at Vysehrad in Prague Smetana is the founder of Czech national music. As regards his style, his origins were in neo-romanticism but the majority of his other compositions were related to the progressive endeavour of the Czech people to recover their liberties. Smetana came to conceive of musical composition as a patriotic mission. He gave his people a new musical identity and self-confidence by his technical assurance and originality in handling national subjects. In his operas and symphonic poems he drew on his country's legends, history and ideas.
    Smetana Museum in Prague, alongside the Vltava River, is a former Neo-Renaissance waterworks that is now a memorial to Smetana. This museum situated at 'Novotneho lavka 1', contains scores, letters and instruments from the composers life and work.

    Links
    www.musicabona.com
    www.hnh.com/composer/smetana.htm
    members.tripod.com/~Nash_K/main.html
    www.bartleby.com/65/sm/Smetana.html


    Biblography
    Z.Nejedlý: Bedřich Smetana: The Great Master (Engl.transl.1924, orig.Prague, 1924)
    B.Karásek: Bedřich Smetana (Ger.and Fr.transl.1967, orig.Prague, 1966)
    C.Thörnqvist: Smetana in Göteborg 1856-1862 (in Engl., Göteborg, 1967)
    B.Large: Smetana (London, 1970)
    J.Clapham: Smetana (London and New York, 1972)


    Discography

    Orchestral

    My Country
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    CD Supraphon

    My Country - Cycle of Symphonic Poems
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    live recording

    4 CD Supraphon

    My Country [Ma vlast]
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon

    My Country [Ma vlast]
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    Prix of Golden Disc of Nippon Columbia

    CD Supraphon

    My Country [Ma vlast]
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek
    Prix of Golden Compact Disc of Nippon Columbia
    Prize of the Art Festival Tokyo

    CD Supraphon

    My Country [Ma vlast]
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Lotos

    My Country [Ma vlast]
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras
    CD Supraphon

    Ma vlast
    Boston Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Ma vlast / My Country
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    Golden Harmony Award 2002

    CD Supraphon

    Richard III - Symphonic Poem, Op. 11, Wallenstein's Camp - Symphonic Poem, Op. 14, Hakon Jarl - Symphonic Poem, Op. 16
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Supraphon

    Vltava (The Moldau)
    Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Daniel Barenboim
    CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Vltava (The Moldau)
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Herbert von Karajan
    CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Vltava (The Moldau)
    Vysehrad
    Berlin Philharmonic, Herbert von Karajan
    CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Vltava, symphonic poem from the cycle My Country [Ma vlast]
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon

    Wallenstein's Camp [Valdstynuv tabor], Symphonic Poem, Op. 14
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Zdenek Macal
    CD MusicVars


    Chamber

    Bagatelles et impromptus, Skizzen [Črty], Op. 4 and 5 (dedicated to Clara Schumann), Reves [Sny], Op. 5
    Petr Jirikovsky - piano
    CD Studio Matous

    Countrywoman Polka (1879), Little Galopp (1832), Galopp di Bravoura (1840), Variations On The Czech Song "Sil jsem proso" (1846), Etude in C Major (1846), Etude in A Minor (1846), Morceau Caracteristique in C flat Major (1847), Caprice in G Minor (1848), Two Marches (1848), Ball-Vision (1858), Concert Etude in C Major (1858), Bettinas Polka - 1st version (1859), Bettinas Polka - 2nd version (1882), Macbeth (1860), Concert Etude "On The Sea-Shore" (1861)
    Ivan Klansky - piano
    CD Kontrapunkt

    Czech Dances (complete recording)
    Emil Leichner - piano
    CD Panton

    From My Homeland - two duos
    Jaroslav Sveceny - violin, Marie Synkova - piano
    CD Musica Pragensis

    From the Homeland - Two pieces for violin and piano
    Pavel Sporcl - violin, Petr Jirikovsky - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Macbeth, Three Salon Polkas, Op. 7, Concert Etude in C major
    Jitka Cechova - piano
    CD Lotos

    Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 15
    Czech Trio (M. Langer - piano, D. Vlachova - violin, M. Petras - cello)
    CD Ultraphon

    Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 15 (1855)
    Gabriela Demeterova - violin, Jan Palenicek - cello, Jitka Cechova - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Polkas Complete
    Petr Jiříkovský - piano
    CD Studio Matous

    String Quartet No. 1 in E minor "From My Life"
    Kapralova Quartet (Rita Cepurcenko - 1st violin, Simona Hurnikova - 2nd violin, Svetlana Jahodova - viola, Margit Klepacova - cello)
    CD MusicVars

    String Quartet No. 1 in E minor "From My Life"
    String Quartet No. 2 in D minor

    Talich Quartet (Jan Talich jr. - 1st violin, Vladimir Bukac - 2nd violin, Jan Talich - viola, Petr Prause - cello)
    CD GZ


    Operas

    Dalibor
    Ivan Kusnjer, Dalibor, Leo Marian Vodicka, Vratislav Kriz, Jiri Kalendovsky, Miroslav Kopp, Eva Urbanova, Jirina Markova, Bohuslav Marsik
    Prague National Theatre Chorus, Milan Maly
    Prague National Theatre Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

    2 CD Supraphon

    Libuše
    Gabriela Benackova, Vaclav Zitek, Antonin Svorc, Leo Marian Vodicka, Karel Prusa, Rene Tucek, Eva Depoltova, Vera Soukupova
    Prague National Theatre Chorus and Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler
    live recording

    3 CD Supraphon

    Libuše
    Eva Urbanova, Vratislav Kriz, Ludek Vele, Jan Markvart, Miloslav Podskalsky, Pavel Cervinka, Helena Kaupova, Miroslava Volkova
    Prague National Theatre Chorus and Orchestra, Oliver Dohnanyi
    live recording

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Bartered Bride
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ančerl
    CD Supraphon

    The Bartered Bride [Prodaná nevěsta]
    L. Cervinkova, B. Blachut, K. Kalas, R. Vonasek etc
    Prague Radio Chorus, Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Karel Ančerl

    2 CD Multisonic

    The Bartered Bride [Prodaná nevěsta]
    Drahomira Tikalova, Ivo Zidek, Eduard Haken, Oldrich Kovar
    Prague National Theatre Chorus and Orchestra, Zdenek Chalabala

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Brandenburgers in Bohemia [Braniboři v Čechách]
    Dagmar Peckova, Ivan Kusnjer, Roman Janal, Valentin Prolat
    The Prague Philharmonia, Jiri Belohlavek

    CD Supraphon

    The Devil's Wall [Čertova stěna]
    Dagmar Peckova - mezzosoprano, Ivan Kusnjer - baritone
    Prague National Theatre Orchestra, Jan Stych

    CD Supraphon

    The Devil's Wall [Čertova stěna]
    Libuše

    Prague National Theatre Orchestra, Zdenek Chalabala (The Devil's Wall), Jaroslav Krombholc (Libuše)
    Milada Subrtova - soprano

    CD Supraphon

    The Kiss [Hubička]
    Eva Depoltova, Leo Marian Vodicka, Eduard Haken, Vaclav Zitek, Libuše Marova, Bozena Effenberkova
    Brno Janacek Opera Chorus and Orchestra, Frantisek Vajnar

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Secret [Tajemstvi]
    Viola - opera (fragment)
    Vaclav Zitek, Vera Soukupova, Daniela Sounova, Leo Marian Vodicka, Jaroslav Horacek, Karel Prusa, Oldrich Spisar, Marie Vesela, Drahomira Drobkova
    Prague National Theatre Chorus and Orchestra, Zdenek Kosler

    2 CD Supraphon

    The Two Widows [Dvě vdovy]
    Marcela Machotkova, Nada Sormova, Jiri Zahradnicek, Jaroslav Horacek, Daniela Sounova, Zdenek Svehla etc
    Prague National Theatre Chorus and Orchestra, Frantisek Jilek

    2 CD Supraphon


    Vocal

    Evening Songs [Večerní písně]
    Beno Blachut - tenor
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Josef Hrncir

    CD Radioservis


  • Sláva VORLOVÁ

    (* 15.3.1894 Náchod - † 24.8.1973 Praha)

    česká skladatelka

    Czech composer

    Nee Miroslava Johnová, Sláva Vorlová grew up in a musical family - her mother was pianist, her father founded a small community orchestra in Náchod. She started her formal studies of music (voice) at the Academy of Music in Vienna, but in 1915 she moved to Prague where she took private music lessons with Václav Štěpán (piano) and Vítězslav Novák (composition). In 1919 she married entrepreneur Rudolf Vorel, and for the next 15 years she had to give up her dream of becoming a composer in order to help her husband build a successful family business. She returned to music in 1933 when she composed her first opus, String Quartet "Bezkydy". The following year Vorlová participated in the masterclasses of Jaroslav Řídký at the Prague Conservatory of Music. Other works soon followed: Three Songs, op. 2, premiered in 1935; Three Songs, op. 4,(1939), premiered in Brussels in 1947; String Quartet 2, op. 5, (1939), premiered in 1941; Fantasy for violoncello and orchestra, op. 6, (1940), premiered in 1945; and White Clouds, op. 8 - a cycle of ten songs for women's choir and orchestra, (1942-43) premiered in 1944. Her patriotic cantata A Little Country, op. 7, that Vorlová composed during the war (1941-42), was premiered in 1948. The same year, Vorlová completed her graduation work, Symphony for Large Orchestra, op. 18, dedicated to Jan Masaryk. The year 1948 also marks the beginnings of Vorlová's collaboration with poet-librettist V.H. Roklan (- a pseudonym of Dr. Vladimír Hloch who was to become Vorlová's life-long companion). The two collaborated on her symphonic poem Songs of Gondwana, op. 19, for soli, mixed choir and orchestra. Other examples of their collaboration include Vorlová's opera-fairy tale Golden Bird, op. 27, (1949-1950), and orchestral suite "Bozena Nemcova," op. 24, (1950-51), premiered in 1952. In 1951 Vorlová also composed Symphonic Overture and popular instructive music Animals in a Piano, op. 26 - twenty-four piano miniatures for children. During the ten years that followed, Vorlová wrote a number of instrumental concertos. During the decade she also composed four symphonic works: Three Bohemian Dances, op. 29, (1952-53), for which she received an award in 1953; Dances from Doudleby, op. 36, (1953-54), another award winning piece (1955); Sarady for two pianos and symphonic orchestra, (1956); and Thuringian Dances, op. 44, (1957).. Other stage works from the period include the composer's one-act opera Two Worlds, op. 45, (1958), We, People of the Twentieth Century, op. 46 - a symphonic ode for children's voices, mixed choir and orchestra, (1959), and New Age Oratorio, op. 49, (1960). In sixties she devised her own method for serial music (7-tone serial music) with which she produced some of her best works. The compositions in styles of dodecaphony, serial and aleatoric music include Dedications, op. 64, (1965); Bhukhar, op. 67, (1965), premiered in 1968 and published in 1970 (Panton); Model Kinetic, op. 69, (1967) or Correlations for bass clarinet, piano and strings, op. 75, (1968), premiered in 1969. She continued writing serial music compositions during the seventies (Spectra, Polarisations, Esoterica, Perspectives). Vorlová died in summer 1973, after a prolonged battle with a terminal illness.

    Biblografie:
    V. H. Roklan: Konfese S. Vorlové (1973)
    Cohen: International Encyclopedia of Women Composers (NY 1981, 2/1987)


  • Václav KUČERA

    (* 29.4.1929 Praha)

    český soudobý skladatel a pedagog


    Czech composer, musicologist and pedagogue

    Václav Kučera studied musicology, aesthetics, philology musicology, aesthetics, philology at the Charles University in Prague (1948-51) and composition with Vissarion Shebalin and musicology with L.A.Maazel, V.A.Zuckerman, N.V.Tumanina in Moscow at theTchaikovski Conservatoire (1951-56). He graduated with the dance drama The Brigands Fire and a dissertation about Leoš Janáček. 1956-59 he worked at Czechoslovak Radio in Prague, 1959-62 he founded and headed the Cabinet for New Music Studies affiliated to the Union of Czechoslovak Composers. 1962-69 he worked as a musicologist in the Institute of Musicology in the Czechoslovak Academy of Sciences. From 1969 to 1983 he was the leading secretary of the Union of Czech Composers and Concert Artists. Since 1972 he has been teaching composition at the Music Faculty of the Academy for Performing Arts in Prague, since 1988 as professor. Since 1997 he is also professor of musicology at the Palacky University in Olomouc. 1978-82 he was member of the Executive Committee of the International Society for Contemporary Music (ISCM), 1988-92 he was president of the International Music Festival Prague Spring, 1992-98 member of the Executive Committee of the European Association of Conservatoires, Académies de Musique et Musikhochschulen (AEC). Kučera's work includes more than 150 titles of music in different genres inclusive electronics. His compositions won a number of distinctions: Obraz (The Tableau) for piano and orchestra the Prize of Queen Marie-José in Geneva (1970), Lidice a special recognition of the Czechoslovak Radio (1970) as well as the Prix d'Italia (1972), the string quartet "Consciousness of Continuities" the Prize of the Union of Czech Composers and Concert Artists (1983), the children chorus "Son tre noti che non dormo" the Trentino International Prize (1994), the mixed chorus "Esta noche" the Premio Municipalidad Gran Canaria (2002) etc. As composer he is interesting in a humanistic theme, tradition of expressive music in combination with searching for new methodology. From the other compositions we can mention: ballet Srdce a sen (Heart and Dream, on his own libretto, 1973), Tableau for Piano and a Large orchestra (1970), Sapporo, a symphonic poem for orchestra and mixed chorus (1991), Concierto imaginativo "Homenaje a Salvador Dalí" for guitar and string orchestra (1994), Criterion, "Hommage a T.S.Eliot", essay for large symphony orchestra (1997), Intimní konverzace (Intimate Conversations, double concertino for bass clarinet, piano and string orchestra,1998), from chamber music i.e.: Panta rhei, music for flute, vibraphone and percussions (1969), Invariant, music for bass clarinet, piano and a stereo tape recorder (1969), Vědomí kontinuity (Consciousness of Continuities, a string quartet to the memory of Vladislav Vančura, 1976), Gogův autoportrét (Gogh´s Self -Portrait, music for bass clarinet and stereo tape, 1985), Slavnosti fantazie (Celebrations of Phantasy, hommage a Max Ernst, a concertante cycle for two guitars, 1991), Metathesis, music for bass clarinet and piano (1998), Mysterious Players, a trio for bass clarinet, violoncello and piano (2000), Imaginace ( a string quartet "Hommage a Edvard Munch". From vocal music: Zpěvy země (Songs of the Earth, a song cycle for baritone and pianoon verses by S.K.Neumann, 1958), Orbis pictus, four painter´s inspirations on composer´s own texts, for mixed choir and ancient musical instruments (1975), Amoroso, a song cycle for mezzosoprano, flute and harp,on words of Old Korean lyrical poetry in Czech and German translations (1975), O Leben, wunderliche Zeit, vier Lieder auf Gedichte von Rainer Maria Rilke für Sopran, Flöte und Klavier (2004). He was also one of pioneer of electro-acoustic music in Czechoslovakia. He composed a Kinetický balet/Labyrint, Pastorale, Spirála (A Kinetic Ballet /Labyrinth, Pastorale, Spiral,1968), Kinechromie, an electrosynthetic composition for afour-channel reproduction (1969), Lidice, a wireless musical-dramatic fresco for a reciter, two reporters,an announcer, solo soprano, mixed chorus, instrumental ensemble and electroacoustic sounds (1972), Spartacus, a quadrophonic musical relief for male, female and mixed choirs, trumpet, percussion instruments and electroacoustic sound objects (1976) and others. Kučera's works have been published by Supraphon, Panton, Peters, Ricordi, Bärenreiter, Moeck, Deutscher Verlag für Musik, Billaudot, Editio Moravia, Intersound and other publishers. As musicologist, Kučera published books "M.P.Mussorgsky - Music of Life" (Prague, 1959), "Talent, Mastery, World Outlook" about beginnings of soviet music avantgarde (Prague, 1962), "New trends in Soviet Music" about dissent-composers in the Soviet Union (Prague, 1967), a number of scientific studies, public lectures, radio and TV music-educational programmes etc.

    with using of the text of www.musica.cz

    Links:
    http://www.musica.cz


  • Milada ŠUBRTOVÁ

    (* 24.5.1924 Lhota u Kralovic - † 1.8.2011 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán


    Czech soprano

    She studied with the tenor Zdeněk Knittl. In 1958 he absolved a course with baritone Apollo Granforte. After second war she started to work in the Great Opera of 5th May in Prague that in the year 1948 was integrated to the National Theatre. She had a splendid performer of Krasava, Jenůfa or Rusalka. Her voice has been very vived. He recorded very often for many publishing houses.

    Recordings - choice

    Milada Šubrtová: Opera recital
    (Arias by Dvorak, Smetana, Ryba, Blodek, Foerster, Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Offenbach, Charpentier, Verdi)
    CD, Supraphon

    Dvořák: Armida - Multisonic

    Antonín Dvořák: Rusalka
    Orchestra and choir of the National Theatre, conductor: Zdeněk Chalabala
    2 CD, Supraphon

    Leoš Janáček: Její pastorkyňa (Jenůfa)
    Orchestra and choir of the National Theatre, conductor: Jaroslav Vogel
    CD, Supraphon

    Bedřich Smetana: Brandenburgers in Bohemia
    Orchestra and choir of the National Theatre, conductor: Jan Hus Tichý
    2 CD, Supraphon


  • Rafael KUBELÍK

    (* 29.6.1914 Býchory - † 11.8.1996 Kastanienbaum)

    český dirigent a skladatel


    Czech conductor, composer and pianist

    Rafael Kubelik studied violin, composition and conducting at the Prague Conservatory. He was also an outstanding pianist, and partner of his famous father, the violin virtuoso Jan Kubelík, on many concert tours. He first conducted the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra in 1934. After Talich left for the National Theatre, Kubelík became chief conductor of Czech Philharmonic. Unwilling to come to terms with the new political situation in the country after 1948, Kubelik emigrated. In 1949 was elected music director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra with which he stayed until 1953. His other engagements included the Covent Garden Opera (1955-1958), the Bavarian Radio Orchestra and the Metropolitan Opera in New York (1972). On 1973, Kubelik obtained Swiss citizenship. He, however, never forgot his homeland and shortly after communistic crash returned to conduct the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra at the memorable concert of mutual understanding in Prague s Old Town Square in 1990. He has since appeared as guest with the orchestra in Prague on several occasions, and conducted Smetana's My Country performed by the Czech Philharmonic in Tokyo for which they won the prize for best concert of the year. He also composed choral works (Kantata beze slov (Cantata without words)), chamber, and orchestral compositions (Orphikon). He also applied himself to opera (Veronika).

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Pavel HAAS

    (* 21.6.1899 Brno - † 17.10.1944 Osvětim)

    český skladatel

    He studied composition at the Brno conservatory in Janáček's master class (1920-22). He worked from 1935 as a private teacher of music theory and after it at the Jewish secondary school in Brno. He was inspired by the style of Janáček, but he developed his own mixed style since his wind Quintet op. 10. He combines Moravian, Jewish, Gregorian chorale, avant-garde and jazz inspiration. He was imprisoned in Terezín concentration camp (1941-44) where he continued to compose (Study for Strings, 1943, Four Songs on Chinese Poetry, 1944, unfinished Symphony 1940-41). He is also an author of opera Šarlatán (Charlatan, 1934-37). He died in a gaz chamber of concentration camp.

    Bibliography:
    L. Peduzzi: O hudbě v Terezínském ghetu, Brno 1999 (About Music in Terezin Ghetto, in Czech only).


  • Jan Dismas ZELENKA

    (* 16.10.1679 Louňovice pod Blaníkem - † 23.12.1745 Drážďany)

    český barokní skladatel

    Bohemian Baroque composer

    His father was the local cantor and an organist and provided him early musical education. Later he studied at the Prague Jesuit College at the Clementimum. The Clementinum was a renowned centre for music and Zelenka maintained the lifelong contact with it. From 1709 he lived in the house of a member of the von Hartig family. Dresden was one of the most significant musical centres of the first half of the 18th century. The Elector of Saxony Friedrich August I converted to Catholicism when he became the King of Poland. As the Dresden population was predominantly Lutheran and no tradition of Catholic church music existed many choristers and instrumentalists were recruited from Bohemia to serve the liturgical requirements of the chapel. Zelenka arrived to Dresden in 1710 or 1711 and became principal double-bass player of the Dresden court orchestra. The years 1716-19 represent a period of study and travel for Zelenka, although details remain unclear. He studied briefly with Lotti in Italy. He accompanied the Electoral Prince to Vienna and during this time he received instruction from the Imperial Kapellmeister Johann Joseph Fux. In Vienna Zelenka was not only expected to improve his compositional skills and absorb the latest musical styles but also to acquire copies of liturgical music to be incorporated into the repertoire of the Dresden Catholic court church. Zelenka made the sizable collection of copies and transcriptions of works written in strict contrapuntal style and he also wrote many compositions himself. When he returned to Dresden he created a collection of vocal compositions a capella for five voices, 18 Cantiones sacrae based upon his study of Palestrina's works. From 1717 J.D.Heinichen was a Kapellmeister in Dresden and after the closure of the Dresden opera in 1720, he concentrated upon liturgical music for the Catholic court church. Throughout the 1720's the music provided for the Catholic court church by Heinichen and Zelenka, who was his assistant and also composed and arranged music for its use, was actively supported by the Electoral Prince and Princess. Zelenka and Heinichen also made alterations to 'imported' sacred music. In 1721-2 Zelenka visited Prague, and in 1723 the Jesuits commissioned Zelenka to compose and direct a music for the Prague celebrations of the coronation of the Emperor Charles VI as King of Bohemia. This performance of a Melodrama De Sancto Wenceslao entitled Sub olea pacis et palma virtutis was a great success. Zelenka assisted Kapellmeister Heinichen to provide the Royal church music for many years, upon Heinechen´s death in 1729 Zelenka assumed his responsibilities for the repertoire of the Catholic court church in full, he composed and directed most of the music himself. It was expected that Zelenka would succeed Heinichen as court Kapellmeister, but Augustus the Strong appointed J.A.Hasse to this position. This event led Zelenka to feel disillusioned by the lack of recognition he had received for his acheivements. In 1733 he addressed to the King a petition which clearly shows his frustration and bitterness. In this letter Zelenka asked for enough money to both eat and to publish his works because he also consistently received a lower salary than other composers at Dresden. In 1733 Friedrich August I died and Zelenka provided the Requiem and 7 Responsoria pro omnibus tribus Nocturnis at very short notice. In 1735 he was appointed as Court church composer. Much of Zelenka's surviving work is in the form of sacred vocal music. He composed over 20 masses - among them his first composition for Dresden Missa Sanctae Caeciliae (1711, rev.about 1712-28), another Mass setting Missa Judica me (1714, rev.about 1720-23), and Missa sanctissimae trinitatis (1736). In 1739 he composed a votive mass upon his recovery from illness Missa Votiva. He wrote Lamentationes Jeremiae prophetae pro hebdomara sancta (1722), three Requiems, two Te Deums, three oratorios, I penitenti al sepolcro (1736), Il serpente di bronzo (1730), Giesu al Calvario (1735), three cantatas, Immisit Dominus (1709), Deus Dux (1716), Attendite et videte (1712), music for a Melodrama de S.Wenceslao, psalms, motets etc. Notable composition is his Miserere (1722/38). Zelenka´s secular works include a set of five Capriccios, composed in Vienna 1717-18, and his celebrated set of six sonatas, 6 Trio Sonatas for two Oboes, Bassoon, and basso continuo (1721-2), Hypocondrie á 7 (1723) or Concerto á 8 concertanti (1723). Zelenka won the admiration of his contemporaries J.S.Bach and G.P.Telemann. Among his composition students were J.J.Quantz, J.G.Harrer and J.G.Röllig Zelenka died of dropsy on the night 22/23 of December 1745. His music exhibits contrapuntal mastery and harmonic imagination. He often used shifts of harmony, or chromaticisms. His music, both instrumental and sacred, is always original and creative. His liturgical works show a concern for the rich musical expression of texts, the last masses and litanies, powerfully expressed his spirituality. His choral works is not similar to those of Bach, they were writing for different religious traditions and idioms. He also made some use of Bohemian folk elements. His compositional output, contrapuntal mastery, extraordinary rhytmic invention, imaginative orchestration, is the real treasure of baroque music.

    Links
    www.baroquemusic.org/bqxzelenka.html
    www.classical.net/music/comp.lst/zelenka.html
    www.musicabona.com


    Biblography
    J.Stockigt: Jan Dismas Zelenka (1679-1745): a Bohemian Musician at the Court of Dresden (Oxford, 2000)

    Discography

    Allegro, Sanctus, Allegro
    Allegro, Gloria, Cum sancto Spiritu
    Et unam sanctam, Allegro

    Anna Hlavenkova - soprano, Magdalena Kozena - mezzosoprano, Lubomir Moravec - counter-tenor, Stanislav Predota, Richard Sporka - tenor, Michael Pospisil - bass
    Jana Brozkova, Vojtech Jouza - oboe, Jan Jouza - violin, Jaroslav Kubita - bassoon, Vaclav Hoskovec - double bass, Frantisek Xaver Thuri - harpsichord
    Musica Florea, Marek Stryncl

    CD Studio Matous

    Concerto in Sol a otto concertanti, ZWV 186
    Capriccios Nos. 1-5, ZWV 182-185, ZWV 190

    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Frantisek Vajnar
    2 CD Panton

    Hipocondria
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Supraphon

    Litaniae de Venerabili Sacramento, Z147
    Regina coeli laetare, Z134
    Salve Regina, mater misericordiae, Z135
    Lactiones (Officium Defunctorum, Z47)
    Invitatorium (Officium Defunctorum, Z47)

    Carolyn Sampson - soprano, Rebecca Outram - soprano, Robin Blaze - countertenor, James Gilchrist - tenor, Michael George - bass, Peter Harvey - bass
    Choir of the King's Consort, Robert King

    CD Hyperion

    Magnificat
    Soloists, Kuhn Mixed Choir, Prague Philharmonic Choir, Prague Chamber Orchestra, Pavel Kuhn
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Lubomir Matl

    CD Supraphon

    Missa Sanctissimae Trinitatis in A minor, ZWV 17
    Anna Hlavenkova - soprano, Magdalena Kozena, Lubomir Moravec - alto, Richard Sporka, Stanislav Predota - tenor, Michael Pospisil - bass
    Musica Florea, Marek Stryncl

    CD Studio Matous

    Missa in D, ZWV 13
    Responsoria pro Hebdomada Sancta, ZWV 55 (selection)
    Sub tuum praesidium, ZWV 157 No. 3

    Missa in D - Jana Jonasova - soprano, Marie Mrazova - alto, Vladimir Dolezal - tenor, Petr Mikulas - bass, Frantisek Xaver Thuri - harpsichord continuo, Jaroslav Tvrzsky - organ continuo, Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    Responsoria, Sub tuum - Jaroslav Tvrzsky - organ, Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Lubomir Matl

    CD Supraphon

    Requiem in D minor, ZWV 48
    Miserere in C minor, ZWV 57

    Soloists, Czech chamber Choir
    Ensemble Baroque 1994, Roman Valek

    CD Supraphon

    Sonata II in G minor
    Ars instrumentalis pragensis (Ivan Sequardt, Libena Sequardtova - oboes, Lubos Hucek - bassoon, Josef Ksica - harpsichord, positive organ)
    and guests (Petr Hejny - viola da gamba, Petr Nejtek - double-bass)

    CD Multisonic

    Sonata No. 1 in F major for two oboes, bassoon and basso continuo
    Sonata No. 2 in G minor for two oboes, bassoon and basso continuo
    Sonata No. 3 in B flat major for violin, oboe, bassoon and basso continuo
    Sonata No. 4 in G minor for two oboes, bassoon and basso continuo
    Sonata No. 5 in F major for two oboes, bassoon and basso continuo
    Sonata No. 6 in C minor for two oboes, bassoon and basso continuo

    Heinz Holliger - oboe, Maurice Bourgue - oboe, Thomas Zehetmair - violin, Klaus Thunemann - bassoon, Klaus Stoll - double bass, Jonathan Rubin - lute, Christiane Jaccottet - harpsichord
    2 CD ECM

    Trio Sonatas 1 - 3, ZWV 181
    Jana Brozkova, Vojtech Jouza - oboe, Jan Jouza - violin, Jaroslav Kubita - bassoon, Vaclav Hoskovec - double bass, F. X. Thuri - harpsichord
    CD Studio Matous

    Sonata No. 4 in G minor
    Sonata No. 5 in F major
    Sonata No. 6 in C minor

    Jana Brozkova, Vojtech Jouza - oboe, Jaroslav Kubita - bassoon, Vaclav Hoskovec - double bass, F. X. Thuri - harpsichord
    CD Studio Matous

    Sonata for Violin, Oboe, Bassoon and Harpsichord No. 3
    Recordare, Domine, testamenti tui
    Kyrie eleison in A minor from the "Litaniae omnium sanctorum"
    Ipocondria - Overture for Orchestra
    Exurge, providentia - Aria for the Widsom from the festive play "Sub olea pacis et palma virtutis"
    In exitu Israel - Motet for Solo Voices, Choir and Orchestra

    Soloists, Kuhn Mixed Chorus
    Musici de Praga, Frantisek Vajnar / Ivan Parik

    CD Panton

    Sub olea pacis et palma virtutis conspicua orbi regia Bohemiae Corona
    Noemi Kiss, Anna Hlavenkova - sopranos, Markus Forster - countertenor, Jaroslav Brezina - tenor, Adam Zdunikowski - tenor, Ales Prochazka - bass
    Musica Florea, Marek Stryncl
    Musica Aetrna, Peter Zajicek
    Ensemble Philidor, Eric Baude-Delhommais
    Boni Pueri - Czech Boy's Choir, Pavel Horak
    conductor - Marek Stryncl
    World premiere recording

    2 CD Supraphon


  • Jan KAPR

    (* 12.3.1914 Praha - † 29.4.1988 Praha)

    český skladatel, režisér, redaktor a publicista

    He graduated at the Prague Conservatory and master class with professors Jarolav Řídký and Jaroslav Křička. After graduation he worked as a music producer of Radio Prague. In 1950-52 he was the chief editor of the publishing house Orbis, in 1961-70 he taught composition at Janáček Academy of Performing Arts. Milan Slavický or Evžen Zámečník was among his pupils. He is an author of 10 symphonies, his 8th Symphony "Campanae Pragenses" (1971, 77) have a world premiere in EBU.

    In 60th he started to be interested in avant-garde composition techniques, especially in the colour. He started to investigate the articulatory possibilities of the human voice or various instruments (Oscillation, 1966, Exercices for Gydli, 1967, Rotation 9, 1967, a.o.), he combined the electronic with acoustic sounds (Ciphres for piano, percussion and electronic sounds, 1966). Kapr's work of last decades has become an internationally known.

    He is also an author of theoretical essays and the book Konstanty (Constants, 1967).

    Bibliography:
    J. Bártová: Jan Kapr: nástin života a díla (Brno, 1994)

    Links:
    www.musica.cz


  • Jaroslav KRČEK

    (* 22.4.1939 Čtyři Dvory u Českých Budějovic)

    český soudobý skladatel a instrumentalista


    Czech contemporary composer, conductor and multi-instrumentalist

    He studied at the Conservatory in Prague as a pupil of Miloslav Kabeláč in composition and Bohumír Liška in conducting. Jaroslav Krček started his career as music editor of the Czechoslovak Radio Studio in Pilsen, later in the Supraphon publishing house. Since the year 1973 he has devoted himself to composing and performing, especially in ensembles Chorea bohemica (1967) and Musica bohemica (1975) that he founded. They were ensembles concentrated to the performing of Czech folklore in arrangement by J. Krček. J. Krček is known as a specialist in heuristic of oldest musical sources. He is also instrument-maker; he devoted himself also to the reconstruction of older folklore instruments. He used them in arrangement or in his own compositions. He received many prizes for these activities (Prix de musique folklorique, Award of Czech Music Council). He cooperate with other ensemble i.e. Capella Istropolitana, he works as a conductor of many ensembles of new music. As a pupil of Miloslav Kabeláč he evolved his own personal style of composing. He is an author of four symphonies, three concertos, many cantatas and melodramas (i.e. O lux mundi for tenor, female choir and two chamber ensembles to the words by J. A. Komenský, 1985, Czech Mass for soli, choir and chamber orchestra, 1991), vocal compositions or music-dramatic compositions: i. e. Nevěstka Raab (Rab the Harlot, 1971), an electronic opera on a libretto by Zdeněk Barborka, where he used an artificial speech.

    Links:
    http://www.musica.cz


  • Michal KOŠUT

    (* 7.6.1954 Brno)

    český soudobý skladatel


    Czech contemporary composer and pedagogue

    He studied at Janáček Academy of Performing Arts in Brno with Ctirad Kohoutek. Already during his studies he created attractive compositions: i.e. Swanova píseň (Swan Song for oboe and piano, 1974), Let vodník ptáků (The Flights of Water Birds for string orchestra, organ and percussion, 1974) or violin composition Pták Phoenix (Bird Phoenix, 1975). He taught at the Music and Dance School and at the Pedagogic Faculty of Brno University. Košut is interesting in plastic arts, literature and history. He wrote the i.e. t a cycle for piano Svět Jana Zrzavého (the World of Jan Zrzavý,1979) or successful symphonic composition Jan Santini Aichel (1979), a musical apotheosis of the great baroque architect. He also composes for electronic media: The Cathedral of Coventry (1984), opera Valérie (1991), television ballet Mimikry (Mimicries, 1992) or opera Ifigénie (1996, premiered in Brno 2001). He composes also music for film.

    Links:
    http://www.musica.cz


  • Jan Křtitel VAŇHAL

    (* 12.5.1739 Nechanice - † 20.8.1813 Vídeň)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer and music teacher

    His signature Johann Baptist Wanhal resulted to mistake that the composer had a Dutch origin. He was appointed organist at Opočno in 1752, after a choirmaster at Nemyčeves by Jičín. 1961 he moved to Vienna. After studying with Dittersdorf, Vaňhal soon made a reputation as composer and teacher. 1761-63 he lived and worked in Italy thanks to support by Baron Riech. In Roma he composed inspired by the music of Gluck and Gassmann his opera Il trionfo di Clelia (1761) and Il Demofonte. Both these operas didn´t preserved. About 1763 he returned to Vienna where he came forward also as a composer of symphonies (3 symphonies op. 10, 1767) and pedagogue. He is an author of more that 100 symphonies, 100 string quartets, piano sonatas and sonatinas, organ fugues. Favorite concert is his Concert in C for Viola and Orchestra, Concert for DoubleBbass, Concert F Major for Organ and Flute Concerto I. From the mass compositions there were especially 20 masses, Stabat Mater, 2 Requiems.


  • Eva OLMEROVÁ

    (* 21.1.1934 Praha - † 10.8.1993 Praha)

    česká jazzová zpěvačka


    Czech jazz singer

    She started with A. Kafka Orchestra and with Prague Dixieland. After she continued in the popular theatre Semafor where she performed in the stages Zuzana, Six Women of Henry VIII. He sang in them the songs Láska nebeská (Celestial Love), Blues samotářky (Blues of Solitary) and other songs composed by J. Suchý and J. Šlitr. In 1966 she was awarded in the inquiry of popularity Czech Nightingale. She was inspired by jazz. At the beginning of 70th she recorded two albums with gospels and evergreens. The second of them called Eva Olmerová (1969-72) was produced for export, but it was, due to political reasons, withdrawed from the Czech market. Only at the beginning of 80th she returned to the scene. She recorded album Zahraj i pro mne (Play for Me too, 1981), which for the half of all songs were written by young composer Michal Kocáb. In 1983 she recorded albums: Čekej tiše (Wait Quietly), Vítr je rváč (Wind is an Agressor), later the album Dvojčata (Twin, 1987). He performed in the clubs Parnas, Metro, Reduta, especially with the Metropolitan Jazz Band. She solved her life problems with alcohol and drugs. Not after 1989 she wasn't appropriately appreciated.


  • Jan VIČAR

    (* 5.5.1949 Olomouc)

    český skladatel a muzikolog

    Czech contemporary composer and musicologist

    He studied at the Conservatory in Olomouc (accordion and clarinet), 1967-72 he continued at the Philosophical Faculty of Palacký University in Olomouc. In 1973 he started teaching at the Department of Musicology and Music Education ibidem, in 1980 also in the Academy of Music and Performing Arts in Prague. He continued with his studies (PhDr. in 1974, CSc. in 1985, associate professor in 1988 and 1995, professor of the theory and history of music in 1998). He was engaged in the re-establishment of the musicology program at the Palacký University since 1990. His publications include the following books: The Accordion and its Musical Use (Prague 1981), Václav Trojan (Prague 1989), Music Criticism and Popularization of Music (Prague 1997), Musical Aesthetics (Prague 1998, co-author R. Dykast). Selected compositions: Music for Strings and Timpani (1980), symphonic picture Way to the Sun (1980), cantata for baritone, mixed chorus and orchestra Cry (1981), The Night Prayer for voice, ob., cl., fag. and piano to the ancient Babylonian text (1996) and others.


  • Václav MÁCHA

    (* 1.1.1979 Praha)

    český klavírista


  • Iva KRAMPEROVÁ

    (* 1.1.1984 celá Česká republika)

    česká houslistka


  • Julie SVĚCENÁ

    (* 4.4.1994 Brandýs nad Labem-Stará Boleslav)

    česká houslistka


  • Otakar ŠEVČÍK

    (* 22.3.1852 Horažďovice - † 18.1.1934 Písek)

    český houslový pedagog


    Czech violinist and pedagogue

    He studied singing, playing piano and violin. He absolved the Prague Conservatory with violinist Antonín Bennewitz. He became a violin-virtuoso and absolved many tours to Poland, Russia. In 1870-73 he worked as a concertmaster of Mozarteum in Salzburg, in 1873 in the Temporary Theatre in Prague, 1873-74 in the Comic Opera in Vienna. In 1875-92 he taught in Charkov and Kiev in Ukraine. In 1892-1906 he worked at the Prague Conservatory, 1909-18 he headed the master-class in Academy of Vienna, in 1919-21 he was a head of violin master-class at the Prague Conservatory. From 1907 he lived in Písek, but he has many private disciples around the world (e.g. Jan Kubelík, Jaroslav Kocian or Ševčík Quartet). He wrote many pedagogical books: School of Violin Technique, School of String Technique. He composed also one composition: Czech Dances including popular "song" Holka modrooká (The Blue-eyed Girl).


  • Oskar NEDBAL

    (* 26.3.1874 Tábor - † 24.12.1930 Záhřeb)

    zakladatel české baletní pantomimy a české operety, první český dirigent světového významu


    Czech composer, conductor and violist

    He studied the violin with Endler in Tábor, from 1885-92 with Bennewitz at the Prague Conservatory. There he also studied the trumpet and the percussion with Bláha and the composition with Antonín Dvořák. He played the viola in the famous Czech Quartet from 1891 to 1906 in which other excellent Dvořák´s pupil composer Josef Suk was the second violinist. Oskar Nedbal was very successful as a conductor. In 1896-1906 he conducted newly founded Czech Philharmonic Orchestra. He worked as a guest conductor all over Europe. He founded and conducted the Tonkünstlerorchester (1907-18) in Vienna. He returned to Prague after the formation of Czechoslovakia, from 1920-21 he conducted Šak Philharmonic Orchestra. He escaped from nationalistic atmosphere unfriendly towards himself to Bratislava. He worked as a head of opera at the newly established Slovak National Theatre, as a director of the Bratislava radio station and as a reader at the university and the music academy. Nedbal was one of the most talented pupils of Antonín Dvořák but as a composer he focused on the "lighter muse". He rather understood composing as entertainment and relaxation from his intensive conducting activity. He composed many famous ballet-pantomimes and operettas which are written to Viennese librettos and in the fashion of Vienna and Berlin. They are works of fresh melody, musical invention, and colourful instrumentation. He made use fresh rhythms of Czech, Polish and Yugoslav folkdance. His well-known ballets are Pohádka o Honzovi (Tale of Honza, 1902), Z pohádky do pohádky (From Fairy Tale to Fairy Tale, 1908), Princezna Hyacinta (Princess Hyacinth, 1911), and Des Teufels Grossmutter (Devil´s Grandmother, 1912). From his operettas are Die keusche Barbara (Chaste Barbara, Vienna, 1911), Polenblut (Polish Blood, Polská krev in Czech, Vienna 1913), Die Winzerbraut (The Vineyard Bride, Vinobraní in Czech, Vienna, 1916), Die schöne Saskia (Vienna, 1917), Eriwan (Vienna, 1918) or Donna Gloria (Vienna, 1925). He wrote one opera Sedlák Jakub (Peasant Jacob, Brno 1922), Scherzo caprice (1892) for orchestra, and few piano works - Lettres intimes, 4 Pieces, Pohádka o smutku a štěstí (Fairy Tale about Grief and Joy, 1906). He died in Zagreb where he committed suicide by jumping from a window of the Opera House on December 24th 1930.

    Links http://www.divadlotabor.cz


    Biblography
    A. Buchner: Oskar Nedbal: život a dílo (Life and works) (Prague, 1976)
    J.M.Květ: Oskar Nedbal (Prague, 1947)
    A. Bauer: Opern und Operetten in Wien (Graz and Cologne, 1955)
    K.Junk: Handbuch des Tanzes (Stuttgart, 1930)
    V. Reittererová: O. Nedbal a Vídeň (Prague, 2005)


    Discography

    Polenblut (Polská krev)
    Iveta Dufkova - singing (1-15), Robert Sicho (3, 7, 11, 14)
    Vaclav Hybs and his orchestra

    1 CD Multisonic

    Valse Triste
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    1 CD Supraphon

    Valse triste
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Zdenek Macal
    1 CD MusicVars

    Valse triste from the ballet "The Tale of Simple Johnny"
    (Famous Czech Miniatures)

    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek
    Recorded in 1973

    1 CD Supraphon


  • Pavel KOPECKÝ

    (* 4.4.1949 Praha)

    český soudobý skladatel a pedagog


    Czech contemporary composer and teacher

    He began to study piano and cello. After graduating at the Electro-Technical Secondary School he worked as a sound engineer in Czech Television. 1972-77 he studied Prague Academy of Performing Arts (composition, piano and music pedagogy). He absolved the Summer Courses in Siena with F. Donatoni. He absolved with Concert for piano and orchestra. After, he was granted a post-gradual scholarship for two years at the State Conservatory in Moscow under prof. N. Sidelnikov. He worked as a pedagogue in the Department of Music and Sound at the Academy of Perfoming Arts in Prague at the Film and TV Faculty. Already his first compositions were awarded in many competitions. Among other works we can remember: 1st and 2nd Sonatas for Piano (1975, 1978), Sfingy (Sfings, phantasy for organ,1976), Čtyři symfonická preludia Moskevská (Four Symphonical Preludia, 1979), Bláznovy zápisky (Madmans Notes, piano suite on the story by N. V. Gogol, 1980), Piano Trio (1981). From the electro-acoustic compositions with acoustic instruments: Synthesis for piano and EA, Reberberation for cello and EA, Zátiší s harlekýnem (Still life with Harlequin for cello and EA), Zátiší s pierotem (Still life with Pierrot for piano and EA). To the pure electroacoustic compositions we can assign Zátiší s kolombínou (Still life with Colombine for synthesizer and EA), Noc trifidů (Night of Triffids), Defilé, Via regia, Netrpělivý Orfeus (Impetian Orfeus). Kopecký is also author of concert or ballets (Luci serene) or music to the film documents.

    Links:
    http://mujweb.cz/kultura/kopecky


  • František Xaver RICHTER

    (* 1.12.1709 Holešov - † 12.9.1789 Štrasburk)

    skladatel, houslista, jeden z hlavních představitelů ranného hudebního klasicismu

    Bohemian composer, Kapellmeister and singer

    Very little is known about his youth. He received a musical education possibly under Fux's personal supervision in Vienna. He also spent some time in Italy. In 1736 Richter entered to the Stuttgart Hofkapelle as a bass singer. In 1737 he became director of music at the Benedictine Ritterakademie in Ettal. In 1740 he was appointed vice-Kapellmeister to the Prince-Abbot Anselm von Reichlin-Meldegg in Kempten, Allgäu, later becoming Kapellmeister. Around 1747 Richter joined the Hofkapelle of the Elector Palatine Carl Theodor in Mannheim as a bass. There exists some mentions about Richter as violinist but this is not proved. During 1750´s Richter made tours, first to the Oettingen-Wallerstein court, later to France, England and the Netherlands, and in 1760´s he spent some time in Bonn. Around 1768 he was appointed a court chamber composer but he also obtained recognition in Mannheim as a composer of sacred music. In 1769 he succeeded Joseph Gamier as Kapellmeister at Strasbourg Cathedral where he stayed until his death. His performing and composing activities turned increasingly to sacred music. As composer he now devoted himself to church music, though his duties included also the supervision of secular music at the prince-bishop´s court and the direction of the Strasbourg municipal orchestra. Ignace Pleyel was appointed his assistant in 1783 and succeeded him on his death in 1789. Richter was also esteemed as a teacher. Among his most famous pupils were J.M.Kraus, H.J. Riegel, Carl Stamitz, F.X.Pokorny and Ferdinand Fraenzl. Between 1761 and 1767 he wrote a treatise on harmony and composition Harmonische Belehrungen (1760-7). F. X. Richter was one of the leaders, and next to J. V. Stamic one of the most expressive personalities of the Mannheim school, which were so important for the beginnings of the symphonie, and for the evolution of the Classical tonal style. Richter´s compositional style connect the style characteristics of the Baroque with more progressive elements. He adapted the new Mannheim pre-Classical symphonic style with his own differentiated dynamics and instrumentation. Richter wrote a significant number of symphonies for the Mannheim orchestra but he was temperamentally and artistically more interested in the composition of church music. Later he also became displeased with the preoccupation with virtuosity and modishness at Mannheim, which he considered was leading composers to over-rely on stereotyped musical effects. Richter wrote around 70 symphonies, six of them were published in Paris by 1744, that is before his appointment to the Electoral court. He wrote a succession of concertos for harpsichord, flute, oboe, clarino, French horn and violoncello, 6 string quartets, 6 sonatas for hapsichord, violin/flute and violoncello, a second set of 6 sonatas for 2 violins, violoncello and hapsichord. He composed an oratorio for Good Friday La deposizione dalla croce (1748), 34 masses, Requiem, over 60 motets. One of his two Te Deums, is one of the most distinguished Baroque works, and with 12 of his string symphonies was published in Paris in 1744. His psalm setting Super flumina Babylonis (1767-68) received an excellent notice in the Mercure de France.

    Bibliography

    J.Reutter: Studien zur Kirchenmusik Franz Xaver Richters (1709-1789) (Frankfurt, 1993)
    R.Pečman: Franz Xaver Richter und seine "Harmonische Belehrungen", ed.E.Thom (Blankenburg, Harz, 1990)


    Discography

    Sinfonia No. 1 in G major
    Sinfonia No. 2 in C major
    Sinfonia No. 3 in B major
    Sinfonia a Quattro in C minor
    Adagio and Fuga in G minor

    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Prof. Jaroslav Přikryl - harpsichord, Prof. Jaroslav Tůma - organ
    CD SKO

    Symphony in F minor
    Talich Chamber Orchestra, Jan Talich
    Josef Suk - violin, Zuzana Růžičková - harpsichord

    CD Lotos

    Trumpet Concerto in D
    Hĺkan Hardenberger - trumpet, Simon Preston - organ
    The Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, London Philharmonic Orchestra, , I Musici, Sir Neville Marriner, Elgar Howarth

    2 CD Philips

    Trumpet Concerto in D major
    Simon Preston - Organ, Hĺkan Hardenberger - Trumpet, Maurice André - Trumpet
    Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Munich Bach Orchestra, Munich Chamber Orchestra, Hans Stadlmair, Karl Richter, Neville Marriner

    2 CD Deutsche Grammophon

    Concerto in D major for Trumpet, Strings and Harpsichord
    Consonanza di Praga (Vladislav Kozderka - trumpet, Zdenka Pelikanova - 1st violin, Jan Dudek - 2nd violin, Jiri Richter - viola, Vaclav Jirovec - cello, Marie Sestakova - harpsichord)
    CD MusicVars

    Concertos for Flute and Orchestra in E minor, in D major
    Jiří Válek - flute, Josef Hála - harpsichord continuo
    Dvořák Chamber Orchestra, Vladimír Válek

    CD Supraphon


  • Kryštof HARANT of Polžice

    (* 1.1.1564 Klenová - † 21.6.1621 Praha)

    český renesanční skladatel, zpěvák, spisovatel, cestovatel a diplomat

    The day of his birth is exactly unknown. He was studying music of Netherlandish polyphony. His compositions were performed especially at the German courts. The seven pieces survived. He took part in army in the Turkish wars 1593-97. In 1597 he set out with the knight Heřman Černín on a pilgrimage to he Holy Land and Egypt.

    He described his experiences in a book which contains also his six-part motet Qui confidunt in Domino (written 1598 in Jerusalem). After his return to Prague, he became valet to the Emperor Rudolf II. He served him until 1612. In 1615 he was released from his duties and he went at Pecka Castle. He kept here a musical establishment. He was converted in 1618 to neoutraquism. In 1620, he took part in the Bohemian noble revolt. He was arrested and condemned to death, beheaded in the Old Town Square. His work was edited in the book Opera Musica (1956).

    Bibliography:
    R. Quoika: Christoph Harant von Poschitz und seine Zeit, in Musikforschung, pp. 414-429.


  • Josef SUK starší

    (* 4.1.1874 Křečovice - † 29.5.1935 Benešov)

    český hudební skladatel a pedagog, člen Českého kvarteta

    (Prague, 1956, 2/1962, Engl., Ger., Fr. and Russ. transl. 1968)
    J. Doubravová: Sound and Structure in Josef Suk's Zrání - International Review of the Aesthetics and Sociology of Music (1977, 73-87)

    Discography:

    Orchestral

    A Fairy Tale (No. 1 from Raduz a Mahulena, Op. 16)
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Libor Pešek
    CD Supraphon

    A Fairy Tale (from "Raduz and Mahulena") | Four Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 17
    Ivana Tomaskova - violin, Renata Ardasevova - piano
    CD Multisonic

    A Fairy Tale No. 1 from Raduz and Mahulena | Towards a New Life (Festival March)
    Ivan Zenaty - violin (A Fairy Tale)
    Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, Bohumil Kulinsky / Vaclav Smetacek (Humoresque)

    CD Multisonic

    A Fairy Tale, Op. 16 | Suite from Raduz and Mahulena
    Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, Bohumil Kulinsky
    CD Multisonic

    A Fairy-tale | Suite, Op. 16 | Praga, Symphonic Poem for Large Orchestra, Op. 26
    Petr Skvor - violin (in Fairy-tale)  
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Supraphon

    A Summer Tale, Tone Poem for Large Orchestra, Op. 29  
    Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale "St. Wenceslas" for String Orchestra, Op. 35a
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Sejna
    CD Supraphon

    Asrael
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon

    Asrael
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    2 CD Supraphon

    Asrael (Symphony for Orchestra), Op. 27
    Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Panton

    Fantasia in G minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 24 (1902)
    Josef Suk - violin  
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl  
    Golden Harmony Award 2002

    CD Supraphon

    Fantasic Scherzo for Orchestra, Op. 25
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon

    Fantasy in G minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 24
    Ivan Zenaty - violin  
    Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, Bohumil Kulinsky
    CD Multisonic

    Fantasy in G minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 24
    Gabriela Demeterova - violin  
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Supraphon

    Jaro / Springtime, Op. 22a (1902), Pohádka léta / Summertime Tale, Op. 29 (1907-1909)
    Czechoslovak Radio Prague Orchestra, Josef Hrncir
    CD Český rozhlas

    Love Song, Op. 7 No. 1, Serenade in E flat Major
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek - 1973 (Love Song)  
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Josef Vlach - 1962 (Serenade)

    CD Supraphon

    Meditation on the Old Bohemian Chorale "St. Wenceslas", Op. 35a
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD SKO

    Meditation on the Old Czech Choral "St. Wenceslas", Op. 35
    Czech Chamber Orchestra, Ondrej Kukal
    CD Waldmann

    Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale "St. Wenceslas" for String Orchestra, Op. 35a
    Legend of the Dead Victors, Commemoration for Large Orchestra, Op. 35b
    Towards a New Life, Festive Sokol March, Op. 35c

    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Supraphon

    Praga, Dramatic Overture, Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale Saint Wenceslas  
    Legend of Dead Victors, Towards a New Life
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Petr Altrichter
    CD Supraphon

    Praga, Op. 26, Symphonic Poem, A Fairy Tale [Pohadka], Op. 16, Suite for Orchestra
    Nordwestdeutsche Philharmonie, Alun Francis
    CD CPO

    Ripening, Symphonic Poem
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Karel Ancerl  
    Live recording (1963, 1964)
    CD Multisonic

    Serenade for String Orchestra, Asrael, Ripening, A Fairy-tale
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    13 CD Supraphon

    Serenade for String Orchestra in E flat major, Op. 6
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD Supraphon

    Serenade for String Orchestra in E flat major, Op. 6
    Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon

    Serenade in E flat major for String Orchestra, Op. 6,  Love Song [Píseň lásky], Op. 7 No. 1
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Libor Pesek (Serenade)  
    Gabriela Demeterova - violin, Collegium of Czech Philharmonic, Jan Chalupecky (Love Song)

    CD Supraphon

    Symphony in E major, Op. 14
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon

    Towards a New Life
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon

    Towards a New Life, Op. 35c (ceremonial march)
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Zdenek Macal
    CD MusicVars

    Chamber

    Bagatelle, Village Serenade, Love Song
    Josef Suk - violin, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Lotos

    Elegy (under the impression of Zeyer's Vysehrad), Op. 23
    Academia Trio (Jaroslav Matejka - cello, Pavel Safarik - violin, Petr Jirikovsky - piano)
    CD MusicVars

    Evening Mood from Summer Moods for piano, Lullaby [Ukolébavka]
    Josef Suk - violin, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Fantasy-Polonaise op. 5 [Fantazie-Poloneza], Humoresque in C major [Humoreska C dur], Moods op. 10 [Nalady], Piano Pieces op. 12 [Klavirni skladby], Village Serenade [Vesnicka serenada]
    Pavel Stepan - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Four Pieces for Violin and Piano
    Ballad for Violin and Piano, for Cello and Piano, for String Quartet a. o.

    Josef Suk - violin, Marek Jarie - cello, Josef Hala - piano, Jan Panenka - piano, Ivan Klansky - piano etc.  
    Suk Quartet

    CD Supraphon

    Four Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 17
    J. Novakova - violin, J. Hala - piano
    CD Panton

    Four Pieces for Violin and Piano, Op. 17
    Pavel Sporcl - violin, Michal Rezek - piano
    CD Clarton

    Four Pieces, Op. 17 for violin & piano
    Louis Persinger - piano, Ruggiero Ricci - violin, Ernest Lush - piano
    2 CD Decca

    Jaro/Spring, Op. 22a, Píseň lásky/Love Song, Op. 7, No. 1, Idylky/Small Idylls, Op. 7, No. 4
    Igor Ardasev - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Life and Dream, Op. 30, Lullabies, Op. 33, Episodes
    Pavel Stepan - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Love Song, Op. 7 No. 1, Humoresque, Op. 7 No. 2, Mother, Op. 28
    Ivan Moravec - piano
    CD Supraphon

    Love Song, Op. 7, No. 1
    Josef Suk - violin, Josef Hala - piano, Ales Barta - organ
    CD Lotos

    Love Song, Op. 7, No. 1
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek
    CD Supraphon

    Love Song, Op. 7, No. 1, Village Serenade, An Album Leaf, Bagatelle, Violin solo from the fairy-tale Raduz a Mahulena, Melody, Evening Mood
    Josef Suk - violin, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Lotos

    Meditation on the Ancient, Czech Chorale, "St. Venceslaw" Op. 35a
    New Vlach Quartet (Jana Vlachova - 1st violin, Ondrej Kukal - 2nd violin, Petr Verner - viola, Mikael Ericsson - violoncello)
    CD MusicVars

    Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale "Saint Wenceslas", Op. 35
    Janacek String Quartet (Jiri Novotny - violin, Vitezslav Zavadilik - violin, Ladislav Kyselak - viola, Bretislav Vybiral - cello)
    CD Amabile Melody

    Raduz and Mahulena
    Josef Suk - violin, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Lotos

    Piano Quartet in A minor, Op. 1
    Bohemia Quartet
    CD Panton

    Piano Quartet in A minor, Op. 1
    Kubelik Trio (Shizuka Ishikawa - violin, Karel Fiala - cello, Kvita Bilynska - piano)  
    Josef Suk - violin
    CD GZ

    Piano Quartet in A minor, Op. 1, Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 8
    Jan Simon - piano, Josef Suk, Pavel Sporcl - violins, Karel Untermuller - viola, Jiri Barta - cello
    CD Lotos

    Piano Trio in C minor, Op. 2
    New Prague Trio (Arnost Strizek - piano, Jiri Klika - violin, Jan Zvolanek - cello)
    CD Panton

    String Quartets
    Suk Quartet
    CD Supraphon

    Trio for Piano, Violin and Cello in C minor, Op. 2; Elegy for Piano, Violin and Cello, Op. 23; Quartet for Piano, Violin, Viola and Cello in A minor, Op. 1; Quintet for Piano, 2 Violins, Viola and Cello in G minor, Op. 8
    Suk Trio (Trio, Elegy), Jan Panenka - piano (Quartet), Josef Suk - violin (Quartet), Suk Quartet (Quintet)
    CD Supraphon

    Vocal

    Mass in B flat major
    Marie Matejkova - soprano, Ilona Satylova - alto, Jiri Vinklarek - tenor, Michael Mergl - bass  
    Miluska Kvechova - organ  
    Prague Radio Chorus  
    Plzen Radio Orchestra, Stanislav Bogunia

    2 CD Radioservis

    Ten Songs, Op. 15
    Bambini di Praga  
    L. Cermakova, J. Saroun - piano accompaniment  
    Bohumil Kulinsky

    CD Multisonic


  • Hans KRÁSA

    (* 30.11.1899 Praha - † 18.10.1944 Osvětim)

    český skladatel německo-židovského původu


    Hans Krása was born in Prague in the Czech-German family. He made his first attempts at composing in his childhood, these compositions however have been lost. His teacher in the Prague Conservatory was Alexander Zemlinsky with whom Krása later moved to the newly established Deutsche Akademie fur Musik und darstellende Kunst. He absorbed much of Prague's cultural ambience and life, dominated to a certain extent by the Mahler cult. Of great importance was the work of Vitězslav Novák. Krása's first major compositions were affected by these basic stylistic influences. He spent successful creative time in Paris and Berlin but Prague seemed to be his strongest support and attraction. He was a repetiteur in the New German Theatre in Prague, associating himself with the German intellectuals and with Czech artists, painters in particular. The 1930s witnessed some of Krása's greatest works for voices and orchestra. Because of Krása's antifascist sentiment was interned in the Teresienstadt ghetto, on August 1942. He used a piano score to write a new instrumentation of the opera for children Brundibar, which had as many as 55 performances there. The success scored by the opera stimulated him to further work. In the midst of omnipresent death Krása wrote his String Trio (Tanz), Passacaglis and Fugue, Three songs for soprano, clarinet, viola and cello. On the night of October 16th 1944 Krása was herded into railway wagon and taken away.

    Text: Musica Bona


  • František LÝSEK

    (* 2.5.1904 Proskovice - † 16.1.1977 Brno)

    sbormistr, folklorista a hudební pedagog


    František Lýsek dedicated his life to children's choirs and choral music. He was the founder of modern children's singing in the former Czechoslovakia, and based on his lifelong teaching activities, he developed a didactic conception of children's choirs and musical education in which theory was perfectly integrated into practice. While teaching in Jistebník nad Odrou he formed the Jistebník Little Singers (1929-1938), in Baťov he set up the Baťov Children's Choir (1938-1945), and as a university lecturer in Brno he led the Brno Children's Choir from 1945 to the year of his death in 1977. Professor Lýsek's work lives on in the audio, film and television recordings of his choirs, his academic monographs and studies (particularly Cantus choralis infantium, 1968 and Vox liberorum, 1976), all of which bear witness to his immense contribution to Czech culture. He also left a living legacy in the form of the eleven thousand children who sung in his choirs, the hundreds of teachers who were his students at Brno University's Department of Musical Education, and many others who were influenced by his ideas of musical education at numerous seminars both in Czechoslovakia and abroad. Nowadays we can see a renewed relevance in Lýsek's lifelong quest to make music, in the sense of active musical participation, accessible to everybody, especially children. He believed that "all good things begin their development in childhood". František Lýsek was also a diligent collector of folk songs and dances from the region of Lachia. He recorded over 1250 of these melodies, which are now the property of the Brno Institute for Ethnography and Folklore Studies and are regularly brought to life by Ondřejnica, a group of Lachian folk musicians founded in 1977. Out of the numerous a capella arrangements of folk songs from Bohemia and Moravia, Lýsek gradually compiled two collections which were published by the Brno-based Pazdírek company with the titles Forget-Me-Nots (1937) and Dandelions (1941). After the war, both collections were re-published as part of the Melpa series, by Melantrich of Prague and Pazdírek of Brno, in 1945 and 1947. In 1950 a third collection, Daisies, was added to the first two, published by the Czechoslovak Composers' Association. This collection contains arrangements of folk songs which Lýsek selected from Ludvík Kuba's collections The Slavic World in Song. Due to the fact that Lýsek's collections have long been sold out in the shops, and in the light of continuing interest from choirmasters, the František Lýsek Foundation has published this collection of the most popular of Lýsek's arrangements for children's choirs. Many of the songs have earned a firm place in the core repertoire of school choirs and beginner's choirs.

    Links
    http://www.musicologica.cz/slovnik
    http://www.nadace.sky.cz


  • Miloš ŠAFRÁNEK

    (* 23.1.1894 Lechovice - † 28.4.1982 Praha)

    český hudební spisovatel, autor monografie o B. Martinů


    Czech music writer and publicist

    He studied at the Philosophical Faculty, from 1919 he worked at the Ministry of Foreign Affaires. In the years 1927-38 he worked as a diplomat in Paris where he promoted Czech music. He aided to Martinů make it in U.S.A., where he spent more years between 1939-45. In 1946 he returned to Prague. He participated in the establishing of the Theatre of Music in Prague. As a close friend of Martinů he wrote about him many articles and books: i.e. Bohuslav Martinů - The Man and his Music, 1944; Bohuslav Martinů - Život a dílo, 1961 (Life and Work) and he edited his literary heritage in the book Bohuslav Martinů - Domov, hudba a svět (Home, Music and World, 1966).


  • Rudolf PISKÁČEK

    (* 15.3.1884 Praha - † 24.10.1940 Praha)

    zakladatel české lidové operety

    Czech composer and conductor

    He studied composition and the organ et the Prague Conservatory 1903-06. His Violin Sonata A minor was awarded first prize of the Czech Academy of Arts and Sciences. His main job was the composing of operetta and conducting (in Aréna, Vinohrady Theatre, Akropolis in Prague, in 1925-26 also in České Budějovice. Of his 40 operettas those that have been most performed are Slovácká princezka (1917), Tulák (The Tramp, 1924) and Perly panny Serafínky (Miss Serafinka´s Pearls, 1928). Many of his compositions are inspired by Czech and Moravian folksongs (Fantasia for piano, Slovácká princezka, many male chorus). Piskáček´s brother Adolf was a composer and choirmaster.


  • Lukáš KLÁNSKÝ

    (* 22.3.1989 Praha)

    český klavírista


  • Ivo KAHÁNEK

    (* 23.5.1979 Frýdek-Místek)

    český klavírista


  • Libor NOVÁČEK

    (* 1.1.1979 Praha)

    český klavírista


  • Libor SUCHÝ

    (* 22.11.1994 Praha)

    český klarinetista


  • Josef PÁLENÍČEK

    (* 19.7.1914 Travnik - † 7.3.1991 Praha)

    český klavírista a skladatel

    Czech pianist and composer


  • Jan Václav TOMÁŠEK

    (* 17.4.1774 Skuteč - † 3.4.1850 Praha)

    český skladatel, klavírista a pedagog

    Bohemian pianist, composer and teacher

    V. J. K. Tomášek was an influential teacher and pianist, and in 1824 he opened his own music institute in Prague. He educated a number of outstanding pianists and composers, such as J. Voříšek, A. Dreyschock, and E. Hanslick. He soon became a leading personality on the Prague music scene. As a composer, he left behind a great number of valuable symphonic (Symphony in D major) and concerto works (Piano concerto in C major), as well as remarkable religious music (Missa solemnis in C major, Requiem in C minor, Te deum). He also tried his hand at composing musical plays and operas, but he mainly concentrated on piano pieces and solos. It is the songs with German lyrics by J. W. Goethe that represent his independent path towards romantic chamber airs. The ideas behind Tomášek's style are rooted in Classicism, but in many ways they presaged the birth of romanticism. In this regard, his short piano compositions are of great importance, as in them he preceded the greatest masters of this genre, Voříšek, Schubert, and Chopin.

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Emil František BURIAN

    (* 11.6.1904 Plzeň - † 9.8.1959 Praha)

    český skladatel, dirigent, představitel české hudební avantgardy

    His father, Emil Burian, and his uncle Karel Burian were outstanding singers. He studied composition by J. B. Foerster.

    He was director in the Prague avant-garde theatre, dramatist and actor for the Modern studio and the Artistic Society (1923), actor and musician in Voskovec and Werich's theatre Na slupi (1925) and in the Dada Theatre (1927). In 1924 he founded Přítomnost (Presence), society for contemporary music. In 1927 he founded the voice band, successful at the ISCM Festival and on an Italian tour in 1928. In 1929-32 he worked as a director in Brno, then in Olomouc. Back in Prague he worked for the cabaret Červené eso as a jazz band leader, soloist, composer. In 1933 he established his own theatre of D34. During the war, the theatre was closed and Burian was sent to a concentration camp. After the war, he worked as a director of D34, in Brno and Karlín Prague.

    He began to compose in a last romantic style (i. e. opera Před slunce východemBefore Sunrise, 1924), after he was influenced by les Six and jazz (i.e. ballet Fagor a flétnuThe Basson adh the Flute, 1925). He also has an interest in folk and urban music (i.e. folk play with songs and dances VojnaThe War, 1935) influenced by Janáček and Stravinskij. The most interesting work for the voice band was Máj (May 1936, text by K. H. Mácha). His opera Maryša (1938) was a naturalist opera. His best works have been composed in the period of avant-garde.

    Selected bibliography:
    B. Srba: "Poetické divadlo E. F. Buriana" (The poetic theatre of E. F. Burian), Prague 1971.
    J. Kladiva: "E. F. Burian", Praha 1982
    H. Valentová: "Bubu z Montparnasu, lyrická opera E. F. Buriana", in: Opus musicum N. 1, 1995, pp. 3-12.


  • Vlastimil HÁLA

    (* 7.7.1924 Souš (Most) - † 29.7.1985 Vysoký Újezd)

    český skladatel a aranžér, autor taneční, filmové a scénické hudby

    He studied business academy, composition privately with J. Rychlík and J. Feld. Shortly, he absolved composition and arrangement of pop music in London. After WWII, he became a member of the group Swing Stars, from the year 1947 to 1964 he was a trumpeter and an arranger of popular Karel Vlach's Orchestra.

    During the year 1964-84 he worked as a music director in Radio. He wrote many theatre and stage musics: My chceme gól (We Want to Score), Sheheresade, Tři pomeranče (Three Oranges), Charleyova teta (Charlie's Aunt) a.o. He became a pioneer of the Czechoslovakian musical: Starci na chmelu (Gray bards Picking the Hops), Čtyři vraždy stačí, drahoušku (Four Murders Are Sufficient, Darling), Šest medvědů s Cibulkou (Six Bears with Cibulka), Zabil jsem Einsteina, pánové (I killed Einstein, Gentlemen), with J. Rychlík he composed the music to Limonádový Joe (Lemonade Joe), with J. Bažant and J. Malásek to the film Dáma na kolejích (Lady on the Rails), with M. Štědroň to the film Balada pro banditu (Ballad for Bandit) or Blues pro E.F.B. (Blues for E.F.B.).

    He composed also many popular songs or orchestral jazz music. He is an author of the book Základy aranžování moderní populární hudby (Basics of Arrangement of Modern Popular Music, 1980).


  • Janáček Philharmonic Orchestra

    (* 22.1.1954 Ostrava)


  • Škroup and Tyl´s Fidlovačka premiere

    (* 21.12.1834 Praha)

    v níž poprvé zazněla píseň Kde domov můj - pozdější součást národní hymny (1834)


  • Bohuslav Matěj ČERNOHORSKÝ

    (* 16.2.1684 Nymburk - † 5.2.1742 Štýrský Hradec/Graz)

    skladatel, varhaník, představitel české barokní hudby

    He became from music family. In 1700-02 he studied philosophy at Prague University, he was an organist of the Týn Church. In 1704 he was admitted to the Fransciscan's order. In 1710-15 he works as a chief organist in the basilica of St. Francesco in Assisi (here he composed i.e. Regina coeli 1712), he received a master´'s degree in theology. He was ostracized for 3 years. In this years he stay and work at Horažďovice convent (he composed here in 1739 his best known work Laudatus Jesus Christus). He returned to Prague in 1730, he worked also in Padua. He died in Graz 1742 during his travel to Prague.

    In his music evolution he was probably influenced by the music theorist and lexicographer J. B. Janovka. German musicologist Kretzschmar titled him "Czech Bach".

    Bibliography:
    K. Šulcová:B. M. Černohorský, biography, diss. University of Brno, 1979
    K. Šulcová:Impulsy studio o hudbě baroka (Spurs to the Study of Baroque Music), Opus musicum 1988, pp. 161-178.


  • PKF - Prague Philharmonia

    (* 17.11.1994 Praha)

    Originally Prague Chamber Philharmonia


  • Rudolf KUBÍN

    (* 10.1.1909 Ostrava - † 11.1.1973 Ostrava)

    český skladatel

    Czech composer, editor and organiser from Silesia

    He was born in the family of folk musician, who from 1912 he became a bandmaster of the cloth factory in Okay and after his return from Russian war internment he became a bassist of German Opera in Ostrava. Little Rudolf played violoncello, in 1924 he started to study Prague Conservatory. In 1925-27 he absolved Hába´s composition courses. In1927 he interrupted his studies for the reason of want of money. In 1929 he was engaged as a violoncellist to the Prague Radio Orchestra, conducted during the time by O. Jeremiáš. 1933-35 Kubín worked as a music editor in Radio Brno, after in Ostrava. In Ostrava region he studied Lachian folklore, after also the songs of miners. In 50th he accepted the ideology of Socialist Realism. He became vice-president of the Association of Czechoslovak composers. Owing to this function, he founded many music organisations in the region (Ostrava Conservatory, Ostrava symphony orchestra, Miner's Art Ensemble). He was composing in many genres from 20th: i.e. symphonical Prolog (Prologue, 1929), Symfonieta for large orchestra and organ (1936), instrumental concerts, cycle of symphonic poems Ostrava (1951-52), symphonic poem Ostravian Variations, many choirs, song cycles. He is also an author of the 1st radio opera Letní noc (Summer Night, 1930-31), opera Naši furianti (Our Loudmouth, 1942-49) four melodramas, socialistic songs or music to films.

    Links:
    http://www.musicologica.cz


  • Tereza STOLZOVÁ

    (* 2.6.1834 Kostelec nad Labem - † 22.8.1902 Milán)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán


    Bohemian soprano

    She was from musical family. Her twin sisters Francesca and Ludmila were also sopranos. Tereza studied at the Prague Conservatory. In 1856 she joined her twins and her husband composer Ricci to Trieste. She made her opra debut in Tbilisi in 1857. For some time after, she sang in Constantinopole, Odessa and again Tbilisi. From the year 1863 she performed at the Italian stages. In 1872 Stolzová was the first Italian Aida (and subsequently in Paris, London and Vienna), she was also the first soprano of the Verdi Requiem. She became the prominent heroine of Verdi´s operas. Her last engagement was in St. Peterburg in 1876-77).


  • Heinrich Ignaz Franz BIBER

    (* 12.8.1644 Stráž pod Ralskem - † 3.5.1704 Salcburk)

    rakouský barokní skladatel a houslista původem z Čech

    He may have studied at a Jesuit Gymnasium at Opava. He was here trained in music. His first known composition is Salve regina for soprano, vln. vla da gamba and org. In the year 1668 he entered the service of Bishop Karl Lichtenstein in Kroměříž, in the year 1669 Biber composed the Sonata violin solo for carnival. In 1670 he entered service of Archbishop Maximilian Gandolph von Khuenberg in Salzburg. During the 70th he composed 15 Mystery sonatas for violin and continuo, in 1673-74 Missa Christi Resurgentis, in 1674 Vespres, 1676 12 Sonatae tam aris quam aulis servientes published in Salzburg. In 1679 he was appointed Vice-Kapellmeister at the Salzburg court. In 1680 he published six suites for strings Mensa sonora. In 1682 he composed Missa Salisburgensis for the celebrations to 1 100th anniversary of the founding of the archdiocese of Salzburg. In 1690 he obtained the title "Biber von Bibern", he visited his birth place. In 1690-92 he composed his only extant opera Arminio, in 1693 Vesperae longiores ac breviores una cum litaniis Lauretanis dedicated to Archbishop J. E. von Thun. In 1697 he composed and directed his Missa Sancti Henrici for the investiture of his daughter Anna Magdalena at Benedictine convent of Salzburg. In 1704 he died in Salzburg and buried in St. Peter´s cemetery.

    Links:
    www.bluntinstrument.org.uk


  • National Theatre in Brno

    (* 6.12.1884 Brno)


  • Bohuslav MARTINŮ

    (* 8.12.1890 Polička - † 28.8.1959 Liestal)

    český skladatel


    Czech composer

    B. Martinů was born in the tower of St James' church in Polička as the son of cobbler and sentinel Ferdinand Martinů and his wife Karolina. In 1906 he began studying violin at the Prague Conservatoire, from which he is "expelled for irreparable negligence" on 4 June 1910. In 1912 he started writing the piano cycle Loutky (Puppets,1912-23), his first "proper" work. In 1920 in the autumn became permanent member of the Czech Philharmonic, placed on the 3rd desk of the 2nd violins. In 1923 he goes to Paris in October to study composition with Albert Roussel and he lives in Paris until 1940 as a free-lance composer, usually spending the summer months in Polička. In the summer 1924 Martinů wrote the orchestral rondo Half-Time in Polička, his first mature work. One year later he wrote his String Quartet No. 2, a work, which gave him international recognition. In 1926 he was introduced to Charlotte Quennehen, who would become his wife. He writes La Bagarre for large orchestra. In 1927 among others, he completed his first opera Voják a tanečnice (The Soldier and the Dancer) and the jazz ballet Kuchyňská revue (Kitchen Revue). He made the acquaintance of Dr Miloš Šafránek, later the composer's assistant and biographer founding of Ecole de Paris, whose members included Martinů, Mihalovici, Beck and Harsányi, later also Tansman and Cherepnin. In1931 he married Charlotte Quennehen. In 1932 Martinů completed his evening ballet Špalíček and also his String Sextet, which wins 1st Prize from the Elisabeth Sprague-Coolidge Foundation in Washington. During 1934-36 among others, he wrote the opera cycle Hry o Marii (The Miracles of Mary, 1934), the radio operas Hlas lesa (Voice of the Woods) and Komedie na mostě (Comedy on the Bridge,1935), and especially the opera Julietta aneb snář (Julietta or the Dream Book, completed in January 1937). In 1937 he met the composer Vítězslava Kaprálová, later to become his pupil and lover. He writes the cantata Kytice (Bouquet) and Concerto grosso for chamber orchestra. One year later Julietta was premiered in March in the National Theatre in Prague. It was a year of a series of supreme works, among them Tre ricercari for chamber orchestra, Concertino for piano and orchestra, String Quartet No. 5. On the day of the Munich Agreement (29. 9.) he finished a commission for Paul Sacher - Double Concerto for Two String Orchestras, Piano and Timpani. In 1939 Martinů is also working on his cantata Field Mass for Czech volunteers in France. In 1940-41 he emigrated to the USA via the South of France, Spain and Portugal. Most of his manuscripts remain in France; he takes only 4 scores with him. While on the move he writes Sinfonietta giocosa for piano and small orchestra. He settles in New York and works written this year include Concerto da camera for violin and chamber orchestra: On December 14th was premiered his Concerto grosso, performed by Sergei Kussevitzky and the Boston Symphony Orchestra and he enjoys tremendous success. In 1942-43 he writes Symphony No. 1 and he adds a new symphony to his repertoire with each year (until 1946). In the summer teaches composition at a summer course in the Berkshire Music Centre he later teaches at the Mannes School of Music in New York and at Princeton University (from 1948). In 1943 he wrote his Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra, Concerto No. 2 for violin and orchestra for Misha Elman, and the orchestral work Památník Lidicím (Memorial to Lidice). In 1944 he began an affair with Rosalie Barstow, which lasts until 1954. From 1946 he teaches again at the Berkshire Music School. On 17 July suffers a serious injury, the consequences of which (severe hearing difficulties, giddiness and headaches) would plague him for the rest of his life. He writes Toccata e due canzoni for Paul Sacher and his Basle Chamber Orchestra. In 1948 he completes his Piano Concerto No. 3 and abandons the idea to return to Czechoslovakia. During the summer he visited Europe (France and Switzerland). He was appointed professor of composition at Princeton University (New Jersey) in September where he stays until 1951. In this year he began work on his Fantaisies symphoniques (Symphony No. 6), completed in 1953. He received the prize for the production of Comedy on the Bridge (1935) at the Mannes School of Music. In 1952 he acquired American citizenship but leaves the USA the following year and settles with Charlotte in Nice, from this time lives primarily in France, Italy and Switzerland. In 1954 he meets Nikos Kazantzakis, begins work on the opera Řecké pašije (Greek Passion). In 1955 he creates a number of exquisite works: the oratorio Epos o Gilgamešovi (The Epic of Gilgamesh), Concerto for oboe and small orchestra, the orchestral frescoes Piero della Francesca. Charles Munch premiered the Fantaisies symphoniques in Boston and New York with the Boston Symphony Orchestra; for this work Martinů received the annual prize awarded by the New York Music Critics' Circle. In this year he returned to the USA for the last time for a few months at the end of the year In 1956 he wrote Inkantace (Incantations - Piano Concerto No. 4), he was awarded another grant from the Guggenheim Foundation for the opera the Greek Passion, the first version of which is completed in January of the following year. In 1957-58 - Paul and Maya Sacher invited Martinů once more to Schönenberg near Basle; he and Charlotte settled there permanently from September onwards. Martinů wrote his Piano Concerto No. 5. In 1958 he wrote the orchestral work Paraboly (Parables), the opera Ariadne and began the second version of the Greek Passion. In 1959 perhaps sensing his approaching death, he frantically produced one work after another: he finished the second version of the Greek Passion, particularly the Nonet, Czech Madrigals for five solo voices, Chamber Music No. 1 and the cantatas Mikeš of the Mountains and Prorok Izaiáš (the Prophecy of Isaiah). He died on 28 August in a cantonal hospital in Liestal near Basle and was buried in Schönenberg. His remains were transferred to his native Polička in 1979

    Links
    www.martinu.cz


  • Karel REINER

    (* 27.6.1910 Žatec - † 17.10.1979 Praha)

    český skladatel

    Czech pianist and composer

    He received his basic music education with his father, cantor in Žatec. After, he studied law at the German University in Prague and musicology at Charles University. He also absolved Suk´s master class (in 1931) and Hába´s micro-interval department (1935). 1934-38 he worked as a pianist and composer in Burian´s D 34 Theatre, he recorded for the Esta gramophone company. During the war, he was interned in the concentration camps. After the war in 1945 he returned to Prague and prepared the performance of Hába´s opera the Mother for the Theatre of the 5th of May. He was interested in the performing of contemporary piano music, he worked as a music organiser, wrote to music journals (especially Rytmus). His composing style is close to Hába´s methodology, after he included also new post-war techniques. He is especially author of chamber music (over 250 compositions).


  • František KOVAŘÍČEK

    (* 17.5.1924 Litětiny - † 7.1.2003 Praha)

    český houslista a pedagog


  • Petr ČECH

    (* 18.3.1979 Praha)

    český varhaník


  • Andrew Yin SVOBODA

    (* 4.2.1977 Burlington (Ontario) - † 29.12.2004 Burlington (Ontario))

    skladatel česko-čínského původu


    Composer of czech-chinese origin

    More information here.


  • Barbora HAASOVÁ

    (* 8.6.1994 Plzeň)

    česká flétnistka


  • Karel BERMAN

    (* 14.4.1919 Jindřichův Hradec - † 11.8.1995 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - bas, ředitel opery, pedagog, překladatel libret

    Czech bass singer, opera director, pedagogue, translater of liberttos. He studied singing at the Prague Conservatory with Egon Fuchs and Hilbert Vávra, direction with Ferdinand Pujman, conducting with Pavel Dědeček, and composition with Rudolf Karel and Viktor Ullmann. In 1943/44, he was deported to the Theresiendstadt Ghetto for the racial reasons. He survived the concentration camps in Osvetim, Kaufering and Allach near Dachau (1944–45). In 1946, graduated from the Conservatory and became a soloist and the director of the Opera in Opava. From 1948, he was engaged in Pilsen, and between 1953 and 1991 at the National Theatre in Prague. From 1961 to 1971 he taught at the Conservatory and from 1964 to 1987 at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague. He had a sonour and agile bass voice and oustanding dramatic talent. His repertoire was based on the roles of Czech operas composed by B. Smetana (Kecal from The Bartered Bride, Bonifác from The Secret, Paloucký from The Kiss), by A. Dvořák (Water Sprite in Rusalka, Burgrave in Jakobin), by L. Janáček (Game Warden in The Cunning Little Vixen, Dikoj in Káťa Kabanová) and by B. Martinů (The Greek Passion). The role of Leporello from Mozart´s Don Giovanni was his must famous role. His other important roles included i.e. Filip II. in Verdi´s Don Carlos, Bartolo in Rossini´s Barber of Seville, Mefisto in Gounod´s Faust, Rocco in Beethoven´s Fidelio, Boris Godunov in Musorgski ´s Boris Godunov as well as other roles in opera composed by R. Wagner. He performed approximately 3500 stages. He became known also as a concert singer. He arranged several operatic librettos, in 1978 he wrote a libretto to Ivo Jirásek´s opera The Bear (1978) based on the short play by Chekhov.


  • Vilém HOFBAUER

    (* 2.4.1999 Třešť)

    český trumpetista


  • Karel KRYL

    (* 12.4.1944 Kroměříž - † 3.3.1994 Mnichov)

    český písničkář


    Czech songster and poet

    He started with performances at the beginning of 60th. He was a cofounder of the Theatre for Acquaintances in Teplice (1964). From the year 1968 he lived in Prague. In 1969 as a rebound to the August's occupation he edited the album Little Brother, Close the Gate. After, he emigrated. In the years 1969-89 he was living abroad, made a concerts (in Scandinavia, Canada, USA, Germany), he worked as an editor of Radio station Free Europe in Germany, wrote songs and poetic collections. 1973-79 he studied history of art and journalist in Munich. He edited a songbook Hraje a zpívá Karel Kryl (Karel Kryl Plays and Sings, 1969) and discs Rakovina (Cancer,1969), Maškary (Masks, 1970), Carmina resurrectionis (1974), Karavana mraků (Caravan of Clouds, 1979), Plaváček (1983), Ocelárna (Steelworks, 1986, enlarged 1994), Tekuté písky (Liquid Sands, 1990), Monology (Monologues, 1993). There were edited also the collections of texts and poetry: Knížka Karla Kryla (Book of Karel Kryl, 1972), Sedm básniček na zrcadle (Seven Short Poems on the Mirror, 1974), the book of dialogues: Půlkacíř (Half-Heretic, 1993). Successful songs include Veličenstvo kat (Majesty Headsman), Anděl (Engel), Jeřabiny (Rowan) and others. As an important person of Czech protest-song he gave concerts in December 1989 to the occasion of political meetings in Czechoslovakia. He died untimely in Munich. The disc Děkuji (Thanks), Jedůfky, Steelworks or Australské momentky (Moments from Australia) were edited after his dead.

    Links:
    http://www.karelkryl.com


  • Walter HOFBAUER

    (* 22.7.1994 Jihlava)

    český trumpetista a tubista


  • Barbora BRABCOVÁ

    (* 13.8.1994 Tábor)

    česká klavíristka


  • Magdaléna HRUDOVÁ

    (* 16.6.1994 Frýdek-Místek)

    česká klavíristka


  • František Antonín Václav MÍČA

    (* 5.9.1694 Třebíč - † 15.2.1744 Jaroměřice nad Rokytnou)

    český skladatel doby pobělohorské, autor první česky zpívané opery


    Bohemian composer and conductor

    Acted as conductor and composer for the music-loving Count Questenberk in Jaroměřice. He conducted opera performances, he composed opera inserts, congratulation canatatas, seplocras, and other occasional musical compositions. The most paramount of his composing activities was, however, the opera O původu Jaroměřic (About the Origins of Jaroměřice), preserved with both Italian and Czech text. The formal presentations of Míča's opera symphonies are of a remarkable quality and are similar to anti-classical sonata types emerging at that time (Symphony in D major).

    Text: Musica Bona


  • Jiří MELCELIUS

    (* 1.1.1624 Horšovský Týn - † 31.3.1693 Praha)

    český barokní skladatel


  • Jaroslav KŘIČKA

    (* 27.8.1882 Kelč - † 23.1.1969 Praha)

    český skladatel, dirigent, pedagog, organizátor a publicista


    Czech composer, conductor, organiser, pedagogue and publicist

    He studied the Prague Conservatory with K. Knittl and K. Stecker, 1905-6 he finished his study in Berlin. After, he was living in Russia (Dnepropetrovsk) where he promoted Czech Music -i.e. he founded and conducted new symphony orchestra, wrote to the music journals about Czech music life. From 1909 after his return to Prague he became a choirmaster of Hlahol, the choir premiering the work by Janáček, Novák or Jeremiáš. From the year 1918 he was designed professor of composition and in the difficult time of occupation rector of Conservatory. After 1945 he devoted himself to composition. Early compositions are influenced by Russian style: i.e. 1st String Quartet "Russian" (1907), Severní noci (North Nights, 1910), Tři bajky pro soprán a klavír (Three Fables for soprano and piano, 1917), Elegie na smrt Rimského-Korsakova (Elegy to the Death of Rimskij-Korsakov, 1918). Modrý pták (Blue Bird) orchestral ouverture to the Maeterlinck play (1911), opera Hipolyta (1910-16) or opera Bílý pán (White Gentleman) became more known around the world, especially in England. Křička composed in all genres including the music for film or for children. He edited many popular publications.


  • Karel GOTT

    (* 14.7.1939 Plzeň)

    český zpěvák populární hudby, tenor

    He belongs to famous Czech pop singers in Czech Republic and in Europe.

    Initially, he worked as an electrician. Since 50th he sang as an amateur in dancing cafés (i. e. with famous jazz conductor Karel Krautgartner) and he was interested in plastic art.

    In 1958 he attired attention of specialists in the competition of pop music, since 1960 he devoted himself exclusively to singing and had taking lessons with prof. Karenin (1963-66).

    Not before the middle of 60th, he establishes himself because around the world the ideal of voice changed on behalf of tenors. In 1963 the song Snowbound Eyes with poetic text by Jiří Suchý became a hit. He received the first price in pop public inquiry of the journal Mladý svět Goldy Nightingale.

    In 1965 he found with brothers Štaidls a club Apollo where he sang to the year 1967, after he received seven month’s contract in Las Vegas. After, he made a tour of Canada, USA and West Europe with great success. All years he has received Goldy Nightingale. A cooperation with composer Karel Svoboda helped to his successful career. In 1977, he recorded the song devoted to Jan Palach My Brother Jan.

    His career has continued without interruption also after 1989. He absolved successful tour of Germany. In 1992, his album When Man Eats Breakfast with a Woman became the best selling CD of the year. In 1996, he received again the price of Czech Nightingale. He absolved successful tour of Saudi Arabia, China and in concert in Carnegie Hall.

    He is also fruitful in his painting, and smaller roles in Czech films. To his more successful songs belong: Lady Carnival, Bee Maya, Little Bird, Where you Has a Niche (Karel Svoboda).

    Selection of CDs: Rock'n'roll Party (1990), When Man Eats Breakfast with a Woman (1992), Things Near to My Heart (1993), Karel Gott 95 (1995), Original Recordings from Eighties (1995).

    Selection of film roles: Lemonade Joe (1964, voice of titule role), If a Thousand Clarinets (1964), Our Czech Song (1967), Delights of Father of the Homeland (1969), The Star is Falling up (1974), Romance for a Crown (1975), The Scorcher Team (1976), Goblins and Good Luck 2 (2001).

    Links:
    Official webpage
    www.karelgott.net
    Wikipedia


  • Jan HANUŠ

    (* 2.5.1915 Praha - † 30.7.2004 Praha)

    český skladatel


  • Berta FOERSTEROVÁ-LAUTEREROVÁ

    (* 11.1.1869 Praha - † 9.4.1936 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    She was the wife of composer Josef Bohuslav Foerster.

    She studied singing in Prague from her children's years, and between 1883 to 1887, she studied at the Prague Conservatory.

    In 1887, she made her debut at the National Theatre in Prague as Agata in Weber's Der Freischütz. She was engaged here until 1893. In 1888, she was the first Desdemona in the Czech premiere of Verdi's Otello, Tatiana in Czech premiere of Tchaikovsky Eugen Onegin where was composer in attendance.

    She sang most of soprano roles of the Czech repertoire at the National Theatre (Smetana, Dvořák; Foerster's Debora). From 1893 she was engaged in Hamburg, where she cooperated with Gustav Mahler. In 1901, Mahler engaged her to the Court Opera in Vienna, where she finished her career in 1913. From 1918, she lived in Prague where she often still held concerts. Her repertoire included almost 50 roles (including the Wagnerian roles of Venus and Elisabeth in Tannhäuser, Elsa in Lohengrin, Eva in Masters Singers from Norimberg.


  • Jiří BRÜCKLER

    (* 1.1.1984 Liberec)

    český operní pěvec - baryton

    Festivals: International Music Festival Český Krumlov (since 2011).

    Reviews, articles: Verdi- Don Carlo, National Theatre Praha: "Jiří Brückler, despite being very young, showed us that he has one of the most beautiful Czech baritones; his voice has a nice colour and it will be interesting to keep our eyes peeled." (momus.hu April 24, 2013). "A young baritone with an excellently trained and nicely coloured voice uses all his dynamic scale from fine pianissimos to resonant fortes in the role of Rodrigo. As an actor, he distinguished between marquis’s warm friendship with infant Carlo from cautious diplomacy when negotiating with King Philip II. The highlight of his performance was the scene in the prison, where he bids farewell and dies." Thalia Awards Magazine, 2013).

    Links:
    www.bruckler.eu
    www.narodni-divadlo.cz/cs/umelec/jiri-brueckler

    Contact:
    e-mail: info@bruckler.eu


  • Jana VONÁŠKOVÁ-NOVÁKOVÁ

    (* 7.12.1979 Plzeň)

    česká houslistka


  • Ondřej VRABEC

    (* 15.5.1979 Vysoké Mýto)

    český hráč na lesní roh a dirigent


  • Petra HAVRÁNKOVÁ

    (* 1.1.1989 Praha)

    česká pěvkyně - soprán

    Reviews, articles:
    "Petra Havránková gave an excellent performance of the dramatic coloratura role of the Queen of the Night; this woman radiated hatred and the will to take revenge on Sarastro and his land of wisdom." (Operaplus, April 2014).

    Contact:
    e-mail: havrankova.petra@post.cz


  • Simona MRÁZOVÁ

    (* 1.1.1989 Zlín)

    česká operní pěvkyně - mezzosoprán

    Biography: She works in Ostrava. 
    Guest performances – Silesian Theatre Opava, State Opera Banská Bystrica, State Theatre Košice.
    Cooperation - Janáček Philharmonic Ostrava, Bohuslav Martinů Philharmonic Orchestra, composers Milan Báchorek and Pavel Helebrand and others.

    Studies: Janáček Conservatory in Ostrava (Marianna Pillárová); University of Ostrava (Eliška Pappová); PhD studies at the University of Ostrava (Vlasta Hudecová); master courses with Eva Randová, Vlasta Hudecová and others.

    Repertoire (selection): W. A. Mozart, G. Rossini, J. Offenbach, J. Strauss, G. Verdi, P. Mascagni, A. Dvořák, L. Janáček, G. Mahler, I. Stravinsky, R. Strauss, K. Slavický, M. Báchorek.

    Competitions: Stonavská Barborka (2010, 2011).

    Awards: Thalia Awards 2013 – long-list nomination for the role of Kate / A. Dvořák: Kate and the Devil.

    Festivals: Janáček May, international music festival Talentinum Zlín, Janáček Hukvaldy, Zvolen Castle Plays.

    Recordings:
    YouTube: W. A. Mozart- Smanie implacabili /Così fan tutte  (2012).

    Reviews, articles: "Although Simona Mrázková graduated from the Janáček Conservatory only three years ago, her performance of Káča surprised us with the balanced singing and acting. She managed to create a very lively and natural character and caught our attention with the joy of play and her interest as if the freckled red-haired cheeky girl had been written for her." (Thalia Awards magazine 2013).

    Links: www.facebook.com/SimonaMrazova.opera

    Agency: Janáček May agency

    Kontakt:
    e-mail: simonamrazova.opera@gmail.com


  • Matěj CHADIMA

    (* 20.2.1979 Praha)

    český operní pěvec - basbaryton

    Biography:
    Guest performances – National Theatre Prague, State Opera Prague, J. K. Tyl Theatre in Pilsen, National Moravian-Silesian Theatre in Ostrava, F. X. Šalda Theatre in Liberec, South Bohemian Theatre in České Budějovice.
    Cooperation - Czech Philharmonic, PKF – Prague Philharmonia, Brno Philharmonic, South Czech Philharmonic České Budějovice, Czech Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra in Pardubice, North Czech Philharmonic Teplice, Zagreb Philharmonic Orchestra, Prague Symphony Orchestra, Camerata Nova, Suk Symphony Orchestra Prague and others.

    Studies:
    Prague Conservatory / violin; private lessons (Jiří Kotouč); Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (Martin Bárta).

    Repertoire (selection):
    W. A. Mozart, G. Donizetti, G. Rossini, A. Dvořák, B. Smetana, Ch. Gounod, G. Verdi, R. Leoncavallo, G. F. Händel, G. Bizet, J. S. Bach, F. Schubert, J. Strauss, J. J. Ryba and others.

    Competitions:
    Antonín Dvořák International Singing Competition in Karlovy Vary (2011, 2nd prize Opera, 1st prize AD Honorem Mozart).

    Festivals:
    Prague Spring (2012), Strings of Autumn (2013), Dvořák Prague (2013), Tomášek Skuteč (2010).

    Recordings:
    L. van Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 in D minor (EXTON, 2010);
    Haydn / Beethoven Cantatas (Arcodiva 2012).

    Reviews, articles:
    "Matěj Chadima as an actor is very flexible and tractable Papageno; he mastered his part excellently using his nice timber and provided his character with outer and inner logic. A nice and almost dramatic diction of spoken passages helped him as well..." (Hudební rozhledy, 2010, No. 5).

    Agency:
    M.S.A. production

    Contact:
    e-mail: chadima@toress.cz


  • Lucie SILKENOVÁ

    (* 12.5.1984 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Biography: Workplace - permanent guest of the National Theatre in Prague, State Opera. Guest performances - F. X. Šalda Theatre in Liberec, J. K. Tyl Theatre in Pilsen, National Moravian-Silesian Theatre in Ostrava.
    Cooperation - BBC Symphony Orchestra London, Budapest Festival Orchestra, Orquestra Sinfônica do Estado de São Paulo, Czech Philharmonic, Prague Symphony Orchestra and others.

    Studies: Jan Neruda Grammar School in Prague (M. Bělohlávková); Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (I. Kusnjer); master courses with Anatolli Goussev, Gery Grice, Rotraud Hansmann, Margreet Honig, Tom Krause, Georg Nigl, Margot Nollen, Alexander Olivier, Tomas Paul, Marta Scheffel.

    Repertoire (selection): J. S. Bach, K. Bendl, G. Bizet, B. Britten, R. Clarke, V. Dobiáš, G. Donizetti, A. Dvořák, Z. Fibich, L. Fišer, J. Hájek, G. F. Händel, M. Ivanović, L. Janáček, J. Klusák, E. W. Korngold, J. Křička, M. Kubička, F. Lehár, Z. Liška, G. Mahler, B. Martinů, F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, V. Micka, W. A. Mozart, J. Offenbach, G. Rossini, F. Schubert, R. Schumann, B. Smetana, R. Strauss, G. Verdi, H. Villa-Lobos, R. Wagner, A. Lloyd-Webber.

    Competitions: Antonín Dvořák International Singing Competition in Karlovy Vary (2007, 2nd prize Junior; 2009, 2nd prize Opera); Concours International d'Encouragement Musical, Lyon (2008, 1st prize); Hans Gabor Belvedere Singing Competition, Amsterdam (2013, semi-final rounds).

    Festivals: Prague Spring (2011), international opera festival Smetana's Litomyšl (2011, 2012, 2014); Janáček May Ostrava (2014), Dvořák's Olomouc (2014), international festival Mahler—Jihlava (2009).

    Recordings: Bohuslav Martinů- Le Jour de Bonte (ArcoDiva, 2010); Sophia Serghi- Night of Light (Navona Records, 2012).

    YouTube: R. Strauss: Four Last Songs (2012); L. Janáček: Glagolitic Mass (2014); A. Dvořák: Ach bože, božínku / Terinka, Jakobín (2012).

    Reviews, articles: "Soprano Lucie Silkenová gave a solo performance accompanied by eight violoncellos; she has a crystal, yet dark timber. The higher pitches ring colourful overtones filling the big Smetana Hall, which does not have very good acoustics." (Rozhlas Weekly, No. 10, 2013, volume 23).
    "Über die Sopran-Interpretation der Rosina von Lucie Silkenová wird zu reden sein, nicht nur weil sie die technischen Schwierigkeiten der Rolle mit einer phantastischen Agilität und vortrefflicher Triller- und Staccato Technik singt und ihre berühmte Auftrittsarie mit einem lockeren Sprung auf das F in der Höhe abschließt. Die Sängerin (als Gast von der Staatsoper Prag) hat sichtbar und hörbar immensen Spaß an der Partie und fügt immer wieder improvisierte Koloraturen mit einer Leichtigkeit und Leuchtkraft ein, dass man aus dem Staunen nicht mehr herauskommt. Selbst in der Finalszene wird noch mal ein Feuerwerk an Fioraturen und Spitzentönen abgeschossen. Ovationen und lautstarke Bravos für eine wirklich prächtige Leistung." (Mainpost, 28. 11. 2011).

    Links:
    www.luciesilkenova.cz

    Agency: ArcoDiva Management agency

    Contact:
    e-mail: luciesilkenova@gmail.com


  • Petra FROESE

    (* 1.1.1979 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Biography:
    Cooperation – Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Prague Symphony Orchestra, State Opera Prague, National Theatre Brno, Hradec Králové Philharmonic Orchestra, North Czech Philharmonic Teplice, Czech Chamber Orchestra, Virtuosi di Praga, Cappella Istropolita, Trio Syrinx, Sinfonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Deutsche Radiophilharmonie Saarbrücken, MDR Sinfonieorchester Leipzig, Orchester der Museumsgesellschaft Frankfurt, Stuttgarter Philharmoniker,  Basler Kammerorchester, Berliner Camerata, Staatskapelle Weimar, Philharmonique de Nice, Euskadi Orchestra, Warsaw Philharmonic, Qatar Philharmonic and others.

    Studies:
    private lessons with Jarmila Krásová, Jana Jonášová, Irmgard Boas.

    Repertoire (selection):
    L. van Beethoven, B. Smetana, A. Dvořák, F. Schubert, R. Schumann, F. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, R. Wagner, J. Brahms, G. Mahler, R. Strauss, A. Schönberg, B. Britten, B. Martinů, C. Schumannová, A. Mahlerová, P. Viardotová.

    Festivals:
    Dvořák Prague (2014), Smetana’s Litomyšl (2011), Mahler Jihlava music festival (2014), Festival de Musique de Strasbourg (2010), Al Bustan Festival, Lebanon (2006).

    Recordings:
    A. Dvořák: Alfred, the role of Alvina (ArcoDiva/Naxos, 2014/2015); Songs by German Composers (Arco/Diva, 2014/2015).

    YouTube:
    C. Schumann: Er ist gekommen im Sturm und Regen (2013); A. Mahler: Bei dir ist es traut, Extase (2013).

    Reviews:
    "Remarkable balance and Petra Froese´s exceptional voice was demonstrated in the most complicated figures and pitfalls of the piece." (Qatar Tribune, November 13, 2011 on Beethoven’s "Ah perfido").

    Links:
    www.petrafroese.com

    Contact:
    e-mail: petra.pes@centrum.cz


  • Antonín DVOŘÁK

    (* 8.9.1841 Nelahozeves - † 1.5.1904 Praha)

    český skladatel, violista a dirigent

    Antonín Dvořák was born in Nelahozeves, a small Bohemian village near Prague. His father was an inn-keeper and butcher but he also played the zithar. Dvořák took his first singing and violin lessons at the village school. At the age of 14 he was sent to Zlonice to learn German but he prefered music lessons. He was learning the organ, viola, piano and basic composition with Antonin Liehmann. His interest in music was such that his father allowed him to enrol at the Prague Organ School in 1857 where he received the strict training of a church musician but also attended many concerts of his contemporaries. From 1857 he played viola in the Cecilia Society concerts. After graduation from the Prague Organ School in 1859, Dvořák joined the band of Komzák, which formed later Provisional Theatre Orchestra as head violist (for a time conducted by Smetana). Though this was a steady job Dvořák needed more income. He taught music to girls from rich families including Anna Cermakova, who he married in 1873. Because of the lack of free time Dvořák finally gave up the orchestra to compose full time in 1871. In 1874-1877 Dvořák won the Austrian National Prize several times and received a much needed cash prize, but more importantly he won the respect and the friendship of Brahms who was one of the judges in the competition. Brahms recommended to his publisher Fritz Simrock in Berlin to publish some of Dvořák's works, and considered him an extraordinarily talented artist (Dvořák was 37 at that time). Simrock commissioned the first set of Slavonic Dances in 1878, which launched Dvořák´s international reputation. From 1874 to 1877 Dvořák also played organ at the church of St. Vojtěch in the New Town of Prague. In 1884 Dvořák took his first of nine visits to London to conduct his Stabat Mater (1876-77) which had scored a tremendous success the previous year. His popularity in Britain was immediate and sustained both as composer and conductor. Many of his works, such as his Seventh (1884-85) and Eighth (1889) Symphonies, the cantata Svatební košile (The Spectre's Bride, 1884), the oratorio St Ludmila (1885-6) and the Requiem (1890) were composed for or first performed in England. In 1891 he recieved an honorary doctorate of music from Cambridge University. In 1891, Dvořák was appointed professor of composition at the Prague Conservatory. He soon left this position to take up the offer of the position of Directorship of the National Conservatory of Music in New York. Two of his most famous works, the Symphony No. 9 in E Minor (1893), titled From the New World, and the best known of his string quartets, Quartet No. 12 in F Major (1893), so-called the "American Quartet", were composed in the U.S. Both of these works made use of themes influenced by American Indian folk melodies and Negro Spirituals. The New World Symphony derived some inspiration from a Czech translation of Longfellow's poem Hiawatha. Dvořák would later admit that the melancholy of these works could be attributed to the homesickness he felt during his time in America. In 1895 just before leaving America, he produced one of his most remarkable symphonic works Cello Concerto in B Minor. Returning to Prague with great relief, Dvořák resumed his position at the Prague Conservatory, and in 1901 became the director. His pupils include his son-in-law Josef Suk, and Vítězslav Novák. Dvořák died from a short illness on the 1st of May 1904 at the age of sixty-two. He is buried in Prague at the Vyšehrad.

    Dvořák exercised a great gift for absorbing folk styles and reproducing them in the context of the Classical tradition. His music is marked by its variety, complexity and versatility. After a period of compositions in German style, Dvořák´s works reflect his deep national consciousness. He is loved for his skill at adapting his native Bohemian folk dances and songs, such as the furiant, polka, skočná, dumka, and sousedská, for use in his compositions, and also for his all Slavonic orientation. Dvořák´s music is notable for a wide variety of genres. He wrote nine symphonies (1865-93) of which the best known must be the Symphony No. 9. The Seventh Symphony, often regarded as his best, powerfully expresses a mood of tragedy. In contrast, the Eight Symphony makes use of the folk melodies and colorful orchestration. The Symphony No. 1 in C Minor from 1865 is called "Zlonické zvony" (The Bells of Zlonice). Works for solo instrument and orchestra by Dvořák include a Cello Concerto in A Major (1865), a Violin Concerto in A Minor (1880) and a Piano Concerto in G Minor (1876) which make together with The Romance for Violin (1873-77), and Klid (The Silent Woods, 1893) for violoncello, important parts of solo repertoire for the instruments. Other orchestral works include two sets of Slavonic Dances (1878 and 1886), originally designed for piano duet, Serenade for Strings in E Major (1875), Symphonic Variations (1877), three Slavonic Rhapsodies (1878), Česká suita (Czech Suite, 1879), Legendy (Legends, 1881) also orchestrated by Dvořák from his original piano duet version, and Scherzo capriccioso (1883). Dvořák wrote five overtures, Můj domov (My Homeland, 1881), Husitská (Hussite, 1883), V přírodě (In Nature's Realm, 1891), Othello (1891-92), and Karneval (Carnival, 1891). Symphonic poems Vodník (The Water Goblin, 1896), Polednice (The Noon Witch, 1896), Zlatý kolovrat (The Golden Spinning Wheel, 1896), Holoubek (The Wild Dove, 1896) are written on K. J. Erben´s collection of folktales Kytice, Píseň bohatýrská (Heroic Song, 1897) has Dvořák´s own programme. From Dvořák´s eleven operas should be named Král a uhlíř (King and Charcoal Burner, 1871), Tvrdé palice (The Stubborn Lovers, 1874), a tragic opera Vanda (1875), Šelma sedlák (The Cunning Peasant, 1877), Dimitrij (1881-82), Jakobín (The Jacobin, 1887-88, rev. 1897), a comic opera Čert a Káča (The Devil and Kate, 1898-89) and a famous lyric fairy tale Rusalka from 1900. Choral works which won him such a following not only in late Victorian England are Stabat Mater, dramatic cantata after Erben The Spectre's Bride, oratorio St Ludmila, Mass in D (1887), Requiem, Te Deum (1892) and Hymnus (1872). Dvořák wrote many songs in number of sets, notably Cypřiše (Cypress Trees, 1865) to words by Pflager, Písně milostné (Love Songs, 1888), Večerní písně (Evening Songs, 1876, orch. 1882) on Hálek, Tři novořecké básně (Three Modern Greek Poems, 1878), Cigánské melodie (Gipsy Songs, 1880) including well-known Songs my Mother taught me and Biblické písně (Biblical Songs, 1894). Very popular is the set of Moravské dvojzpěvy (Moravian Duets, 1875-76), in his Z kytice národních písní slovanských (From a Bouquet of Slavonic Folksongs, 1877-78) and Kytice z českých národních písní (From a Bouquet of Czech Folksongs, 1877) we can see his folklore orientation. Notable from Dvořák´s chamber music are 14 string quartets, the American or Quartet no. 10 in E flat Major (1878-79), Slovanský (Slavonic) (1878-79), string quintets, String Sextet in A Major (1878), from 5 piano trios the Trio in E Minor nick-named Dumky (1890-91) is the best known, piano quartets and quintet, Maličkosti (Bagatelles, 1878) for 2 violins, cello and harmonium, Terzetto (1887) for 2 violins and viola, and Sonata (1880) and Sonatina (1893) for violin. Dvořák´s piano works include Siluety (Silhouettes, 1879), Poetické nálady (Poetic Tone Pictures, 1889), works inspired by folk dances Dumka and Furiant (1884), Dumka (1876 or 1878), Waltzes (1879-80), Mazurkas (1880) and Humoresques (1894, Humoresque No. 7 is the famous one), also piano duets - 16 Slavonic Dances (1878, 1886), Legends (1880-81) and Ze Šumavy (From the Bohemian Forest, 1883-84).

    Links:
    www.antonindvorak2004.cz
    www.dvorak-society.org
    dvorak.musicabona.com
    bohemia.tripod.com

    Biblography:
    K. Hoffmeister: Antonín Dvořák (Engl.transl.1928, orig. Prague, 1924)
    J. Burghauser: Antonín Dvořák (Engl.transl.1967, orig.Prague, 1966)
    O. Šourek: Dvořák´s Werke: ein vollständiges Verzeichnis (Berlin, 1917)
    O. Šourek: Antonín Dvořák (Engl.transl.1952, orig. Prague, 1929)
    O. Šourek: Antonín Dvořák: Letters and Reminiscences (Engl. transl. 1954, orig. Prague, 1938)
    V. Fischl, ed.: Antonín Dvořák: his Achievement (London, 1943)
    A. Robertson: Dvořák (London, 1945, 2.1964)
    J. Clapham: Dvořák (Newton Abbot, 1979)
    H. H. Schönzeler: Dvořák (London and New York, 1984)
    M. Beckerman, ed.: Dvořák and his World (Princeton, NJ, 1993)
    A. Hořejší: Antonín Dvořák: the Composer´s Life and Work in Pictures (Prague, 1955)
    J. H. Yoell: Antonín Dvořák on Records (New York, 1991)

    Discography:
    Orchestral
    8 Slavonic Dances, Op. 46, 8 Slavonic Dances, Op. 72
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Rafael Kubelik
    1 CD Decca
    Carnival - Concert Overture, Op. 92
    Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in A minor, Op. 53 (Allegro ma non troppo)
    Serenade for String Orchestra in E major, Op. 22 (Moderato)
    Concerto for Cello and Orchestra No. 2 in B minor, Op. 104 (Allegro)
    Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major, Series II, Op. 72
    Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88 (Allegretto grazioso)
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World", Op. 95 (Largo, Allegro con fuoco)
    Josef Suk - violin, Angelica May - cello
    Prague Philharmonia, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
    Karel Ancerl, Jiri Belohlavek, Vaclav Neumann - conductors
    CD Supraphon
    Carnival Overture, Op. 92, Symphonic Variations, Op. 78, Husitska Overture, Op. 67 (Hussite), Muj Domov Overture, Op. 62 (My Country), The Noon Witch, Op. 108, Othello Overture, Op. 93, The Golden Spinning Wheel (Zlaty kolovrat), Op.109, Overture In Nature's Realm, Op. 91
    London Symphony Orchestra, Istvan Kertesz
    2 CD Decca
    Carnival, Op. 92, Humoresque No. 7 in G flat major, Op. 101, Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major
    Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, Bohumil Kulinsky / Vaclav Smetacek
    CD Multisonic
    Cello Concerto in B minor op.104
    Mischa Maisky - Cello
    Israel Philharmonic, Leonard Bernstein
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Concert in A minor, Op. 53, Romance in F minor, Op. 11, Mazurek in E minor, Op. 49
    Frantisek Novotny - violin
    Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Studio Matous
    Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in A minor, Op. 53, Romance for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 11,
    Mazurek for Violin and Orchestra in E minor, Op. 49
    Vaclav Hudecek - violin
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon
    Concerto in A minor for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 53
    Gabriela Demeterova - violin
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Libor Pesek
    CD Supraphon
    Concerto for Piano and Orchestra in G minor, Op. 33
    Rudolf Firkusny - piano
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon
    Czech Suite, Op. 39
    Talich Quartet
    Prague Chamber Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Lotos
    Holoubek / The Wild Dove, Op. 110, Vodnik / The Water-Goblin, Op. 107, Zlaty kolovrat / The Golden Spinning-Wheel, Op. 109
    Janacek Philharmonic Orchestra, Petr Vronsky
    CD Panton
    Humoresque No. 7 in G flat major, Op. 101, Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World [Z Noveho sveta, Novosvetska]", Carnival, Concert Overture, Op. 92, Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major, Op. 72
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Vaclav Smetacek
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek / Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon
    In Natures Realm, Concert Overture, Op. 91, Scherzo Capriccioso, Op. 66
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Sejna
    CD Supraphon
    Legends, Op. 59, Czech Suite in D major, Op. 39
    Prague Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Clarton
    Miniatures, Nocturne in B major, Op. 40
    Josef Suk - violin
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD SKO
    Othello op.93, Symphony no.9 in E minor op.95 "From the New World"
    Berlin Philharmonic, Claudio Abbado
    1 CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Romance for Violin and Orchestra op.11
    Gil Shaham - Violin
    Orpheus Chamber Orchestra
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Serenade E major, Op. 22, Two Waltzes, Op. 54/1; Op. 54/4
    Suk Chamber Orchestra, Josef Suk
    CD SKO
    Serenade for String Orchestra in E major, Op. 22
    Berliner Philharmoniker, Herbert Karajan
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Slavonic Dance No. 10 in E minor, Op. 72, No. 2, Festival March, Op. 54, Slavonic Dance No. 15 in C major, Op. 72, No. 7, Slavonic Dance No. 9 in B major, Op. 72, No. 1
    Prague Symphony Orchestra, Zdenek Macal
    CD MusicVars
    Slavonic Dance no.1 in C major op.46 no.1, Slavonic Dance no.10 in E minor op.72 no.2, Slavonic Dance no.3 in A flat major op.46 no.3, Slavonic Dance no.16 in A flat major op.72 no.8, Slavonic Dance no.7 in C minor op.46 no.7, Scherzo capriccioso op.66
    Berlin Philharmonic, Herbert von Karajan
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    Slavonic Dances, Symphony No. 8, In Nature's Realm, Carnival, Othello, Symphony No. 9 "From the New World", The Water Goblin, The Noon Witch, The Golden Spinning Wheel, The Wild Dove,
    Concerto for Cello and Orchestra No. 2, Concerto for Piano and Orchestra, Stabat Mater
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Talich
    13 CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 1 in C minor 'The Bells of Zlonice', Symphony No. 2 in B flat major, Symphony No. 3 in E flat major, Symphony No. 4 in D minor, Symphony No. 5 in F minor, Symphony No. 6 in D major, Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Symphony No. 8 in G major, Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World"
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    6 CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 1 'The Bells of Zlonice', Symphony No. 2, Op. 4, Symphony No. 3, Op. 10, Symphony No. 4, Op. 13, Symphony No. 5, Op. 76, Symphony No. 8, Op. 88, Symphony No. 6, Op. 60, Symphony No. 7, Op. 70, Symphony No. 9, Op. 95 'From the New World'
    Scottish National Orchestra, Edwin Paling, Neeme Jarvi
    6 CD Chandos
    Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70, Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 "From the New World"
    Wiener Philharmoniker, Rafael Kubelik
    CD Decca
    Symphony No. 8 in G major "English", Op. 88, Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World", Op. 95
    Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Radioservis
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor "From the New World", Op. 45, Carnival, Concert Overture, Op. 92,
    Symphonic Variations, Op. 78
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 "From the New World [Z Noveho sveta, Novosvetska]"
    Te Deum for Soloists, Choir and Orchestra, Op. 103
    Gabriela Benackova, Jaroslav Soucek
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Vaclav Neumann
    CD Supraphon
    Symphony No. 9 in E minor, Op. 95 "From the New World", In Nature's Realm - Concert Overture, Op. 91, Carnival - Concert Overture, Op. 92, My Home - Overture, Op. 62a
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    4 CD Supraphon

    Chamber music
    2 Waltzes, Op. 54
    Skampa Quartet (Pavel Fischer - violin, Jana Lukasova - violin, Radim Sedmidubsky - viola, Jonas Krejci - cello)
    CD Supraphon
    Cello Concerto in A major, Polonaise in A major for Cello and Piano, Rondo in G minor for Cello and Piano, Silent Woods for Cello and Piano, Slavonic Dance in G minor for Cello and Piano,
    Slavonic Dance in A major for Cello and Piano
    Jiri Barta - cello, Jan Cech - piano
    2 CD Supraphon
    Dumky, Op. 90
    Kubelik Trio (Jan Talich jun. - violin, Karel Fiala - cello, Kveta Bilynska - piano)
    CD GZ
    From the Bohemian Forest [Ze Sumavy], Op. 68, Legends, Op. 59
    Igor and Renata Ardasev - piano
    CD Supraphon
    Miniatures, Op. 75a (Second Terzetto for Two Violins and Viola), Bagatelles, Op. 47 for Two Violins, Cello and Harmonium, Terzetto, Op. 74 for Two Violins and Viola
    Josef Suk - violin, Ivan Zenaty - violin, Jan Talich - viola, Jiri Barta - cello, Josef Hala - harmonium
    CD Lotos
    Piano Quintet in A major, Op 81, Piano Quartet in E flat major, Op. 87
    Josef Suk, Ivan Zenaty - violins, Jan Peruska - viola, Jiri Barta - cello, Josef Hala - piano
    CD Lotos
    Piano Quintet in A, Op. 5, Piano Quintet in A, Op. 81
    Sviatoslav Richter - piano, Borodin Quartet
    CD Philips
    Piano Quintet, Op. 81, String Quintets No. 3 "American", Op. 97
    Talich Quartet (Petr Messiereur, Vladimir Bukac - violins, Jan Talich - viola, Evzen Rattay - cello)
    Kazuko Mimura - piano, Tasso Adamopoulous - viola
    This recording was awarded the special prize by Le Mande de la Musique
    CD Calliope
    Piano Trio in F minor, Op. 65
    Smetana Trio (Jitka Cechova - piano, Hana Kotkova - violin, Jan Palenicek - cello)
    CD Lotos
    Preludes and Fugues for Organ
    Jaroslav Tuma - organ (Rychnov 1843)
    CD Supraphon
    String Quartet No. 12 in F major, Op. 96 "American"
    Panocha Quartet
    CD Supraphon
    String Quartet in F major "American", Op. 96
    Skampa Quartet
    CD Supraphon
    String Quintet in G major, Op. 77, String Quintet in E flat major, Op. 97
    Josef Suk, Pavel Sporcl - violins, Karel Untermuller, Vladimir Bukac - violas, Tomas Strasil, Jiri Barta - cellos, Tomas Vybiral - double bass
    CD Lotos
    String Sextet in A major, Op. 48
    The Czech Philharmonic Sextet (Bohumil Kotmel, Ota Bartos - violins, Jaroslav Pondelicek, Jan Simon - violas, Frantisek Host, Josef Spacek - cello)
    CD Waldmann

    Operas
    Dimitrij
    Leo Marian Vodicka, Drahomira Drobkova, Magdalena Hajossyova, Livia Aghova, Ivan Kusnjer, Peter Mikulas, Ludek Vele, Zdenek Harvanek, Pavel Haderer
    Prague Radio Chorus, Pavel Kuhn, Czech Philharmonic Chorus, Lubomir Matl
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Gerd Albrecht
    3 CD Supraphon
    Rusalka
    Milada Subrtova, Ivo Zidek, Eduard Haken, Marie Ovcacikova, Alena Mikova
    Prague National Theatre, Chorus and Orchestra, Zdenek Chalabala
    2 CD Supraphon
    Rusalka
    Renee Fleming, Ben Heppner, Dolora Zajick, Franz Hawlata, Eva Urbanova, Ivan Kusnjer, Zdena Kloubova, Dana Buresova, Hana Minutillo
    The Kuhn Mixed Choir, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Sir Charles Mackerras
    3 CD Decca

    Vocal
    Biblical Songs, Gypsy Songs, Three Modern Greek Poems
    Ivan Kusnjer - baritone, Marian Lapsansky - piano
    CD Supraphon
    Biblical Songs, Op. 99
    Eduard Haken - bass, Martin Gotthard Schneider - organ improvisations
    CD Rosa
    Love Songs, Op. 83, Four Songs, Op. 2, In Folk Tone, Op. 73
    Magdalena Kozena - mezzosoprano, Graham Johnson - piano
    CD Deutsche Grammophon
    In Folk Tone, Op. 73, Gypsy Songs, Op. 55, Love Songs, Op. 83, Biblical Songs, Op. 99
    Dagmar Peckova - mezzo-soprano, Irwin Gage - piano
    CD Supraphon
    Biblical Songs, Op 99, Gypsy Songs, Op. 55, Evening Songs, Op. 3, Love Songs, Op. 83
    Vera Soukupova - contraalto, Beno Blachut - tenor, Jindrich Jirak - baritone
    Ivan Moravec, Alfred Holecek, Ferdinand Pohlreich - pianos
    CD Supraphon
    Biblical Songs, Op. 99, Gypsy Melodies, Op. 55
    Eva Urbanova - soprano, J. Pokorny - piano
    CD GZ
    Moravian Duets [Moravske dvojzpěvy]
    Stanislav Bogunia - piano
    Kuhn Mixed Chorus, Pavel Kuhn
    CD Supraphon
    Requiem, Symphonic Variations
    Pilar Lorengar - soprano, Erszebet Komlossy - contralto, Robert Ilosfalvy - tenor, Tom Krause - bass, The Ambrosian Singers, John McCarthy (Dvorak)
    London Symphony Orchestra, Istvan Kertesz
    2 CD Decca
    Requiem - Funeral Mass for Solo Voices, Chorus and Orchestra, Op. 89
    Maria Stader - soprano, Sieglinde Wagner - contralto, Ernst Haefliger - tenor, Kim Borg - bass
    Prague Philharmonic Choir, Marketa Kuhnova, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, Karel Ancerl
    2 CD Supraphon
    Stabat Mater
    Gabriela Benackova, Ortrun Wenkel, Petr Dvorsky, Jan Hendrik Rootering
    Czech Philharmonic Chorus and Orchestra, Wolfgang Sawallisch
    2 CD Supraphon
    Stabat Mater for Soloists, Choir and Orchestra, Op. 58
    Eva Urbanova, Marta Benackova, John Uhlenhopp, Peter Mikulas
    Prague Philharmonic Choir, Bambini di Praga, Prague Smphony Orchestra, Jiri Belohlavek
    live recording
    CD Supraphon
    Svatební košile / The Spectre's Bride, Op. 69
    Zdena Kloubova - soprano, Jaroslav Brezina - tenor, Gustav Belacek - bass
    Kühn Mixed Choir, Pavel Kühn, Prague Radio Symphony Orchestra, Vladimir Valek
    CD Radioservis

    Dvořák Museum is situated in the street Ke Karlovu, Prague 2, in the baroque Michna Summer Palace, also called Vila Amerika, and it´s the property of the A. Dvořák Foundation. The museum houses an exhibition of the life and work of the composer. The exhibition introduces Dvořák's personality, his work as both a composer and pedagogue. One section describes his life and another his musical creations. Photos show him with his family, his friends and interpreters of his music, including manuscripts and documents. Dvořáks personal possessions can also be seen, for example his furniture, piano, violin, awards and more.


  • František Xaver DUŠEK

    (* 8.12.1731 Chotěborky u Jaroměře - † 12.2.1799 Praha)

    hudební skladatel, klavírista a pedagog

    Son of a peasant, he was supported by his patron Count Johann Karl Sporck. He studied Jesuit Gymnasium at Hradec Králové, in Prague with F. Habermann and in Vienna with Wagenseil. About 1770 he settled in Prague. He became an important piano teacher, his house (known as Bertramka) was one of music life centre of Prague, and Mozart stayed here in 1787 and completed here his La nozze Di Figaro or Don Giovanni. Dušek was composing in so called Gallant Style. He created about 40 symphonies, concerts for harpsichords or pianos, many chamber musics and sonatas for piano.


  • František BENDA

    (* 22.11.1709 Benátky nad Jizerou - † 7.3.1786 Postupim)

    český skladatel, představitel raného hudebního klasicismu

    F. Benda: Autobiography (1763)

    D. Lee: A Musician at Court and Autobiography of F. Benda (Warren, MI, 1998)


  • Kateřina ŠMÍDOVÁ KALVACHOVÁ

    (* 1.1.1984 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Biography: Guest performances - J. K. Tyl Theatre, F. X. Šalda Theatre Liberec, cooperation - Philharmonie Luxembourg, Filharmonia Zielonogórska, Europera, Czech Philharmonic, Prague Symphony Orchestra, Czech Radio Symphony Orchestra, Brno Philharmonic, Bohuslav Martinů Philharmonic Orchestra Zlín, Moravian Philharmonic Olomouc, Czech Chamber Philharmonic Orchestra Pardubice, South Czech Philharmonic České Budějovice and others.

    Studies: Academy of Performing Arts Bratislava (Zlatica Livorová); Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (Magdaléna Hayóssyová); international singing courses Karlovy Vary (Magdaléna Blahušiaková); Peter Dvorský's international singing courses Jaroměřice nad Rokytnou (Zlatica Livorová); Peter Dvorský's international singing courses Piešťany (Zlatica Livorová).

    Repertoire (selection): E. Astorga, J. S. Bach, L. van Beethoven, V. Bellini, L. Bernstein, G. Bizet, S. Bodorová, A. Boito, F. Caccini, A. Caldara, G. Carissimi, A. Catalani, G. Charpentier, D. Cimarosa, P. I. Tchaikovsky, S. Donaudy, G. Donizetti, J. Dowland, A. Dvořák, P. Eben, G. Fauré, C. Franc, G. Gershwin, U. Giordano, Ch. Gounod, G. F. Händel, L. Janáček, F. Liszt, G. Mahler, P. Mascagni, W. A. Mozart, J. Offenbach, C. Orff, J. Pavlica, G. B. Pergolesi, F. Poulenc, G. Puccini, H. Purcell, M. Raichl, G. Rossini, A. Rubinstein, J. J. Ryba, F. Schubert, R. Schumann, K. Slavický, B. Smetana, T. Stapel, E. Suchoň, J. K. Vaňhal, G. Verdi, A. Vivaldi, R. Wagner, C. M. von Weber, R. V. Williams, H. Wolf, J. D. Zelenka.

    Competitions: Antonín Dvořák International Singing Competition in Karlovy Vary (2010, 3rd prize in the category of opera - Women up to 35 years of age), international opera competition Savonlinna Finland (2012, semi-finals); international singing contest Francesca Viñas Barcelona (2013, semi-finals).

    Festivals: International festival Mahler—Jihlava (2011, 2012), Janáček May (2012), Za poklady Broumovska (2010, 2013), Trutnov Autumn (2014), Podblanický podzim (2014), Prague Castle Music (2014) and others.

    Reviews, articles: "New Mařenka - Kateřina Šmídová Kalvachová - in the new performance in Plzeň has a nice and lyrical soprano, which is naturally created in vocals (she does not distort the vocals but articulates them, which I really appreciate because there are not many sopranos like that except for Gabriela Beňačková). She is naturally beautiful on the stage and she sang both arias in the first and third act with attitude and beauty of expression when we can say: yes, this soprano knows what she sings about. I am sure she will take piano or mezza voce passages to perfection in the upcoming re-runs. All in all, it was a great debut. We will probably hear about the lyrical soprano in the future." (Opera Plus, June 18, 2014).

    Agency: Arcodiva Management

    Contact:
    e-mail: k.smidovakalvachova@gmail.com


  • Vilém BLODEK

    (* 3.10.1834 Praha - † 1.5.1874 Praha)

    český skladatel, flétnista a pedagog

    He was studying piano with Dreyschock, flute with Eiser and composition with Kittl at Prague conservatory. After, he worked as a music teacher, concert pianist and conductor of Prague man choir. He wrote for it a number of choruses of patriotic topic. He is an author of his own flute tutor, music for 60 plays (f.e. music for the 1864 Shakespeare colebrations). Blodek's well-known work is his one act opera V studni (In the Well) in the style of early Romantics.

    Choose of works: comic opera Zítek, 1868-69, Symphony in D Minor, 1858-59.

    Literature:
    J. Tyrrell: Czech Opera /ed. Cambridge 1988/


  • Marie PODVALOVÁ

    (* 5.9.1909 Čakovice u Prahy - † 16.5.1992 Praha)

    česká operní pěvkyně - soprán

    Czech soprano

    She studied at the Prague Conservatory with Doubravka Branbergerová, Pavel Dědeček and direcktor Ferdinand Pujman. From 1935 to 1937, she was engaged as a soprano in Brno (she debuted as Martin in Musorgski´s Boris Godunov). From 1937 to 1978, she was engaged at the National Theatre in Prague, where she matured into a great artist under the conducting of Václav Talich and Zdeněk Chalabala. She was more that twenty years the main interpreter of dramatic roles such as Milada in Smetana´s Dalibor, Anežka in Two Widows, Hedvika in The Devil Wall; Foreign Duchess in Dvořák´s Rusalka, Armida in Dvořák´s Armida; Kostelnička in Janáček´s Jenůfa, Emilia Marty in The Case Macropulos; Venus in Wagner´s Tannhäuser, Senta in The FlyingDutchman, Ortruda in Lohengrin; Šárka in Fibich´s Šárka, Leonora in Beethoven´s Fidelio, Aida inVerdi´s Aida, Santuzza in Mascagni´s Cavalleria rusticana, Tosca in Puccini´s Tosca and others. She had a strong dramatic soprano voice, natural musicality, ab impressive appearance and dramatic talent. Her beest-known role after 1938 and after the Second World War on the stage of the National Theatre in Prague was the role of Smetana´s Libusse.


  • Marek KEPRT

    (* 7.6.1974 Olomouc)

    český klavírista, skladatel, hudební pedagog a organizátor


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